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Timeline Of Communication Technology
Timeline
Timeline
of communication technologyContents1 Graphical overview 2 Pre 20st Century Media Impact 3 20th century 4 21st century 5 See also 6 ReferencesGraphical overview[edit]Pre 20st Century Media Impact[edit]30,000 BC – In ice-age Europe, people mark ivory, bone, and stone with patterns to keep track of time, using a lunar calendar.[1] 14,000 BC – In what is now Mezhirich, Ukraine, the first known artifact with a map on it is made using bone.[1] Prior to 3500BC –
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Timeline
A timeline is a display of a list of events in chronological order.[1] It is typically a graphic design showing a long bar labelled with dates alongside itself and usually events. Gantt Chart
Gantt Chart
is a form of timeline used in project management Timelines can use any time scale, depending on the subject and data. Most timelines use a linear scale, in which a unit of distance is equal to a set amount of time. This timescale is dependent on the events in the timeline
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Charles Fenerty
Charles Fenerty (January, 1821[2][3] – 10 June 1892), was a Canadian inventor who invented the wood pulp process for papermaking, which was first adapted into the production of newsprint.[4][5] Fenerty was also a poet (writing over 32 known poems).[6] He also did extensive travelling throughout Australia between the years 1858 to 1865 (living in the heart of the Australian gold rushes).Contents1 History of paper (before 1844) 2 Friedrich Gottlob Keller 3 Early life 4 Fenerty's invention 5 Death and legacy 6 Poems by Charles Fenerty 7 Recognition 8 Bibliography 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksHistory of paper (before 1844)[edit] Main article: History of paper Before wood pulp, paper was made from rags. Papermaking began in Egypt (see Papyrus) c.3000 B.C. In 105 AD, Cai Lun[7] a Chinese inventor, invented modern papermaking using rags, cotton, and other plant fibers by pulping it
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Printing Press
A printing press is a device for applying pressure to an inked surface resting upon a print medium (such as paper or cloth), thereby transferring the ink. It marked a dramatic improvement on earlier printing methods in which the cloth, paper or other medium was brushed or rubbed repeatedly to achieve the transfer of ink, and accelerated the process. Typically used for texts, the invention and global spread of the printing press was one of the most influential events in the second millennium.[1][2] Johannes Gutenberg, a goldsmith by profession, developed, circa 1439, a printing system by adapting existing technologies to printing purposes, as well as making inventions of his own. Printing
Printing
in East Asia had been prevalent since the Tang dynasty,[3][4] and in Europe, woodblock printing based on existing screw presses was common by the 14th century
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Ferdinand Magellan
Ferdinand Magellan
Ferdinand Magellan
(/məˈɡɛlən/[1] or /məˈdʒɛlən/;[2] Portuguese: Fernão de Magalhães, IPA: [fɨɾˈnɐ̃w dɨ mɐɣɐˈʎɐ̃jʃ]; Spanish: Fernando de Magallanes, IPA: [ferˈnando ðe maɣaˈʎanes]; c. 1480 – 27 April 1521) was a Portuguese explorer who organised the Spanish expedition to the East Indies
East Indies
from 1519 to 1522, resulting in the first circumnavigation of the Earth, completed by Juan Sebastián Elcano. Born into a Portuguese noble family in around 1480, Magellan became a skilled sailor and naval officer and was eventually selected by King Charles I of Spain
Charles I of Spain
to search for a westward route to the Maluku Islands (the "Spice Islands")
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Frequency Hopping
Frequency-hopping spread spectrum (FHSS) is a method of transmitting radio signals by rapidly switching a carrier among many frequency channels, using a pseudorandom sequence known to both transmitter and receiver. It is used as a multiple access method in the code division multiple access (CDMA) scheme frequency-hopping code division multiple access (FH-CDMA) . FHSS is a wireless technology that spreads its signal over rapidly changing frequencies. Each available frequency band is divided into sub-frequencies. Signals rapidly change ("hop") among these in a pre-determined order. Interference at a specific frequency will only affect the signal during that short interval. FHSS can, however, cause interference with adjacent direct-sequence spread spectrum (DSSS) systems
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Communication
Communication
Communication
(from Latin commūnicāre, meaning "to share"[1]) is the act of conveying intended meanings from one entity or group to another through the use of mutually understood signs and semiotic rules. The main steps inherent to all communication are: [2]The formation of communicative motivation or reason. Message
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George Antheil
George Antheil
George Antheil
(/ˈæntaɪl/; July 8, 1900 – February 12, 1959) was an American avant-garde composer, pianist, author, and inventor whose modernist musical compositions explored the modern sounds – musical, industrial, and mechanical – of the early 20th century. Spending much of the 1920s in Europe, Antheil returned to the US in the 1930s, and thereafter spent much of his time composing music for films, and eventually, television. As a result of this work, his style became more tonal. A man of diverse interests and talents, Antheil was constantly reinventing himself
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Hedy Lamarr
Hedy Lamarr
Hedy Lamarr
(/ˈhɛdi/; born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler, November 9, 1914 – January 19, 2000)[a] was an Austrian-born American film actress and inventor.[1] At the beginning of World War II, Lamarr and composer George Antheil developed a radio guidance system for Allied torpedoes, which used spread spectrum and frequency hopping technology to defeat the threat of jamming by the Axis powers.[2] Although the
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Associated Press
The Associated Press
Associated Press
(AP) is a U.S.-based not-for-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association. The AP is owned by its contributing newspapers and radio and television stations in the United States, all of which contribute stories to the AP and use material written by its staff journalists. AP's mission is to inform the world with accurate, fair, unbiased reporting. Its Statement of News Values and Principles[3] spells out its standards and practices. AP has earned 52 Pulitzer Prizes, including 31 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. AP has counted the vote in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures
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Woodblock Printing
Woodblock printing
Woodblock printing
is a technique for printing text, images or patterns used widely throughout East Asia
East Asia
and originating in China
China
in antiquity as a method of printing on textiles and later paper. As a method of printing on cloth, the earliest surviving examples from China
China
date to before 220 AD. Woodblock printing
Woodblock printing
existed in Tang China during the 7th century AD and remained the most common East Asian method of printing books and other texts, as well as images, until the 19th century. Ukiyo-e
Ukiyo-e
is the best known type of Japanese woodblock art print
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Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
(/ˌnoʊvə ˈskoʊʃə/; Latin for "New Scotland"; French: Nouvelle-Écosse; Scottish Gaelic: Alba Nuadh) is one of Canada's three maritime provinces, and one of the four provinces that form Atlantic Canada. Its provincial capital is Halifax. Nova Scotia is the second-smallest of Canada's ten provinces, with an area of 55,284 square kilometres (21,300 sq mi), including Cape Breton and another 3,800 coastal islands. As of 2016, the population was 923,598
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Pony Express (newspapers)
A pony express is a term which was used for express delivery systems which newspapers used in the 19th century to obtain news faster or publish it prior to rival publications. As with the celebrated Pony Express of 1860-61, these systems were eventually supplanted by telegraph lines.Contents1 Pony express systems 2 The telegraph defeats the horse 3 Nova Scotia Pony Express (1849) 4 ReferencesPony express systems[edit] In December 1830, three New York concerns competed to be the first to publish President Andrew Jackson's annual message to Congress -- The Journal of Commerce, the New York Courier and Enquirer, and the Association of Morning Papers. James Gordon Bennett of the Courier and Enquirer arranged for a horseback express from Washington to Baltimore, followed by a ship to Philadelphia and second horseback leg to New York City
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Newfoundland And Labrador
Newfoundland and Labrador
Labrador
(/ˈnjuːfən(d)lənd, -lænd, njuːˈfaʊndlənd ... ˈlæbrədɔːr/;[6] French: Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador; Montagnais: Akamassiss; Newfoundland Irish: Talamh an Éisc agus Labradar) is the most easterly province of Canada
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Thomas A. Watson
Thomas A Augustus Watson (January 18, 1854 – December 13, 1934) was an assistant to Alexander Graham Bell, notably in the invention of the telephone in 1876. He is best known because, as the recipient of the first telephone call – although coming from just the next room – his name became the first words ever said over the phone. "Mr. Watson – Come here – I want to see you," Bell said when first using the new invention, according to Bell's laboratory notebook.[1] There is some dispute about the actual words used, as Thomas Watson, in his own voice, remembered it as "Mr
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Cornwall
Cornwall (/ˈkɔːrnwɔːl, -wəl/;[1] Cornish: Kernow [ˈkɛrnɔʊ]) is a county in South West England in the United Kingdom. The county is bordered to the north and west by the Celtic Sea,[2] to the south by the English Channel, and to the east by the county of Devon, over the River Tamar which forms most of the border between them. Cornwall forms the westernmost part of the South West Peninsula of the island of Great Britain. The furthest southwestern point of the island is Land's End; the southernmost point is Lizard Point. Cornwall has a population of 556,000 and covers an area of 3,563 km2 (1,376 sq mi).[3][4][5][6] The county has been administered since 2009 by the unitary authority, Cornwall Council. The ceremonial county of Cornwall also includes the Isles of Scilly, which are administered separately
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