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Tlacochcalcatl
Tlacochcalcatl
Tlacochcalcatl
( Nahuatl
Nahuatl
pronunciation: [t͡ɬakotʃˈkaɬkat͡ɬ] "The man from the house of darts") was an Aztec
Aztec
military title or rank; roughly equivalent to the modern title of General. In Aztec warfare the tlacochcalcatl was second in command only to the tlatoani and he usually lead the Aztec
Aztec
army into battle when the ruler was otherwise occupied. Together with the tlacateccatl (general), he was in charge of the Aztec
Aztec
army and undertook all military decisions and planning once the tlatoani had decided to undertake a campaign. The tlacochcalcatl was also in charge of the tlacochcalco. Tlacochcalco ("in the house of darts"[1]) was the name of four armories placed at the four entries to the ceremonial precinct of the Aztec
Aztec
capital Tenochtitlan
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Aztec
Aztec
Aztec
culture (/ˈæztɛk/), was a Mesoamerican culture that flourished in central Mexico
Mexico
in the post-classic period from 1300 to 1521, during the time in which a triple alliance of the Mexica, Texcoca and Tepaneca tribes established the Aztec
Aztec
empire. The Aztec people were certain ethnic groups of central Mexico, particularly those groups who spoke the Nahuatl
Nahuatl
language and who dominated large parts of Mesoamerica
Mesoamerica
from the 14th to the 16th centuries. Aztec
Aztec
culture is the culture of the people referred to as Aztecs, but since most ethnic groups of central Mexico
Mexico
in the postclassic period shared basic cultural traits, many of the traits that characterize Aztec
Aztec
culture cannot be said to be exclusive to the Aztecs
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Moctezuma Ilhuicamina
Moctezuma I
Moctezuma I
(c. 1398-1469), also known as Motecuhzomatzin Ilhuicamina ( modern Nahuatl pronunciation (help·info)), Huehuemotecuhzoma or Montezuma I (Classical Nahuatl: Motēuczōma Ilhuicamīna [moteːkʷˈsoːma ilwikaˈmiːna], Classical Nahuatl: Huēhuemotēuczōma [weːwemoteːkʷˈsoːma]), was the second Aztec emperor and fifth king of Tenochtitlan. During his reign, the Aztec Empire was consolidated, major expansion was undertaken, and Tenochtitlan
Tenochtitlan
started becoming the dominant partner of the Aztec Triple Alliance. Often mistaken for his popular descendent, Moctezuma II, Moctezuma I
Moctezuma I
greatly contributed to the famed Aztec Empire
Aztec Empire
that thrived until Spanish arrival, and he ruled over a period of peace from 1440 to 1453
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Armory (military)
An arsenal is a place where arms and ammunition are made, maintained and repaired, stored, or issued, in any combination, whether privately or publicly owned
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Quecholli
Quecholli is the name of the fourteenth month of the Aztec calendar. It is also a festival in the Aztec religion and the Principal deity is Mixcoatl.It is called the Precious Feather and hunting is done during this season. [1][2][3][4][2] References[edit]^ "Quecholli, the 14th Month of the Aztec Solar Calendar". World Digital Library. Retrieved 21 July 2013.  ^ a b Michel Conan (2007). Sacred Gardens And Landscapes: Ritual And Agency. Dumbarton Oaks. pp. 84–. ISBN 978-0-88402-305-0. Retrieved 24 July 2013.  ^ Albert Gallatin (1845). Semi-civilized Nations of Mexico, Yucatan, A. Central America. pp. 83–. Retrieved 21 July 2013.  ^ "The Aztec Festivals". www.amoxtli.org. Archived from the original on 16 September 2015. Retrieved 24 July 2013. This mythology-related article is a stub
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Spanish Empire
The Spanish Empire
Empire
(Spanish: Imperio Español) was one of the largest empires in history. At the time, it was not known as that by the Spanish with the monarch ruling kingdoms in Spain, his possessions in Italy and northern Europe, and in the "Spanish Indies," its New World territories and the Philippines.[1] From the late fifteenth century to the early nineteenth, Spain's crown of Castile controlled a huge overseas territory in the New World.[2][3] The crown's main source of wealth was from gold and silver mined in Mexico
Mexico
and Peru. The empire reached the peak of its military, political and economic power under the Spanish Habsburgs,[4] through most of the 16th and 17th centuries, and its greatest territorial extent under the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
in the 18th century
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Conquistador
Conquistadors /kɒŋˈkɪstəˌdɔːrz/ (from Portuguese or Spanish conquistadores "conquerors"; Spanish pronunciation: [koŋkistaˈðoɾes], Portuguese pronunciation: [kũkiʃtɐˈdoɾis], [kõkiʃtɐˈðoɾɨʃ]) is a term used to refer to the soldiers and explorers of the Spanish Empire or the Portuguese Empire
Portuguese Empire
in a general sense.[1][2] During the Age of Discovery, conquistadors sailed beyond Europe to the Americas, Oceania, Africa and Asia, conquering territory and opening trade routes
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Huitzilihuitl
Huitzilihuitl
Huitzilihuitl
Nahuatl pronunciation: [wit͡siˈliʔwit͡ɬ] ( listen) (Nahuatl language; English: Hummingbird Feather) (d. ca. 1417) was the second tlatoani of Tenochtitlan, governing from 1396 to 1417,[1] (or 1390 to 1410 according to other sources).[2]Contents1 Biography1.1 Family and childhood 1.2 Reign 1.3 Death2 Personal life 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Family and childhood[edit] Huitzilíhuitl was born in Tenochtitlan, and was the son of Acamapichtli, first tlatoani of the Mexica, and Queen Tezcatlan Miyahuatzin, and had a half-brother Itzcoatl. His maternal grandfather was Acacitli. Only 16 years old when his father died, Huitzilihuitl was elected by the principal chiefs, warriors and priests of the city to replace him
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Itzcoatl
Itzcoatl
Itzcoatl
(Classical Nahuatl: Itzcōhuātl [it͡sˈkoːwaːt͡ɬ], "Obsidian Serpent",  modern Nahuatl pronunciation (help·info)) was the fourth king of Tenochtitlan, ruling from 1427 (or 1428) to 1440, the period when the Mexica[1] threw off the domination of the Tepanecs and laid the foundations for the eventual Aztec Empire.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Itzcoatl
Itzcoatl
was an illegitimate son of tlàtoāni Acamapichtli
Acamapichtli
and an unknown Tepanec
Tepanec
woman from Azcapotzalco.[2] He was elected as the king when his predecessor, his nephew Chimalpopoca, was killed by Maxtla
Maxtla
of the nearby Tepanec
Tepanec
āltepētl (city-state) of Azcapotzalco
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Chimalpopoca
Chimalpopoca
Chimalpopoca
(Classical Nahuatl: Chīmalpopōca [t͡ʃiːmaɬpoˈpoːka] for "smoking shield,"  modern Nahuatl pronunciation (help·info)) (1397–1427) was the third Emperor of Tenochtitlan
Tenochtitlan
(1417–1427).Contents1 Biography1.1 Rule2 Family 3 Death 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Chimalpopoca
Chimalpopoca
was born to the Emperor Huitzilihuitl
Huitzilihuitl
and Queen Ayauhcihuatl. Rule[edit] On the day of Chimalpopoca's coronation in 1417 (some sources say 1416 or 1418), his brother Tlacaelel I
Tlacaelel I
was named high priest
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Cihuacoatl (position)
The cihuacoatl (Classical Nahuatl: cihuācōātl [siwaːˈkoːaːtɬ], for "female twin"), was a supreme leader under the Tlatoani
Tlatoani
(Aztec emperor), or an esteemed advisor, within the Aztec Empire system of government. Officeholders[edit] Tlacaelel
Tlacaelel
(1420s-1487); office created for him Tlilpotoncatzin (1487-1503) Tlacaelel
Tlacaelel
II (1503-1520) Matlatzincatzin (1520) Tlacotzin (1520-1525); final officeholderIn popular culture[edit] The position features in four historical novels by Simon Levack. See also[edit]Class in Aztec societyThis article related to indigenous Mesoamerican culture is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis government job-related article is a stub
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Aztec Society
Pre-Columbian Aztec
Aztec
society was a highly complex and stratified society that developed among the Aztecs of central Mexico
Mexico
in the centuries prior to the Spanish conquest of Mexico, and which was built on the cultural foundations of the larger region of Mesoamerica. Politically, the society was organized into independent city-states, called altepetls, composed of smaller divisions (calpulli), which were again usually composed of one or more extended kinship groups. Socially, the society depended on a rather strict division between nobles and free commoners, both of which were themselves divided into elaborate hierarchies of social status, responsibilities, and power. Economically the society was dependent on agriculture, and also to a large extent on warfare
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Axayacatl
Axayacatl
Axayacatl
(/ˌæksəˈjɑːkətəl/; Classical Nahuatl: āxāyacatl, Nahuatl pronunciation: [aːʃaːˈjákatɬ] ( listen); Spanish: Axayácatl, pronounced [aksaˈʝakatɬ]; meaning "face of water"; c. 1449-1481) was the sixth tlatoani of the altepetl of Tenochtitlan
Tenochtitlan
and ruler of the Aztec Triple Alliance.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life and background 1.2 Rise to power 1.3 Military actions and death2 Notes 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life and background[edit] Axayacatl
Axayacatl
was a son of the princess Atotoztli II
Atotoztli II
and her cousin, prince Tezozomoc. He was a grandson of the Emperors Moctezuma I
Moctezuma I
and Itzcoatl
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Tizoc
Tizocic [tiˈsosik] or Tizocicatzin Nahuatl pronunciation: [tisosiˈkat͡sin] ( listen) usually known in English as Tizoc, was the seventh tlatoani of Tenochtitlan.Contents1 Biography1.1 Family 1.2 Reign 1.3 Death2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Family[edit] Tizoc
Tizoc
was a son of the Princess Atotoztli II
Atotoztli II
and her cousin, prince Tezozomoc. He was a grandson of the Emperors Moctezuma I
Moctezuma I
and Itzcoatl. He was a descendant of the King Cuauhtototzin. He was a successor of his brother Axayacatl
Axayacatl
and his other brother was Emperor Ahuitzotl
Ahuitzotl
and his sister was the Queen Chalchiuhnenetzin
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Ahuitzotl
Ahuitzotl
Ahuitzotl
(Nahuatl languages: āhuitzotl, Nahuatl pronunciation: [aːˈwit͡sot͡ɬ] ( listen)) was the eighth Aztec
Aztec
ruler, the Hueyi Tlatoani
Hueyi Tlatoani
of the city of Tenochtitlan, son of princess Atotoztli II. He was responsible for much of the expansion of the Mexica domain, and consolidated the empire's power after emulating his predecessor
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Atlatl
A spear-thrower or atlatl (/ˈɑːt.lɑːtəl/[1] or /ˈæt.lætəl/; Nahuatl
Nahuatl
languages: ahtlatl; Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈaʔt͡ɬat͡ɬ]) is a tool that uses leverage to achieve greater velocity in dart-throwing, and includes a bearing surface which allows the user to store energy during the throw. It may consist of a shaft with a cup or a spur at the end that supports and propels the butt of the dart. The spear-thrower is held in one hand, gripped near the end farthest from the cup. The dart is thrown by the action of the upper arm and wrist. The throwing arm together with the atlatl acts as a lever. The spear-thrower is a low-mass, fast-moving extension of the throwing arm, increasing the length of the lever
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