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Tinto Brass
Giovanni "Tinto" Brass (born 26 March 1933) is an Italian filmmaker. In the 1960s and 1970s, he directed many critically acclaimed avant-garde films of various genres
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2009 Venice Film Festival
The 66th annual Venice International Film Festival held in Venice, Italy, was opened on 2 September 2009 by Baarìa - La porta del vento. International competition jury, led by Ang Lee, awarded Leone d'Oro to Lebanon.[1] The festival was closed on 12 September 2009, with Maria Grazia Cucinotta serving as the festival's hostess.[2][3]Contents1 Jury1.1 Official Selection Jury 1.2 Orizzonti / Horizons Jury 1.3 Premio Luigi De Laurentiis for Best Debut Feature Jury 1.4 Corto-Cortissimo jury2 Festival line-up 3 Official selection3.1 In competition 3.2 Out of competition4 Autonomous sections4.1 Venice International Film Critics' Week5 Prizes5.1 Venezia 66 5.2 Orizzonti 5.3 Collateral Prizes6 References 7 External linksJury[edit] The international juries of the 66th Venice International Film Festival were composed as follows:[4][5][6] Official Selection Jury[edit]Ang Lee (head of jury) Sergei Bodrov Sandrine B
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Trademark
A trademark, trade mark, or trade-mark[1] is a recognizable sign, design, or expression which identifies products or services of a particular source from those of others,[2][3] although trademarks used to identify services are usually called service marks.[4][5] The trademark owner can be an individual, business organization, or any legal entity. A trademark may be located on a package, a label, a voucher, or on the product itself. For the sake of corporate identity, trademarks are often displayed on company buildings. The first legislative act concerning trademarks was passed by the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
in 1266 under the reign of Henry III, requiring all bakers to use a distinctive mark for the bread they sold. The first modern trademark laws emerged in the late 19th century. In France the first comprehensive trademark system in the world was passed into law in 1857
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Sic
The Latin
Latin
adverb sic ("thus", "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written")[1] inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription. The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text
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Milan
Milan
Milan
(/mɪˈlæn, -ˈlɑːn/;[3] Italian: Milano [miˈlaːno] ( listen); Lombard: Milan
Milan
[miˈlãː] (Milanese variant))[4][5] is the capital of Lom
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Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
CBE (born 30 January 1937) is an English actress of stage, screen and television, and a political activist. She is a 2003 American Theatre Hall of Fame inductee,[1] and received the 2010 BAFTA Fellowship.[2] Redgrave rose to prominence in 1961 playing Rosalind in As You Like It with the Royal Shakespeare Company
Royal Shakespeare Company
and has since starred in more than 35 productions in London's West End and on Broadway, winning the 1984 Olivier Award for Best Actress in a Revival for The Aspern Papers, and the 2003 Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Actress in a Play for the revival of Long Day's Journey into Night
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Franco Nero
Francesco Clemente Giuseppe Sparanero (born 23 November 1941), better known by his stage name Franco Nero, is an Italian actor. He is best known for his breakthrough role as the title character in Sergio Corbucci's Spaghetti Western
Spaghetti Western
film Django (1966), a role that he reprised in Nello Rossati's Django Strikes Again
Django Strikes Again
(1987). Since then, he has performed over 200 leading and supporting roles in a wide variety of films and television programmes in both Italy and abroad, in genres ranging from poliziotteschi, to action, to drama, to war, and musicals
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Impressionistic
Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement characterised by relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. Impressionism originated with a group of Paris-based artists whose independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s. The Impressionists faced harsh opposition from the conventional art community in France
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Panning (camera)
In cinematography and photography panning means swivelling a still or video camera horizontally from a fixed position. This motion is similar to the motion of a person when they turn their head on their neck from left to right. In the resulting image, the view seems to "pass by" the spectator as new material appears on one side of the screen and exits from the other, although perspective lines reveal that the entire image is seen from a fixed point of view. The term panning is derived from panorama, suggesting an expansive view that exceeds the gaze, forcing the viewer to turn their head in order to take everything in
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Multiple-camera Setup
The multiple-camera setup, multiple-camera mode of production, multi-camera or simply multicam is a method of filmmaking and video production. Several cameras—either film or professional video cameras—are employed on the set and simultaneously record or broadcast a scene. It is often contrasted with single-camera setup, which uses one camera. Generally, the two outer cameras shoot close-up shots or "crosses" of the two most active characters on the set at any given time, while the central camera or cameras shoot a wider master shot to capture the overall action and establish the geography of the room. In this way, multiple shots are obtained in a single take without having to start and stop the action. This is more efficient for programs that are to be shown a short time after being shot as it reduces the time spent in film or video editing. It is also a virtual necessity for regular, high-output shows like daily soap operas
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Pubic Hair
Pubic hair
Pubic hair
is terminal body hair that is found in the genital area of adolescent and adult humans. The hair is located on and around the sex organs and sometimes at the top of the inside of the thighs. In the pubic region around the pubis bone, it is known as a pubic patch. Pubic hair
Pubic hair
is found on the scrotum in the male and on the vulva in the female. Although fine vellus hair is present in the area in childhood, pubic hair is considered to be the heavier, longer and coarser hair that develops during puberty as an effect of rising levels of androgens in males and estrogens in females. Pubic hair
Pubic hair
differs from other hair on the body and is a secondary sex characteristic. Many cultures regard pubic hair as erotic, and in most cultures pubic hair is associated with the genitals, which both men and women are expected to keep covered at all times
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A Clockwork Orange (film)
A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 dystopian crime film adapted, produced, and directed by Stanley Kubrick, based on Anthony Burgess's 1962 novel of the same name. It employs disturbing, violent images to comment on psychiatry, juvenile delinquency, youth gangs, and other social, political, and economic subjects in a dystopian near-future Britain. Alex (Malcolm McDowell), the main character, is a charismatic, antisocial delinquent whose interests include classical music (especially Beethoven), rape, and what is termed "ultra-violence". He leads a small gang of thugs, Pete (Michael Tarn), Georgie (James Marcus), and Dim (Warren Clarke), whom he calls his droogs (from the Russian word друг, "friend", "buddy"). The film chronicles the horrific crime spree of his gang, his capture, and attempted rehabilitation via a controversial psychological conditioning technique by the Minister of the Interior (Anthony Sharp), named Ludovico
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Underarm Hair
Underarm
Underarm
hair, also known as axillary hair, is the hair in the underarm area (axilla).Contents1 Development and function 2 Cultural attitudes 3 In art 4 See also 5 ReferencesDevelopment and function[edit] Underarm
Underarm
hair, as human body hair, normally starts
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The Key (Tanizaki Novel)
The /ðə/ ( listen) is a grammatical article in English, denoting person(s) or thing(s) already mentioned, under discussion, implied, or otherwise presumed familiar to listeners or readers. It is the only definite article in English. The is the most commonly used word in the English language, accounting for 7 percent of all words.[1] It is derived from gendered articles in Old English which merged in Middle English and now has a single form used with nouns of either gender. It can be used with both singular and plural nouns and with nouns that start with any letter
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The Mistress Of The Inn
Mistress
Mistress
may refer to:Contents1 Title or form of address 2 In ancient religions 3 In arts and entertainment 4 Other uses 5 See alsoTitle or form of address[edit] Mistress
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Mario Soldati
Mario Soldati
Mario Soldati
(17 November 1906 – 19 June 1999) was an Italian writer and film director. In 1954 he won the Strega Prize for Lettere da Capri. He directed several works adapted from novels, and worked with leading Italian actresses, such as Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
and Gina Lollobrigida.Contents1 Biography 2 Legacy and honors 3 Filmography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] A native of Turin, Soldati attended the Liceo Sociale, a Jesuit school, and finished secondary school at age 17. He then studied humanities at the University of Turin. At that time, the University was a hotbed of intellectual activity and the young Soldati would meet and befriend the likes of activist and writer Carlo Levi
Carlo Levi
and journalist Giacomo Debenedetti, who were his seniors. He later studied History of Art at the University of Rome. He started publishing novels in 1929
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