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Titanichthys
Brontichthys Titanichthys
Titanichthys
is a genus of giant, aberrant marine placoderm from shallow seas of the Late Devonian
Devonian
of Morocco, Eastern North America, and possibly Europe.[1] Many of the species approached Dunkleosteus
Dunkleosteus
in size and build. Unlike its relative, however, the various species of Titanichys had small, ineffective-looking mouth-plates that lacked a sharp cutting edge. It is assumed that Titanichthys
Titanichthys
was a filter feeder that used its capacious mouth to swallow or inhale schools of small, anchovy-like fish, or possibly krill-like zooplankton, and that the mouth-plates retained the prey while allowing the water to escape as it closed its mouth.Contents1 Species1.1 T. agassizi 1.2 T. attenuatus 1.3 T. clarkii 1.4 T. hussakofi 1.5 T. rectus 1.6 T. kozlowskii 1.7 T
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Famennian
The Famennian is the latter of two faunal stages in the Late Devonian epoch. It lasted from 372.2 million years ago to 358.9 million years ago. It was preceded by the Frasnian stage and followed by the Tournaisian stage. It was during this age that tetrapods first appeared
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Encyclopedia Of Life
The Encyclopedia of Life
Life
(EOL) is a free, online collaborative encyclopedia intended to document all of the 1.9 million living species known to science. It is compiled from existing databases and from contributions by experts and non-experts throughout the world.[2] It aims to build one "infinitely expandable" page for each species, including video, sound, images, graphics, as well as text.[3] In addition, the Encyclopedia incorporates content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which digitizes millions of pages of printed literature from the world's major natural history libraries. The project was initially backed by a US$50 million funding commitment, led by the MacArthur Foundation
MacArthur Foundation
and the Sloan Foundation, who provided US$20 million and US$5 million, respectively
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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Mikko's Phylogeny Archive
Mikko's Phylogeny Archive is an amateur paleontology website maintained by Mikko Haaramo, a student at the University of Helsinki's Department of Geology, Division of Geology and Palaeontology.[1] The project is aimed at collecting phylogenetic trees of all organisms. Each page presents a cladogram that is hyperlinked to its parent and daughter cladograms, plus a section for references. Taxa of uncertain relationship are indicated by a question mark. No indication is given for what part of the cladogram is based on which specific references. The site was originally simply named "Life as We Know It", and with the Dinosauricon it was the first web-site to use an ascii text-based format for showing cladograms. Although the Archive has been hosted by the Finnish Museum of the Natural History and now the University of Helsinki's servers, the museum has no formal affiliation with it
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Dinosaur
Dinosaurs
Dinosaurs
are a diverse group of reptiles[note 1] of the clade Dinosauria. They first appeared during the Triassic
Triassic
period, between 243 and 231 million years ago,[1] although the exact origin and timing of the evolution of dinosaurs is the subject of active research.[2] They became the dominant terrestrial vertebrates after the Triassic– Jurassic
Jurassic
extinction event 201 million years ago; their dominance continued through the Jurassic
Jurassic
and Cretaceous
Cretaceous
periods
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Dunkleosteidae
Dunkleosteidae
Dunkleosteidae
is an extinct family of arthrodire placoderms. The gigantic apex predator Dunkleosteus terrelli
Dunkleosteus terrelli
is the best known member of this group. While they were previously thought to be close relatives of the genus Dinichthys
Dinichthys
(when they were not synonymized as each other) and grouped together in the family Dinichthyidae, more recent studies have shown that the two taxa represent two very distinct clades within Arthrodira.[1] The reappraisal of Kiangyousteus lead to a restructuring of the family, with the inclusions of the benthic, aberrant Heterosteus (and the other members of Heterosteidae) as the sister taxon of Dunkleosteus, and the Late Emsian Xiangshuiosteus
Xiangshuiosteus
as the sister taxon of Eastmanosteus
Eastmanosteus
calliaspis (with the direct implication that E
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Bruntonichthys
Bruntonichthys
Bruntonichthys
is an arthrodire placoderm from the Gogo Reef Formation. It was a small fish, having proportionately huge eyes, and small jaws. Researchers suggest it may have preyed on small mollusks. References[edit]^ DENNIS, K. and MILES, R. S. (1980), New durophagous arthrodires from Gogo, Western Australia. Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, 69: 43–85. doi: 10.1111/j.1096-3642.1980.tb01932.xPaleontology portalv t eDunkleosteidaeKingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Placodermi Order: Arthrodira Superfamily: DunkleosteoideaGeneraDunkleosteus Eastmanosteus Golshanichthys Hussakofia Xiangshuiosteus Kiangyousteus Heterosteus Herasmius YinosteusTaxon identifiersWd: Q2927047 EoL: 10654877 Fossilworks: 34313 GBIF: 4852983This article about a placoderm is a stub
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Holy Cross Mountains
The Świętokrzyskie Mountains
Świętokrzyskie Mountains
(Polish: Góry Świętokrzyskie, IPA: [ˈɡurɨ ɕvjɛntɔˈkʂɨskʲɛ] ( listen), Holy Cross Mountains) are a mountain range in central Poland, near the city of Kielce
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Zooplankton
Zooplankton
Zooplankton
(pronounced in several different ways, including /ˈzoʊəˌplæŋktən, ˈzuːəˌ-, ˈzoʊoʊˌ-, ˈzuːˌ-, -ˌplæŋtən/[1] or /ˌzoʊəˈplæŋktən, -ˌtɒn/.[2]) are heterotrophic (sometimes detritivorous) plankton. Plankton
Plankton
are organisms drifting in oceans, seas, and bodies of fresh water. The word "zooplankton" is derived from the Greek zoon (ζῴον), meaning "animal", and planktos (πλαγκτός), meaning "wanderer" or "drifter".[3] Individual zooplankton are usually microscopic, but some (such as jellyfish) are larger and visible with the naked eye.Contents1 Ecology 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEcology[edit]A copepod ( Calanoida
Calanoida
sp.)A jellyfish (Aequorea victoria) Zooplankton
Zooplankton
is a categorization spanning a range of organism sizes including small protozoans and large metazoans
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Krill
Krill
Krill
are small crustaceans of the order Euphausiacea, and are found in all the world's oceans. The name "krill" comes from the Norwegian word krill, meaning "small fry of fish",[1] which is also often attributed to species of fish. Krill
Krill
are considered an important trophic level connection – near the bottom of the food chain – because they feed on phytoplankton and (to a lesser extent) zooplankton, converting these into a form suitable for many larger animals for which krill make up the largest part of their diets. In the Southern Ocean, one species, the Antarctic krill, Euphausia
Euphausia
superba, makes up an estimated biomass of around 379,000,000 tonnes,[2] making it among the species with the largest total biomass
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Anchovy
An anchovy is a small, common salt-water forage fish of the family Engraulidae. The 144 species are placed in 17 genera; they are found in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, and in the Black Sea
Black Sea
and the Mediterranean Sea
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Filter Feeder
Filter feeders are a sub-group of suspension feeding animals that feed by straining suspended matter and food particles from water, typically by passing the water over a specialized filtering structure. Some animals that use this method of feeding are clams, krill, sponges, baleen whales, and many fish (including some sharks). Some birds, such as flamingos and certain species of duck, are also filter feeders. Filter feeders can play an important role in clarifying water, and are therefore considered ecosystem engineers.Contents1 Fish 2 Crustaceans 3 Baleen
Baleen
whales 4 Bivalves 5 Sponges 6 Cnidarians 7 Flamingos 8 Pterosaurs 9 Marine reptiles 10 See also 11 Notes 12 References 13 External linksFish[edit] See also: Forage fish Most forage fish are filter feeders
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