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Tom Keell
Thomas Henry Keell (24 September 1866 – 26 June 1938) was an English compositor who edited the anarchist periodical Freedom.[1] In 1907, he attended the International Anarchist Congress of Amsterdam, where he was hailed by Emma Goldman
Emma Goldman
as "one of our most devoted workers on the London Freedom".[2] Keell also contributed to Voice of Labour
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Typesetting
Typesetting
Typesetting
is the composition of text by means of arranging physical types[1] or the digital equivalents. Stored letters and other symbols (called sorts in mechanical systems and glyphs in digital systems) are retrieved and ordered according to a language's orthography for visual display. Typesetting
Typesetting
requires one or more fonts (which are widely but erroneously confused with and substituted for typefaces)
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Arthur Moyse
Arthur Moyse (21 June 1914 – 22 February 2003) was an Anglo-Irish anarchist, artist and writer. He was born in County Wexford
County Wexford
and moved to West London in his youth to Shepherd's Bush
Shepherd's Bush
where he continued to live until his death. In his youth he was actively involved in political activity including the battle of Cable Street in 1936. He also saw active service in World War Two, including the airborne landings at Arnhem in 1944, but he was court-martialled twice for insubordination.[1] As well as being something of a self-publisher, particularly with his attachment to London bohemia life and producing the ZeroOne magazine, he is most commonly known as an art critic and cartoonist
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Alan Albon
Alan Albon (24 August 1921 – 30 March 1989) was a British anarchist, pacifist and publisher. He served as an editor for Freedom before becoming one of the founding editors of Green Anarchist, with Richard Hunt and Marcus Christo. As a pacifist, he enjoyed a brief stint in the Independent Labour Party.[1] He was born in Edmonton on 24 August 1921 and died at Heathrow on 30 March 1989.[2] References[edit]^ Meltzer, Albert (1996). I Couldn't Paint Golden Angels. Edinburgh, Scotland: San Francisco, CA
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Marie-Louise Berneri
Marie Louise Berneri (March 1, 1918 – April 13, 1949) was an anarchist activist and author. She was involved with the short-lived publication, Revision, with Luis Mercier Vega and was a member of the group that edited Revolt, War Commentary, and the Freedom newspaper, which is still being published by the Freedom Bookstore in London. She was a continuous contributor to Spain and the World. She also wrote a survey of utopias, Journey Through Utopia, first published in 1950. Neither East Nor West is a selection of her writings (1952).Contents1 Early life 2 Anarchism 3 Death and legacy 4 Works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] She was born in Arezzo, Italy, the elder daughter of Camillo & Giovanna Berneri. The family went into exile in 1926 for resisting Mussolini. In 1936 her father went to Spain, to fight against the fascists in the Spanish Civil War. He was assassinated by communists in 1937
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Richard Boston
Richard Boston (29 December 1938 – 22 December 2006) was an English journalist and author, a rigorous dissenter and a belligerent pacifist
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Thomas Cantwell
Thomas Edward Cantwell (14 December 1864 – 29 December 1906) was a British anarchist activist. Born in the Pentonville Road area of London, Cantwell spent some time working as a basket-maker before entering the printing trade. Interested in anarchism, he joined the Socialist League in about 1886, and was elected to its council the following year. There, he was a prominent support of the anarcho-communist Joseph Lane.[1] The anarchist wing of the league became increasingly prominent, and from 1890, all the key posts were held by anarcho-communists. In 1892, David Nicholl, editor of its newspaper, Commonweal, was imprisoned, and Cantwell replaced him. He focused on producing revolutionary propaganda for the group. The following year, he was arrested for putting up posters calling for a protest against the wedding of Prince George, Duke of York, and Princess Mary of Teck, which stated that "He who would be free himself must strike the blow"
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Clifford Harper
Clifford Harper
Clifford Harper
(born 13 July 1949 in Chiswick, West London) is a worker, illustrator, and militant anarchist.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Clifford Harper
Clifford Harper
is a worker, illustrator and militant anarchist. He was born in Chiswick, West London – at that time within Middlesex – on 13 July 1949. His father was a postman and his mother a cook. Expelled from school at 13 and placed on two years probation at 14, he then worked in a series of "menial jobs" before "turning on, tuning in, and dropping out" in 1967. After living in a commune in Cumberland, he started a commune on Eel Pie Island
Eel Pie Island
in the River Thames near Richmond, Surrey, in 1969
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Harry Kelly (anarchist)
Harry May Kelly (1871–1953) was an American anarchist and lifelong activist in the Modern School movement.[1][2][3]Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and work 1.2 Years in England 1.3 Return to America2 Thought and activism 3 Works online 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and work[edit] Born in a thirteen-room house in Saint Charles, Missouri and christened in the local Episcopal church, Kelly spent his youth on the banks of the Mississippi.[4] His father was Cornish,[5] while his mother was a descendant of the Calvert family, founders of the city of Baltimore.[2] Once a partner of railroad magnate Thomas Alexander Scott, Kelly's father had lost his stake and took a job as a mine inspector, dying in poverty before Kelly's fifth birthday.[4] Kelly left school after the fifth grade and worked as a pressman in printing companies in order to support his family.[4] At twenty years old, he was wandering fr
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Peter Kropotkin
Pyotr Alexeevich Kropotkin (/kroʊˈpɒtkɪn, krə-/;[10] Russian: Пётр Алексе́евич Кропо́ткин; December 9, 1842 – February 8, 1921) was a Russian activist, revolutionary, scientist and philosopher who advocated anarchism. Born into an aristocratic land-owning family, he attended a military school and later served as an officer in Siberia, where he participated in several geological expeditions. He was imprisoned for his activism in 1874 and managed to escape two years later. He spent the next 41 years in exile in Switzerland, France (where he was imprisoned for almost four years) and in England. He returned to Russia after the Russian Revolution
Russian Revolution
in 1917, but was disappointed by the Bolshevik form of state socialism. Kropotkin was a proponent of a decentralised communist society free from central government and based on voluntary associations of self-governing communities and worker-run enterprises
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Albert Meltzer
Albert Isidore Meltzer (7 January 1920 – 7 May 1996) was an English anarcho-communist activist and writer.Contents1 Early life 2 Beliefs on anarchism 3 Meltzer's activism 4 Notes and references 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Meltzer was born in Hackney, London, of Jewish ancestry, and educated at The Latymer School, Edmonton. He was attracted to anarchism at the age of fifteen as a direct result of taking boxing lessons where he met Billy Campbell, seaman, boxer and anarchist.[1] At his first anarchist meeting, in 1935, he contradicted Emma Goldman's comments on boxing, considering that, as a woman, she could not appreciate the sport. As the Spanish Revolution turned into the Spanish Civil War
Spanish Civil War
Meltzer became active organising solidarity appeals. He involved himself with smuggling arms from Hamburg
Hamburg
to the CNT in Spain and acted as a contact for the Spanish anarchist intelligence services in Britain
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Max Nettlau
Max Heinrich Hermann Reinhardt Nettlau (German: [ˈnɛtlaʊ]; 30 April 1865 – 23 July 1944) was a German anarchist and historian. Although born in Neuwaldegg (today part of Vienna) and raised in Vienna, he lived there until the annexation to Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
in 1938. Max Nettlau retained his Prussian (later German) nationality throughout his life. A student of the Welsh language
Welsh language
he spent time in London where he joined the Socialist League and met William Morris. While in London he met anarchists such as Errico Malatesta
Errico Malatesta
and Peter Kropotkin
Peter Kropotkin
whom he remained in contact with for the rest of his life
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Anarcho-Syndicalism (book)
Anarcho-Syndicalism: Theory and Practice. An Introduction to a Subject Which the Spanish War Has Brought into Overwhelming Prominence is a book written by the German anarchist Rudolf Rocker. Its first edition (158 pages) was published by Secker and Warburg, London
London
in 1938 and was translated from Ray E. Chase. Rocker penned this political and philosophical work in 1937, at the behest of Emma Goldman, as an introduction to the ideals fueling the Spanish social revolution and resistance to capitalism and fascism the world over. Within, Rocker offers an introduction to anarchist ideas, a history of the international workers' movement, and an outline of the syndicalist strategies and tactics embraced at the time (direct action, sabotage and the general strike)
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Vernon Richards
Vernon Richards (19 July 1915 – 10 December 2001) was an Anglo-Italian anarchist, editor, author and companion of Marie-Louise Berneri.Contents1 Personal life 2 Career 3 Publications 4 External linksPersonal life[edit] He was born Vero Recchioni in London in 1915. He was educated at Emanuel School, and King's College London, where he trained as a civil engineer. He helped his father Emidio Recchioni with propaganda work against Benito Mussolini, was arrested in Paris in January 1935 and extradited from France. In 1936, he published in collaboration with Camillo Berneri, a bilingual anarchist and antifascist, the paper Italia Libera/Free Italy. Richards died in Hadleigh, Suffolk in 2001. Career[edit] Richards founded and edited Spain and the World, which became Revolt in 1939, and eventually was followed by War Commentary 1939–1945, all filling the gap left by the cessation of Freedom in 1932, and the title naturally reverted to Freedom from 1945
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Jack Robinson (anarchist)
Jack Robinson (died 20 March 1983) was an anarchist activist and editor of the Freedom paper. A conscientious objector, during the war he worked in an epileptic colony because he was a nurse by training. Linked to this he also took part in a medical experiment living on a diet which caused scurvy, but in fact he earned a good part of his living as a book trader. And his purchase of the tenancy linked to Albert Meltzer’s Wooden Shoe Press was the premise of the long dispute between Meltzer and Vernon Richards.[1] He worked alongside Lilian Wolfe and Mary Canipa in the Freedom Bookshop. Jack contributed quite a lot of articles for Freedom and Anarchy, sometimes anonymously, during the 1970s
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Philip Sansom
Philip Richard Sansom (19 September 1916 – 24 October 1999) was an anarchist writer and activist. Sansom began working life as a commercial artist. During the Second World War he was a conscientious objector, and worked in farming for a while. From 1943 he worked on War Commentary, a wartime substitute for the anarchist paper Freedom. With his co-editors Vernon Richards and John Hewetson, he was tried at the Old Bailey in 1945[1] and imprisoned for nine months for conspiring to publish an article allegedly inciting soldiers to disaffect from their duty or allegiance
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