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Timothy Colman
Sir Timothy James Alan Colman KG (born 19 September 1929) is a British businessman and a former Lord Lieutenant of Norfolk.[1] Colman is from the Colman's
Colman's
mustard family. He was educated at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, and joined the Royal Navy, leaving as a lieutenant in 1953, before commencing a business career.[2] He subsequently joined the Castaways' Club. He was chairman of the Eastern Counties Newspaper Group from 1969 to 1996.[3] Colman was appointed a Knight of the Order of the Garter
Knight of the Order of the Garter
in 1996.[4] Colman was also a yachtsman, and claimed the record for the world's fastest yacht at 26.3 knots with Crossbow, a proa at the inception of the World Sailing Speed Record Council in 1972
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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World Sailing Speed Record Council
The World Sailing Speed Record Council, founded in 1972, is the body authorized by the International Sailing Federation
International Sailing Federation
(formerly International Yacht Racing Union) to confirm speed records of sailing crafts (boats or sailboards) on water (not on ice or land). In the early years the council only dealt with claims of speed records on a one-way leg of 500 metres. Since 1988 the WSSRC is also responsible for offshore sailing records, because there were several controversial claims about the times of long voyages. One or more meetings were held every year and since 2001 the council has had a permanent secretariat. The members of the expert council from Australia, France, Great Britain
Great Britain
and the U.S. assess record claims. Record holders and their times are listed
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Salisbury Journal
The Salisbury
Salisbury
Journal is the local newspaper for the Salisbury
Salisbury
area of England.[1] Founded in 1729, it was revived by William Collins in 1736, who used it to oppose the government of Sir Robert Walpole. Benjamin Collins took over the publication of the Journal after his brother's death.[2] In the 19th century it was known as the Salisbury and Winchester Journal. The Beinecke Library of Yale University
Yale University
owns an almost unbroken run of the Journal, from No. 1, 27 November 1736 to the end of the eighteenth century.[2][3] The run of the Journal in the British Newspaper
Newspaper
Archive begins in 1762.[4] The newspaper is now part of the Newsquest
Newsquest
publishing company.[5] It contains, among other things, local news, local sport reports, cars for sale, assorted classified advertisements and government and utility notices
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Lord Lieutenant Of Wiltshire
This is a list of people who have served as Lord Lieutenant
Lord Lieutenant
of Wiltshire
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Norwich
Norwich
Norwich
(/ˈnɒrɪdʒ/,[a] also /ˈnɒrɪtʃ/ ( listen)) is a city on the River Wensum
River Wensum
in East Anglia
East Anglia
and lies approximately 100 miles (161 km) north-east of London. It is the county town of Norfolk. From the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
until the Industrial Revolution, Norwich was the largest city in England
England
after London, and one of the most important.[3] The urban area of Norwich
Norwich
had a population of 213,166 according to the 2011 Census.[4] This area extends beyond the city boundary, with extensive suburban areas on the western, northern and eastern sides, including Costessey, Taverham, Hellesdon, Bowthorpe, Old Catton, Sprowston
Sprowston
and Thorpe St Andrew. The parliamentary seats cross over into adjacent local-government districts
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Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon
Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the wife of King George VI
George VI
and the mother of Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon. She was Queen of the United Kingdom and the Dominions from her husband's accession in 1936 until his death in 1952, after which she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother,[2] to avoid confusion with her daughter. She was the last Empress of India. Born into a family of British nobility, she came to prominence in 1923 when she married the Duke of York, the second son of King George V
King George V
and Queen Mary
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Bowes-Lyon
 United Kingdom Scotland  EnglandEthnicity ScottishFounder John Lyon and Mary BowesCurrent head Simon Bowes-LyonTitlesQueen of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(suo jure) Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne Lord
Lord
of GlamisEstate(s) Glamis
Glamis
Castle (seat) Streatlam Castle GibsideThe Bowes Lyon family descended from George Bowes
George Bowes
of Gibside
Gibside
and Streatlam Castle
Streatlam Castle
(1701-1760), a County Durham
County Durham
landowner and politician, through John Bowes, 9th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghorne, chief of the Clan Lyon. Following the marriage in 1767 of the 9th Earl (John Lyon) to rich heiress Mary Eleanor Bowes, the family name was changed to Bowes by Act of Parliament
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Pascal Maka
Pascal Maka is a French windsurfer,[1] who broke the outright speed sailing record in 1986, and again in 1990.[2] Maka broke the outright speed sailing record in 1986, at Sotavento, Fuerteventura, with a speed of 38.86 knots, using a Jimmy Lewis board and a Gaastra sail.[3] This was the first time a windsurfer had broken the outright speed sailing record, which had previously been held by multihulls.[4][5] His record was surpassed in 1988 by Erik Beale, who broke the record at Saintes Maries de la Mer Speed Canal with a speed of 40.48 knots. This record lasted until 1990, when Maka again broke the record, this time also at Saintes Maries, with a speed of 43.06 knots.[6] References[edit]^ "High Winds Force Race Committee To Abandon Racing Leaving Sailors On The Ground and Kiters In The Air". ISAF. 4 July 2002.  ^ World Sailing Speed Record Council ^ History of Speed sailing IFCA ^ "Popular Science". 267 (4). Bonnier Corporation
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Catamaran
A catamaran (/ˌkætəməˈræn/) (informally, a "cat") is a multi-hulled watercraft featuring two parallel hulls of equal size. It is a geometry-stabilized craft, deriving its stability from its wide beam, rather than from a ballasted keel as with a monohull sailboat. Catamaran
Catamaran
is from a Tamil word "Kattumaram" which means logs tied together. Catamarans typically have less hull volume, higher displacement, and shallower draft (draught) than monohulls of comparable length. The two hulls combined also often have a smaller hydrodynamic resistance than comparable monohulls, requiring less propulsive power from either sails or motors. The catamaran's wider stance on the water can reduce both heeling and wave-induced motion, as compared with a monohull, and can give reduced wakes. Catamarans range in size from small (sailing or rowing vessels) to large (naval ships and car ferries)
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Royal Yacht Squadron
The Royal Yacht
Yacht
Squadron is one of the most prestigious yacht clubs in the world. Its clubhouse is Cowes Castle
Cowes Castle
on the Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
in the United Kingdom. Member yachts are given the Suffix RYS to their names, and permitted to fly the White Ensign
Ensign
of the Royal Navy[1] rather than the merchant Red Ensign
Ensign
flown by the majority of other UK registered vessels
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Knot (unit)
The knot (/nɒt/) is a unit of speed equal to one nautical mile per hour, exactly 1.852 km/h (approximately 1.15078 mph).[1] The ISO standard symbol for the knot is kn.[2] The same symbol is preferred by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE); kt is also common
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Lord Lieutenant Of Norfolk
A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations. The meaning of lieutenant differs in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces. Lieutenant
Lieutenant
may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it
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Archant
Archant
Archant
Limited is a newspaper and magazine publishing company headquartered in Norwich, England. The group publishes four daily newspapers, around 50 weekly newspapers, and 80 consumer and contract magazines. Archant
Archant
employs around 1,250 employees, mainly in East Anglia, the Home counties
Home counties
and the West Country, and was known as Eastern Counties Newspapers Group until March 2002.Contents1 History1.1 1845 to 1900 1.2 1900 to 2000 1.3 2000 to present2 Publications2.1 Daily newspapers 2.2 Weekly paid newspapers 2.3 Weekly free newspapers 2.4 Former newspapers3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] 1845 to 1900[edit] The company began publishing in Norwich
Norwich
in 1845 with Norfolk
Norfolk
News, backed by Jacob Henry Tillet, Jeremiah Colman, John Copeman and Thomas Jarrold
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Lieutenant (navy)
Lieutenant[nb 1] (abbreviated Lt, LT, LT(N), Lt(N), Lieut and LEUT, depending on nation) is a commissioned officer rank in many nations' navies. It is typically the most senior of junior officer ranks. The rank's insignia usually consists of two medium gold braid stripes and often the uppermost stripe features an executive curl. The now immediately senior rank of lieutenant commander was formerly a senior naval lieutenant rank. Many navies also use a subordinate rank of sub-lieutenant. The appointment of "first lieutenant" in many navies is held by a senior lieutenant. A navy lieutenant ranks higher than an army lieutenant; the navy rank of lieutenant is a NATO OF-2 (US grade O-3) and ranks with an army captain.Contents1 History 2 Rank insignia 3 "First lieutenant" in naval usage 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] From at least 1580,[1] the lieutenant on a ship had been the officer immediately subordinate to the captain
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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