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Tipitaka
Tripiṭaka, also referred to as Tipiṭaka, is the traditional term for the Buddhist scriptures.[1][2] The version canonical to Theravada Buddhism
Buddhism
is often referred to as Pali
Pali
Canon in English. Mahayana Buddhism
Buddhism
also reveres the Tripitaka as authoritative but, unlike Theravadins, it also reveres various derivative literature and commentaries that were composed much later.[1][3] The Tripitakas were composed between about 500 BCE to about the start of the common era, likely written down for the first time in the 1st century BCE.[3] The Dipavamsa
Dipavamsa
states that during the reign of Valagamba of Anuradhapura
Valagamba of Anuradhapura
(29–17 BCE) the monks who had previously remembered the Tipitaka and its commentary orally now wrote them down in books, because of the threat posed by famine and war
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Pali
Pali
Pali
(Pāli) or Magadhan is a Prakrit
Prakrit
language native to the Indian subcontinent
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Dharma
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
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Max Muller
Friedrich Max Müller
Max Müller
(6 December 1823 – 28 October 1900), generally known as Max Müller, was a German-born philologist and Orientalist, who lived and studied in Britain for most of his life. He was one of the founders of the western academic field of Indian studies and the discipline of comparative religion.[1] Müller wrote both scholarly and popular works on the subject of Indology. The Sacred Books of the East, a 50-volume set of English translations, was prepared under his direction
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Tripitaka Koreana
The Tripiṭaka
Tripiṭaka
Koreana (lit. Goryeo
Goryeo
Tripiṭaka) or Palman Daejanggyeong ("Eighty-Thousand Tripiṭaka") is a Korean collection of the Tripiṭaka
Tripiṭaka
(Buddhist scriptures, and the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
word for "three baskets"), carved onto 81,258 wooden printing blocks in the 13th century.[1] It is the world's most comprehensive and oldest intact version of Buddhist canon in Hanja
Hanja
script, with no known errors or errata in the 52,330,152 characters which are organized in over 1496 titles and 6568 volumes. Each wood block measures 24 centimeters in height and 70 centimeters in length.[2] The thickness of the blocks ranges from 2.6 to 4 centimeters and each weighs about three to four kilograms
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Haeinsa
Coordinates: 35°48′N 128°6′E / 35.800°N 128.100°E / 35.800; 128.100 Haeinsa
Haeinsa
(해인사, 海印寺: Temple of the Ocean Mudra) is a head temple of the Jogye Order
Jogye Order
(대한불교조계종, 大韓佛敎 曹溪宗) of Korean Seon
Korean Seon
Buddhism
Buddhism
in Gayasan National Park (가야산, 伽倻山), South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea. Haeinsa
Haeinsa
is most notable for being the home of the Tripitaka Koreana, the whole of the Buddhist Scriptures carved onto 81,350 wooden printing blocks, which it has housed since 1398.[1] Haeinsa
Haeinsa
is one of the Three Jewels Temples, and represents Dharma
Dharma
or the Buddha’s teachings
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Hapcheon County
Hapcheon County
Hapcheon County
(Hapcheon-gun) is a county in South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea. Famous people born in the county include former South Korean president Chun Doo-hwan.Contents1 Location 2 Places of interest 3 Special
Special
products 4 Tourism 5 Climate 6 Sister cities 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksLocation[edit] Located in northwestern Gyeongsangnam-do, the county is surrounded by Changnyeong as well as Euiryeong to the Southeast, Geochang as well as Sancheong-gun to the West. High and precipitous hills are densely situated and the eastern part is flatter by the flowing streams of the Nakdong River.[1] Places of interest[edit] Haeinsa
Haeinsa
is a famous temple located in Hapcheon county. Mt
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Vinaya
The Vinaya
Vinaya
( Pali
Pali
and Sanskrit, literally meaning "leading out", "education", "discipline") is the regulatory framework for the sangha or monastic community of Buddhism
Buddhism
based on the canonical texts called the Vinaya
Vinaya
Pitaka
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Dharmachakra
The dharmachakra (IAST: dharmacakra; Pali
Pali
dhammacakka; "Wheel of the Dharma") is one of the Ashtamangala[1] of Indian religions
Indian religions
such as Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism
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History Of Buddhism
The history of Buddhism
Buddhism
spans from the 5th century BCE to the present. Buddhism
Buddhism
arose in the eastern part of Ancient India, in and around the ancient Kingdom of Magadha
Magadha
(now in Bihar, India), and is based on the teachings of Siddhārtha Gautama. This makes it one of the oldest religions practiced today. The religion evolved as it spread from the northeastern region of the Indian subcontinent through Central, East, and Southeast Asia. At one time or another, it influenced most of the Asian continent
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Timeline Of Buddhism
The purpose of this timeline is to give a detailed account of Buddhism from the birth of Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha
to the present.Contents1 Timeline of events 2 Dates2.1 6th–5th century BCE 2.2 4th century BCE 2.3 3rd century BCE 2.4 2nd century BCE 2.5 1st century BCE 2.6 1st century 2.7 2nd century 2.8 3rd century 2.9 4th century 2.10 5th century 2.11 6th century 2.12 7th century 2.13 8th century 2.14 9th century 2.15 10th century 2.16 11th century 2.17 12th century 2.18 13th century 2.19 14th century 2.20 15th century 2.21 16th century 2.22 17th century 2.23 18th century 2.24 19th century 2.25 20th century 2.26 21st century3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 Sources6.1 Printed sources 6.2 Web-sources7 External linksTimeline of events[edit]Timeline: Development and propagation of Buddhist
Buddhist
traditions (ca. 450 BCE – ca
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Four Noble Truths
The Four Noble Truths
Four Noble Truths
refer to and express the basic orientation of Buddhism[1] in a short expression:[2][note 1] we crave and cling to impermanent states and things,[3] which are dukkha,[4] "incapable of satisfying"[web 1] and painful.[web 1][3][5][6][7][web 2] This craving keeps us caught in samsara,[note 2] the endless cycle of repeated rebirth and dying again, and the dukkha that comes with it.[note 3] There is, however, a way to end this cycle,[8][note 4] namely by attaining nirvana, cessation of craving, whereafter rebirth and associated dukkha will no longer aris
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Sutta Pitaka
The Sutta Pitaka
Sutta Pitaka
(suttapiṭaka; or Suttanta Pitaka; Basket of Discourse; cf Sanskrit
Sanskrit
सूत्र पिटक Sūtra Piṭaka) is the second of the three divisions of the Tripitaka
Tripitaka
or Pali
Pali
Canon, the Pali
Pali
collection of Buddhist writings of Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism. The Sutta Pitaka
Sutta Pitaka
contains more than 10,000 suttas (teachings) attributed to the Buddha or his close companions. The other two collections are the Vinaya Pitaka
Vinaya Pitaka
and the Abhidhamma Pitaka.Contents1 Origins 2 Contents2.1 Digha Nikāya 2.2 Majjhima Nikāya 2.3 Samyutta Nikaya 2.4 Anguttara Nikāya 2.5 Khuddaka Nikāya3 Translations 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksOrigins[edit] This scripture describes the first Buddhist council
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Skandha
Skandhas (Sanskrit) or khandhas (Pāḷi) means "heaps, aggregates, collections, groupings".[1] In Buddhism, it refers to the five aggregates concept that asserts five factors constitute and completely explain a sentient being’s mental and physical existence[2][3][4]. The five aggregates or heaps are: form (or matter or body) (rupa), sensations (or feelings, received from form) (vedana), perceptions (samjna), mental activity or formations (sankhara), and consciousness (vijnana).[5][6][7] The skandhas refute the idea of a "being or individual", and complements the anatta doctrine of Buddhism
Buddhism
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Impermanence
Impermanence, also called Anicca or Anitya,[1] is one of the essential doctrines and a part of three marks of existence in Buddhism.[2][3][4] The doctrine asserts that all of conditioned existence, without exception, is "transient, evanescent, inconstant".[2] All temporal things, whether material or mental, are compounded objects in a continuous change of condition, subject to decline and destruction.[2][5] The concept of impermanence is also found in various schools of Hinduism and Jainism.[6][7] Anicca or impermanence is understood in Buddhism
Buddhism
as the first of three marks of existence, the other two being dukkha (suffering, pain, unsatisfactoriness) and anatta (non-self, non-soul, no essence).[4][3][8] All physical and mental events, states Buddhism, come into being and dissolve.[9] Human life embodies this flux in the aging process, the cycle of repeated birth and death (Samsara), nothing lasts, and everything decays
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Dukkha
Dukkha
Dukkha
(/ˈduːkə/; Pāli; Sanskrit: duḥkha; Tibetan: སྡུག་བསྔལ་ sdug bsngal, pr. "duk-ngel") is an important Buddhist
Buddhist
concept, commonly translated as "suffering", "pain", "unsatisfactoriness" or "stress".[1][2][3][4] It refers to the fundamental unsatisfactoriness and painfulness of mundane life. It is the first of the Four Noble Truths
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