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Timeline Of Chinese History
This is a timeline of Chinese history, comprising important legal and territorial changes and political events in China
China
and its predecessor states. To read about the background to these events, see History of China. See also the list of rulers of China, Chinese emperors family tree, dynasties in Chinese history and years in China. Dates prior to 841 BC, the beginning of the Gonghe Regency, are provisional and subject to dispute. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Prehistory / Millennia: 3rd BC · 2nd BC–1st BC · 1st–2nd · 3rd · See also · Further reading · External links Prehistoric China[edit]Year Date Event780000 BC Peking Man
Peking Man
died in modern Zhoukoudian.125000-80000 BCH
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Bu Jiang
Bu Jiang (不降) was a king of ancient China, the 11th ruler of the semi-legendary Xia Dynasty.[1] He ruled 59 years.[2][3][4] Family[edit] Bu Jiang was a son of King Xie of Xia[5] and his consort and thus a grandson of King Máng and brother of King Jiōng.[6] His consort is unknown, and it is possible that he had concubines. His son was King Kǒng Jiǎ and his nephew was Jin of Xia.[7] Biography[edit] Bu Jiang is widely regarded as one of the wisest kings of Xia.[8] According to Bamboo Annals, on the 6th year of his regime, he fought with Jiuyuan.[9][10] In the 35th year of his reign, his vassal state of Shang defeated Pi (皮氏). In the 59th year of his regime he passed his throne to his younger brother Jiong. 10 years later, Bu Jiang died. Sources[edit]^ Milton Walter Meyer: China: A Concise History, page 126. ^ Cioffi-Revilla, Claudio; Lai, David (1995). "War and Politics in Ancient China, 2700 B.C.E. to 722 B.C.E.". The Journal of Conflict Resolution. 39 (3): 471–472
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Nine Tripod Cauldrons
The Nine Tripod Cauldrons
Nine Tripod Cauldrons
(Chinese: 九鼎; pinyin: Jiǔ Dǐng) were a collection of ding cast by the legendary Yu the Great
Yu the Great
of the Xia dynasty of ancient China
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Battle Of Zhuolu
The Battle of Zhuolu
Battle of Zhuolu
(simplified Chinese: 涿鹿之战; traditional Chinese: 涿鹿之戰) was the second battle in the history of China as recorded in the Records of the Grand Historian, fought between the Yanhuang
Yanhuang
tribes led by the legendary Yellow Emperor
Yellow Emperor
and the Jiuli tribes led by Chiyou.[1] The battle was fought in Zhuolu, near the present-day border of Hebei
Hebei
and Liaoning. The victory for the Yellow Emperor
Yellow Emperor
here is often credited as history, although almost everything from that time period is considered legendary
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Hmong People
The Hmong/Mong (RPA: Hmoob/Moob, Hmong pronunciation: [m̥ɔ̃ŋ]) is an indigenous people in Asia. They are also one of the sub-groups of the Miao ethnicity (苗族) in China. Thousands of economic and political refugees have resettled in Western countries in two separate waves. The first wave resettled in the late 1970s, mostly in the United States, after the North Vietnamese
North Vietnamese
and Pathet Lao
Pathet Lao
takeovers of the pro-US governments in South Vietnam
Vietnam
and Laos
Laos
respectively.[9] Since 1949, Miao has been official recognized as one of the 55 official minority groups by the government of the People's Republic of China
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Zhuolu Town
Zhuolu (Chinese: 涿鹿; pinyin: Zhuōlù; Wade–Giles: Chuo-li) is a town and the county seat of Zhuolu County, northwestern Hebei province, Northern China. It has an area of 77.21 square kilometres (29.81 sq mi) and a population of 57,400 as of 2002, 6 communities and 30 villages.[1] It is located 52 kilometres (32 mi) southeast of ZhangjiakouContents1 Historical uncertainty 2 References2.1 Notes 2.2 SourcesHistorical uncertainty[edit] Modern Zhuolu may or may not have been the location of the historical Battle of Zhuolu. However, it is promoted for tourism as such. Modern Zhuolu may or may not have been the location of what is claimed to be a city founded by the legendary Yellow Emperor, Huáng dì 黄帝, although there is evidence to support this case.[2][3] According to tradition, Zhuolu was a city that the Yellow Emperor, Huáng dì 黄帝, founded
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Emperor Zhi
Di Zhì (simplified Chinese: 帝挚; traditional Chinese: 帝摯; pinyin: Dì Zhì) or simply Zhì, was a mythological emperor of ancient China. Di was a title as in HuangDi "Yellow Emperor" and YanDi "Flame Emperor". Zhi was a son of DiKu "Emperor Ku". Di Zhi ruled for nine years (roughly 2366- 2358 BC) until he died and was succeeded by his younger half-brother Yao. Sima Qian, in the ShiJi
ShiJi
(the Records of the Grand Historian), says in its section on the "Annals of the Five Di", that Zhi reigned badly and died, and his brother FangXun, 'the highly meritorious one', then reigned under the title of Di Yao. The Bamboo Annals says that when Emperor Zhuanxu
Zhuanxu
died, a descendent of Shennong
Shennong
named ShuQe raised a disturbance, but was destroyed by the prince of Sin, who was Ku (GaoXin), a descendant of HuangDi, who then ascended to the throne
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Văn Lang
Văn Lang
Văn Lang
(Chinese: 文郎) was an early semi-legendary nation state of the Vietnamese people, thereby the predecessor to modern Vietnam. Geographically covering most of modern Northern Vietnam, it was ruled by the Hùng Kings of the Hồng Bàng dynasty. Hùng Vương
Hùng Vương
as the title of a line of kings and the Văn Lang
Văn Lang
kingdom's existence are attested in Qin and Tang-era sources.[1] The people of Văn Lang
Văn Lang
were referred to as the Lạc Việt
Lạc Việt
or sometimes simply as the Lạc. According to the 15th-century book Đại Việt
Đại Việt
sử ký toàn thư ( Đại Việt
Đại Việt
Complete History), the nation had its capital at Phong Châu in present-day Phú Thọ Province
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Great Flood (China)
The Great Flood of Gun-Yu (traditional Chinese: 鯀禹治水), also known as the Gun-Yu myth,[1] was a major flood event in ancient China that allegedly continued for at least two generations, which resulted in great population displacements among other disasters, such as storms and famine. People left their homes to live on the high hills and mounts, or nest on the trees.[2] According to mythological and historical sources, it is traditionally dated to the third millennium BCE, during the reign of Emperor Yao
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Yu The Great
Yu the Great
Yu the Great
(c. 2200 – 2100 BC)[1] was a legendary ruler in ancient China famed for his introduction of flood control, inaugurating dynastic rule in China by establishing the Xia Dynasty, and for his upright moral character.[2][3] The dates proposed for Yu's reign predate the oldest known written records in China, the oracle bones of the late Shang dynasty, by nearly a millennium.[4] No inscriptions on artifacts from the proposed era of Yu, nor the later oracle bones, make any mention of Yu; he does not appear in inscriptions until vessels dating to the Western Zhou period (c. 1045–771 BC). The lack of anything remotely close to contemporary documentary evidence has led to some controversy over the historicity of Yu
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Yellow River
The Yellow River
River
or Huang He ( listen) is the third longest river in Asia, after the Yangtze
Yangtze
River
River
and Yenisei River, and the sixth longest river system in the world at the estimated length of 5,464 km (3,395 mi).[1] Originating in the Bayan Har Mountains in Qinghai
Qinghai
province of Western China, it flows through nine provinces, and it empties into the Bohai Sea
Bohai Sea
near the city of Dongying in Shandong
Shandong
province. The Yellow River
River
basin has an east–west extent of about 1,900 kilometers (1,180 mi) and a north–south extent of about 1,100 km (680 mi). Its total drainage area is about 752,546 square kilometers (290,560 sq mi). Its basin was the birthplace of ancient Chinese civilization, and it was the most prosperous region in early Chinese history
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Yangtze
The Yangtze
Yangtze
(English: /ˈjæŋtsi/ or /ˈjɑːŋtsi/), which is 6,380 km (3,964 miles) long, is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world. The river is the longest in the world to flow entirely within one country. It drains one-fifth of the land area of the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC) and its river basin is home to nearly one-third of the country's population.[7] The Yangtze
Yangtze
is the sixth-largest river by discharge volume in the world. The English name Yangtze
Yangtze
derives from the Chinese name Yángzǐ Jiāng ( listen), which refers to the lowest 435 km of the river between Nanjing
Nanjing
and Shanghai
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Nine Provinces (China)
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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Shennong
Shennong
Shennong
(which can be variously translated as "God Farmer" or "God Peasant", " Agriculture
Agriculture
God"), also known as the Wugushen (五穀神 "Five Grains' or Five Cereals' God") or also Wuguxiandi (五穀先帝 "First Deity
Deity
of the Five Grains"), is a deity in Chinese religion, a mythical sage ruler of prehistoric China. Shennong
Shennong
has at times been counted amongst the Three Sovereigns (also known as "Three Kings" or "Three Patrons"), a group of deities or deified kings said to have lived during the early third millenium BCE, some 4,500 years ago
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Tai Kang
Tai Kang (Chinese: 太康) was the third ruler or king of the Xia Dynasty. He was the son of the King Qi of Xia and paternal grandson of Yu the Great and Queen Nu Jiao.[1] Biography[edit] Tai Kang loved to hunt and did not rule well. According to the Bamboo Annals,[2] Tai Kang took the throne in the year of Guiwei. His capital was in Zhenxin (斟鄩). In his first year, while he went hunting beyond the Luo river, Houyi came and occupied Zhenxin. Tai Kang died 4 years later, or according to the book Lushi, 10 years later. According to Records of the Grand Historian, he ruled about 19 years and lost his regime. "Taiping Yulan"[3] claims he was a tyrant who ruled for 29 years, then lost his regime and vanished. He was succeeded by his brother Zhong Kang and nephew Xiang of Xia. In some sources, Tai Kang was drowned in a lake.[4] In literature[edit] The Book of Documents features Songs of the Five Sons (五子之歌) among the documents of Xia (Chapter 8)
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Xiang Of Xia
Xiang (Chinese: 相) is the name of a ruler of the semi-legendary Xia Dynasty who is said to have reigned during the 3rd millennium BC. He was the fifth ruler of the Xia Dynasty.[1]Contents1 Biography1.1 Reign according to the Bamboo Annals 1.2 28th year of reign2 NotesBiography[edit] Xiang had been preceded on the throne of Xia by his father Zhong Kang, and before that by his uncle Tai Kang.[2] Reign according to the Bamboo Annals[edit] Xiang got his throne in the year of Wuxu and set his capital in Shangqiu. In the first year of his reign, he sent troops against the Huai Barbarians and Fei Barbarians (畎夷, aka Quanyi). In the third year, he sent troops to the Feng Barbarians and Huang Barbarians. In his 7th year, "the hordes of Yu came to make their submission", while in the 8th year, the warlord Han Zhuo killed Houyi
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