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Tim Wu
Tim Wu
Tim Wu
is an American lawyer, professor at Columbia Law School, and contributing opinion writer for the New York Times. He is best known for coining the phrase network neutrality in his 2003 paper Network Neutrality, Broadband Discrimination,[2] and popularizing the concept thereafter. Wu has also made significant contributions to antitrust policy and wireless communications policy, most notably with his "Carterfone" proposal.[3] Wu is a scholar of the media and technology industries, and his academic specialties include antitrust, copyright, and telecommunications law. Wu was named to The National Law Journal's "America's 100 Most Influential Lawyers" in 2013, as well as to the " Politico
Politico
50" in 2014 and 2015
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Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia
District of Columbia
and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States of America.[4] Founded after the American Revolution
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Seventh Circuit Court Of Appeals
The United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
(in case citations, 7th Cir.) is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the courts in the following districts:Central District of Illinois Northern District of Illinois Southern District of Illinois Northern District of Indiana Southern District of Indiana Eastern District of Wisconsin Western District of WisconsinThe court is based at the Dirksen Federal Building
Dirksen Federal Building
in Chicago, Illinois. It is one of thirteen United States courts of appeals. It is composed of eleven appellate judges. The court offers a relatively unique internet presence that includes wiki and RSS
RSS
feeds of opinions and oral arguments.[1] It is also notable for having one of the most prominent law and economics scholars, Judge Frank H
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New York Attorney General
The Attorney General of New York
Attorney General of New York
is the chief legal officer of the State of New York
State of New York
and head of the New York state government's Department of Law.[1] The office has been in existence in some form since 1626, under the Dutch colonial government of New York. The current Attorney General is Eric Schneiderman. He was elected on November 2, 2010 and took office on January 1, 2011. He won reelection in 2014.Contents1 Functions 2 Organization2.1 Chief Deputy Attorney General 2.2 Solicitor General3 Terms of office 4 List of New York State Attorneys General 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksFunctions[edit] The Attorney General advises the executive branch of state government and defends actions and proceedings on behalf of the state. The Attorney General acts independently of the Governor of New York
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Basel, Switzerland
Basel
Basel
(/ˈbɑːzəl/; also Basle /bɑːl/; German: Basel
Basel
[ˈbaːzl̩]; French: Bâle [bɑːl]; Italian: Basilea [baziˈlɛːa]) is a city in northwestern Switzerland
Switzerland
on the river Rhine. Basel
Basel
is Switzerland's third-most-populous city (after Zürich
Zürich
and Geneva) with about 175,000 inhabitants.[3] Located where the Swiss, French and German borders meet, Basel
Basel
also has suburbs in France
France
and Germany
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Toronto, Ontario
Toronto
Toronto
(/təˈrɒntoʊ/ ( listen) tə-RON-toh, locally  [təˈɹɑnoʊ] (help·info)), officially the City of Toronto, is the capital of the Canadian province of Ontario. It is located within the Golden Horseshoe
Golden Horseshoe
in Southern Ontario
Ontario
on the northern shore of Lake Ontario. With 2,731,571 residents in 2016, it is the largest city in Canada
Canada
and fourth-largest city in North America by population
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Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95CanadaFlagMotto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin) (English: "From Sea to Sea")Anthem: "O Canada"Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"[1]Capital Ottawa 45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest city TorontoOfficial languagesEnglish FrenchEthnic groupsList of ethnicities74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian[2]ReligionList of religions67.2% Christianity 23.9% Non-religious 3.2% Islam 1.5% Hinduism 1.4% Sikhism 1.1% Buddhism 1.0% Judaism 0.6% Other -[3]Demonym CanadianGovernment Federal parliamentary constitutional monarchy[4]• MonarchElizabeth II• Governor GeneralJulie Payette• Prime MinisterJustin Trudeau• Chie
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Taiwan
Taiwan
Taiwan
(/ˌtaɪˈwɑːn/ ( listen)), officially the Republic of China
China
(ROC), is a state in East Asia.[15][16][17] Its neighbors include the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC) to the west, Japan
Japan
to the northeast, and the Philippines
Philippines
to the south. It is the most populous state and largest economy that is not a member of the United Nations. The island of Taiwan, formerly known as Formosa, was inhabited by aborigines before the 17th century, when Dutch and Spanish colonies opened the island to mass Han immigration. After a brief rule by the Kingdom of Tungning, the island was annexed by the Qing dynasty, the last dynasty of China. The Qing ceded Taiwan
Taiwan
to Japan
Japan
in 1895 after the Sino-Japanese War
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University Of Toronto
The University of Toronto
Toronto
(U of T, UToronto, or Toronto) is a public research university in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on the grounds that surround Queen's Park. It was founded by royal charter in 1827 as King's College, the first institution of higher learning in the colony of Upper Canada. Originally controlled by the Church of England, the university assumed the present name in 1850 upon becoming a secular institution. As a collegiate university, it comprises eleven colleges, which differ in character and history, each with substantial autonomy on financial and institutional affairs. It has two satellite campuses in Scarborough and Mississauga. Academically, the University of Toronto
Toronto
is noted for influential movements and curricula in literary criticism and communication theory, known collectively as the Toronto
Toronto
School
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Apple II
The Apple II
Apple II
(stylized as Apple ][) is an 8-bit home computer, one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputer products,[4] designed primarily by Steve Wozniak
Steve Wozniak
( Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs
oversaw the development of the Apple II's foam-molded plastic case[5] and Rod Holt developed the switching power supply).[6] It was introduced in 1977 at the West Coast Computer Faire
West Coast Computer Faire
by Jobs and was the first consumer product sold by Apple Computer, Inc
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Computers
A computer is a device that can be instructed to carry out sequences of arithmetic or logical operations automatically. Modern computers have the ability to follow generalized sets of operations, called programs. These programs enable computers to perform an extremely wide range of tasks. Computers are used as control systems for a wide variety of industrial and consumer devices. This includes simple special purpose devices like microwave ovens and remote controls, factory devices such as industrial robots and computer assisted design, and also general purpose devices like personal computers and mobile devices such as smartphones. Early computers were only conceived as calculating devices. Since ancient times, simple manual devices like the abacus aided people in doing calculations. Early in the Industrial Revolution, some mechanical devices were built to automate long tedious tasks, such as guiding patterns for looms
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Bachelor Of Science
A Bachelor of Science
Bachelor of Science
( Latin
Latin
Baccalaureus Scientiae, B.S., BS, B.Sc., BSc, or B.Sc; or, less commonly, S.B., SB, or Sc.B., from the equivalent Latin
Latin
Scientiae Baccalaureus)[1] is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for completed courses that generally last three to five years, or a person holding such a degree.[2] Whether a student of a particular subject is awarded a Bachelor of Science degree or a Bachelor of Arts degree can vary between universities
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Justice Stephen Breyer
Stephen Gerald Breyer (/ˈbraɪ.ər/; born August 15, 1938) is an American lawyer, professor, and jurist who serves as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Appointed by President Bill Clinton in 1994, Breyer is generally associated with the more liberal side of the Court.[1] Following a clerkship with Supreme Court Associate Justice Arthur Goldberg in 1964, Breyer became well known as a law professor and lecturer at Harvard Law School, starting in 1967. There he specialized in administrative law, writing a number of influential textbooks that remain in use today
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McGill University
McGill University
University
is a coeducational public research university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada
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United States Supreme Court
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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San Francisco Bay Area
The San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay Area (referred to locally as the Bay Area) is a populous region surrounding the San Francisco, San Pablo and Suisun estuaries in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of California. Although the exact boundaries of the region vary depending on the source, the Bay Area is generally accepted to include the nine counties that border the aforementioned estuaries: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, and Sonoma. Other sources may exclude parts of or even entire counties, or include neighboring counties such as San Benito, San Joaquin, and Santa Cruz. Home to approximately 7.68 million people, Northern California’s nine-county Bay Area contains many cities, towns, airports, and associated regional, state, and national parks, connected by a complex multimodal transportation network
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