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Timothy Rees
Timothy Rees
Timothy Rees
MC CR (15 August 1874 – 29 April 1939) was a Bishop of Llandaff. Timothy Rees
Timothy Rees
was a Cardiganshire man, educated at Lampeter
Lampeter
and subsequently pursued a monastic vocation at the Community of the Resurrection at Mirfield
Mirfield
in Yorkshire. When in 1931 he became Bishop of Llandaff he was the first member of a religious community to be appointed to an Anglican see in Wales for over three centuries. He was a distinguished speaker both in English and Welsh and a respected hymnographer. He was born to David Rees and his wife Catherine at Llain, Llanbadarn Trefeglwys, Cards
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John Smith (Bishop Of Llandaff)
John Smith or Smyth (died 1479) was bishop of Llandaff from 1476 to 1479. He had previously held positions as vicar of Tenby, and archdeacon of St David's. These posts are known from an inscription on the Tenby chancel wainscotting presumably erected on Smith's initiative and (in default of evidence from St. David's Cathedral registers) personally examined by Edward Yardley. He was buried in the church of the Grey Friars in London. He supplied William Worcestre with a list of Welsh saints included in Worcestre's 1478 Journeys. Sources[edit]Edward Yardley, Menevia Sacra (circa 1739-1761), ed. Francis Green (Cambrian Archaeological Association), 1927, p. . A. B. Emden, A Biographical Register of the University of Oxford to A.D. 1500, Volume III P to Z, Oxford, 1959; 1716. William Worcestre, Itineraries, ed. by John H. Harvey, Clarendon Press, 1969, p. 75.This article about a United Kingdom bishop is a stub
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Robert Holgate
Robert Holgate
Robert Holgate
(1481/1482 – 1555) was Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
from 1537 and then Archbishop of York
Archbishop of York
(from 1545 to 1554). He recognised Henry VIII as head of the Church of England. Although a protege of Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex, Holgate had a career in the Gilbertine Order
Gilbertine Order
of which he became master. He was briefly Prior
Prior
of Watton until the priory was dissolved in 1539. Most of the Gilbertine houses were lesser establishments which should have been dissolved under the Suppression of Religious Houses Act 1535 (only four out of twenty-six houses had revenues over £200 a year). However, Holgate is credited with using his influence to save them for a few years
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Robert Tideman Of Winchcombe
Robert Tideman (often Robert Tideman of Winchcombe) was a medieval Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
and Bishop of Worcester. Tideman was consecrated Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
on 13 October 1393[1] and translated to the see of Worcester on 15 June 1395.[2] Tideman [3] enjoyed influence at the court of King Richard II of England. Tideman died on 13 June 1401.[2] References[edit]^ Bishops of Llandaff, 1294–1545. British History Online. Retrieved 29 December 2008. ^ a b Bishops of Worcester, 1268–1543
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John Burghill
John Burghill (died 1414) was a medieval Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
and Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield. Burghill was nominated to Llandaff on 12 April 1396, and consecrated around 10 July 1396. He was translated to Coventry and Lichfield on 2 July 1398.[1] Burghill died as Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield
Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield
about 27 May 1414.[2] Citations[edit]^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 293 ^ Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 253References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I. (1996). Handbook of British Chronology (Third revised ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
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Thomas Peverel
Thomas Peverel (died 1419) was a medieval prelate who was successively bishop of Ossory, Llandaff, and Worcester. Peverel was appointed the Bishop of Ossory
Bishop of Ossory
by papal provision on 25 October 1395,[1] and was translated to Llandaff on 12 July 1398.[2][3] He was translated again to Worcester on 4 July 1407.[4][5] Peverel died in office on 1 or 2 March 1419.[4][5] Citations[edit]^ Fryde et al. 1986, p. 370. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, p. 293. ^ Jones 1965, p. 21–23. ^ a b Fryde et al. 1986, p. 279. ^ a b Jones 1962, p. 55–58.References[edit]Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I., eds. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd, reprinted 2003 ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.  Jones, B. (1965). "Bishops of Llandaff". Fasti Ecclesiae Anglicanae 1300–1541. Volume 11: The Welsh Dioceses. British History Online.  Jones, B. (1962)
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John Marshall (bishop)
John Marshall (or Marshal) (died 1496)[1] was a Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
in Wales. John was a fellow of Merton College, Oxford
Merton College, Oxford
and a canon of Windsor. On 6 September 1478, he was consecrated Bishop of Llandaff. He is well remembered for having repaired the damage done to the cathedral during Owain Glyndŵr's reign. He also erected a new bishop's throne and a reredos, parts of which survives
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John Ingleby (bishop)
John Ingleby (1434–1499) was Bishop of Llandaff.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Family 3 Monastic and Ecclesiastical Appointments 4 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Sir John was born on 7 July 1434, the only son of Sir William Ingleby of Ripley and Joan, daughter of Sir Brian Stapleton of Carlton.[2] He inherited the Ripley estate from his father, Sir William Ingleby, when he was only five. Sir John built the castle gatehouse at Ripley Castle
Ripley Castle
and it is still there today, having been retained after the house was rebuilt.[3] Family[edit] Sir John married a wealthy heiress, Margery Strangeways daughter of Sir James Strangways of Harlsey in Osmotherley, Yorkshire. She bore him a son and heir, William. Margery was regarded as a widow when he took holy orders. She spent eleven years raising her son before marrying Richard Welles, 7th Baron Welles
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Miles Salley
Miles Salley
Miles Salley
(died 1516) was a late 15th-century Abbot
Abbot
of Eynsham Abbey and Abingdon Abbey
Abingdon Abbey
and an early 16th-century Bishop of Llandaff. Salley was Abbot
Abbot
of Abingdon, followed by Eynsham in Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
in the 1490s, during which time he was party to a major quarrel with Sir Robert Hartcourt of Stanton Harcourt
Stanton Harcourt
which led to violent clashes between the monks and Harcourt's servants. In 1500, he was appointed Bishop of Llandaff, where he is remembered for his building work at the Bishop's Palace in Mathern
Mathern
in Monmouthshire. He also rebuilt the chancel and south aisle of The Gaunt's Chapel, Bristol, and donated the reredos.[1] Salley died in December 1516
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George De Athequa
George de Athequa was a Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
in the early days of the Reformation. A Spaniard by birth, he was chaplain to Queen Catharine of Aragon, with whom he left Spain for England. He died in March 1537. He alienated property from the see of Llandaff, notably the bishop's manor at Nash. He is thought to be one of the sources for the Spanish Chronicle. References[edit]This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Anthony Kitchin
Anthony Kitchin (22 July 1471 – 31 October 1563), also known as Anthony Dunstone, was a mid-16th-century Abbot
Abbot
of Eynsham Abbey
Eynsham Abbey
and Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
in both the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
and the Church of England. Kitchin was a monk at Westminster Abbey, before becoming Prior
Prior
of Gloucester Hall, Oxford. He was appointed Abbot
Abbot
of Eynsham in 1530, but lost the post at his abbey's dissolution in 1539. He was granted an unusually large pension of £133-6s-8d pa. Six years later, in 1545, Kitchin was made Bishop
Bishop
of Llandaff
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Hugh Lloyd (bishop)
Hugh Lloyd (born between 1586 and 1589 – 7 June 1667) was a Welsh cleric who was the Anglican bishop of Llandaff from 1660 until his death in 1667. Born in Cardiganshire, Lloyd entered Oriel College, Oxford
Oriel College, Oxford
in 1607, graduating with a BA in 1611 and an MA in 1614.[1] He is said to have become a Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford
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Hugh Jones (bishop)
Hugh Jones (1508–1574) was the bishop of Llandaff. Life[edit] Jones was descended from a family of that name from Gower, to which also belonged Sir Hugh Johnys of Llandimore. He was educated at Oxford University, probably at New Inn Hall, and was admitted to the degree of Bachelor of Civil Law on 24 July 1541, being then described as ‘chaplain.’ He was first beneficed in Wales, but on 4 January 1557 he was instituted to the vicarage of Banwell, Somerset. By 1560 he had returned to Wales, and at that date was prebendary of Llandaff and rector of Tredunnock
Tredunnock
in the same diocese.[1] On 17 April 1567 he was, on Archbishop Parker's recommendation, elected bishop of Llandaff.[2] The see was greatly impoverished, and Jones was, as Godwin has observed, the first Welshman that was preferred to it for the space of three hundred years
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William Blethyn
William Blethyn
William Blethyn
was a prebendary of York and a bishop of Llandaff. He died in 1591. Life[edit] Blethyn was reputed to have been born at Shirenewton Hall, a large country house at Shirenewton in Monmouthshire,[1] although his descendants were also said to have resided at Dinham, in a mansion on the site later occupied by Great Dinham Farm.[2] He was educated at Oxford, at either New Inn Hall or Broadgates Hall. He took orders, became archdeacon of Brecon in 1567 and also bishop of Llandaff in 1575, holding several livings at the same time in order to boost the scanty endowments of the see. [3] Blethyn made efforts to maintain the fabric of his cathedral. He died in October 1590, leaving three sons, and was buried in the church of Mathern
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Gervase Babington
Gervase Babington
Gervase Babington
(1549/1550–1610) was an English churchman, serving as the Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
(1591–1594), Bishop of Exeter (1594–1597) and Bishop of Worcester
Bishop of Worcester
in 1597–1610. He was a member of the Babington family
Babington family
and held influential offices at the same time as his cousin Anthony Babington
Anthony Babington
was executed for treason against Elizabeth I
Elizabeth I
as part of the Babington Plot.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Notes and references 4 External linksLife[edit] He was from Nottinghamshire, and sent to Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
of which he became Fellow.[1] He passed to Oxford University, where, on 15 July 1578, he was incorporated M.A. He returned to Cambridge, and was known as a 'hard student' of theology
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William Morgan (Bible Translator)
William Morgan (1545 – 10 September 1604) was Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff
and of St Asaph, and the translator of the first version of the whole Bible

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