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Tiliger
The tiliger is a hybrid cross between a male tiger ( Panthera
Panthera
tigris) and a ligress (which is the hybrid offspring of a male lion and female tiger). The world's first tiligers were born on 16 August 2007 at The Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Park in Wynnewood, Oklahoma.[citation needed] Although male tigons and ligers are sterile, female hybrids can produce cubs. As with ligers, tiligers grow to a size that is typically larger than either of their tiger and lion forebears
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Wynnewood, Oklahoma
Wynnewood is a city in Garvin County, Oklahoma, United States. It is 67 miles (108 km) south of Oklahoma City. The population was 2,212 at the 2010 U.S. census,[1] compared to 2,367 at the 2000 census. Located in what was then the Chickasaw Nation of Indian Territory, it began as a village called "Walner" in 1886, on the proposed route of the Gulf, Colorado and Santa Re Railway. Railroad workers from Pennsylvania named the community for Wynnewood, a community outside of Philadelphia. The name became official on April 6, 1887.[4]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Economy 5 Media 6 Notable tornadoes 7 Notable people 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 External linksHistory[edit] Wynnewood quickly became a market town for the surrounding area. In 1887, Presbyterian missionary Mary Semple Hotchkins moved her school for Chickasaw children from Cherokee Town[a] to Wynnewood
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Oceanic Dolphin
See text.Oceanic dolphins or Delphinidae
Delphinidae
are a widely distributed family of dolphins that live in the sea. Thirty extant species are described. They include several big species whose common names contain "whale" rather than "dolphin", such as the killer whale and the pilot whales. Delphinidae
Delphinidae
is a family within the superfamily Delphinoidea, which also includes the porpoises (Phocoenidae) and the Monodontidae
Monodontidae
(beluga whale and narwhal). River dolphins are relatives of the Delphinoidea. Oceanic dolphins range in size from the 5.6-foot (1.7 m)-long and 110-pound (50 kg) Maui's dolphin
Maui's dolphin
to the 31-foot (9.4 m) and 11-short-ton (10.0 t) killer whale, the largest known dolphin. Several species exhibit sexual dimorphism; the males are larger than females. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers
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Elephantidae
Elephantidae
Elephantidae
is a family of large, herbivorous mammals collectively called elephants and mammoths. These are terrestrial large mammals with a snout modified into a trunk and teeth modified into tusks. Most genera and species in the family are extinct
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Canis
  1 C. lupus also includes domestic dogs, C. l. familiaris, and dingos, C. l. dingo Canis
Canis
mesomelas Canis
Canis
rufus Canis
Canis
simensis Canis
Canis
lycaon Canis
Canis
is a genus of the Canidae
Canidae
containing multiple extant species, such as wolves, coyotes, jackals, dingoes, and dogs. Species of this genus are distinguished by their moderate to large size, their massive, well-developed skulls and dentition, long legs, and comparatively short ears and tails.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Terminology 3 Taxonomy3.1 Canini 3.2 Canis 3.3 Evolution4 Dentition
Dentition
and biteforce 5 Behaviour5.1 Tooth breakage6 Wolves, dogs, and dingoes 7 Coyotes, jackals, and wolves 8 African migration 9 Gallery 10 See also 11 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The generic name Canis
Canis
means "dog" in Latin
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Equus (genus)
E. africanus—African wild ass E. ferus—Wild horse E. grevyi—Grévy's zebra E. hemionus—Onager E. kiang—Kiang E. quagga—Plains zebra E. zebra—Mountain zebraEquus is a genus of mammals in the family Equidae, which includes horses, donkeys, and zebras. Within Equidae, Equus is the only recognized extant genus, comprising seven living species. The term equine refers to any member of this genus, including horses. Like Equidae
Equidae
more broadly, Equus has numerous extinct species known only from fossils. The genus most likely originated in North America and spread quickly to the Old World. Equines are odd-toed ungulates with slender legs, long heads, relatively long necks, manes (erect in most subspecies) and long tails
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Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
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Camelid
Camelids are members of the biological family Camelidae, the only currently living family in the suborder Tylopoda. The extant members of this group are: dromedary camels, Bactrian camels, wild Bactrian camels, llamas, alpacas, vicuñas, and guanacos. Camelids are even-toed ungulates classified in the order Cetartiodactyla, along with pigs, whales, deer, cattle, antelope, and many others.Contents1 Characteristics 2 Evolution 3 Scientific classification 4 Phylogeny 5 Extinct genera 6 References 7 External linksCharacteristics[edit] Camelid
Camelid
feet lack functional hooves, the toe bones being embedded in a broad cutaneous pad.[1]Camelids are large, strictly herbivorous animals with slender necks and long legs. They differ from ruminants in a number of ways.[2] Their dentition show traces of vestigial central incisors in the incisive bone, and the third incisors have developed into canine-like tusks
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Bovidae
Aepycerotinae
Aepycerotinae
(1 genus) Alcelaphinae
Alcelaphinae
(4 genera)
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Sharon, Wisconsin
Sharon is a village in Walworth County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 1,605 at the 2010 census. The village is adjacent to the Town of Sharon.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics3.1 2010 census 3.2 2000 census4 Culture 5 Notable people 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The village is named after Sharon Springs, New York.[4] Geography[edit] Sharon is located at 42°30′8″N 88°43′46″W / 42.50222°N 88.72944°W / 42.50222; -88.72944 (42.502412, -88.729681).[5] According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.66 square miles (4.30 km2), all of it land.[6] Demographics[edit]Historical populationCensus Pop.%±1880 657—1890 87833.6%1900 9457.6%1910 879−7.0%1920 9083.3%1930 733−19.3%1940 81210.8%1950 1,01324.8%1960 1,16715.2%1970 1,2164.2%1980 1,2805.3%1990 1,250−2.3%2000 1,54923.9%2010 1,6053.6%Est. 2016 1,580 [3] −1.6%U.S
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White Tiger
The white tiger or bleached tiger is a pigmentation variant of the Bengal tiger, which is reported in the wild from time to time in the Indian states of Madhya Pradesh, Assam, West Bengal
West Bengal
and Bihar
Bihar
in the Sunderbans
Sunderbans
region and especially in the former State of Rewa.[1] Such a tiger has the black stripes typical of the Bengal tiger, but carries a white or near-white coat.Contents1 Variation 2 Stripeless tigers 3 Genetics3.1 Defects4 Inbreeding
Inbreeding
and outcrossing 5 In popular culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksVariationA tiger at the Madrid ZooThe white Bengal tigers are distinctive due to the color of their fur. The white fur caused by a lack of the pigment pheomelanin, which is found in Bengal tigers with orange color fur
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Siberian Tiger
formerly:P. t. amurensis P. t. altaica (Temminck, 1884) P. t. coreensis P. t. mandshurica P. t. mikadoiThe Siberian tiger
Siberian tiger
( Panthera
Panthera
tigris tigris),[3] also called Amur tiger, is a tiger population inhabiting mainly the Sikhote Alin mountain region in southwest Primorye Province in the Russian Far East. The Siberian tiger
Siberian tiger
once ranged throughout Korea, north-eastern China, Russian Far East, and eastern Mongolia. In 2005, there were 331–393 adult and subadult Siberian tigers in this region, with a breeding adult population of about 250 individuals
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The Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Foundation
The Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park, formerly known as G.W. Exotic Animal Memorial Foundation[1] and The Garold Wayne Interactive Zoological Park,[2] is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization founded in the United States. The organization's stated purpose is to provide care and shelter for exotic animals. It was founded in 1997 by the Schreibvogel Family of Springer, Oklahoma in memory of their late son Garold Schreibvogel (G.W.) who died in an automobile accident by a drunk driver.[3][4] The current president is Joe Schreibvogel.[5][6][7] The park was purchased and re-opened by Jeff Lowe, a South Carolina businessman, as the Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park LLC in 2016. However, USDA permits are still registered to Joe (Schreibvogel) Maldonado and Beth Corley for the animals on this property
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Panthera Tigris
see textTiger's historic range in about 1850 (pale yellow) and in 2006 (in green).[2]Synonyms Felis
Felis
tigris Linnaeus, 1758[3] Tigris
Tigris
striatus Severtzov, 1858 Tigris
Tigris
regalis Gray, 1867The tiger ( Panthera
Panthera
tigris) is the largest cat species, most recognizable for their pattern of dark vertical stripes on reddish-orange fur with a lighter underside. The species is classified in the genus Panthera
Panthera
with the lion, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard. Tigers are apex predators, primarily preying on ungulates such as deer and bovids. They are territorial and generally solitary but social animals, often requiring large contiguous areas of habitat that support their prey requirements
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Chordate
And see textA chordate is an animal belonging to the phylum Chordata; chordates possess a notochord, a hollow dorsal nerve cord, pharyngeal slits, an endostyle, and a post-anal tail, for at least some period of their life cycle. Chordates are deuterostomes, as during the embryo development stage the anus forms before the mouth. They are also bilaterally symmetric coelomates with metameric segmentation and a circulatory system. In the case of vertebrate chordates, the notochord is usually replaced by a vertebral column during development. Taxonomically, the phylum includes the following subphyla: the Vertebrata, which includes fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals; the Tunicata, which includes salps and sea squirts; and the Cephalochordata, which include the lancelets. There are also additional extinct taxa such as the Vetulicolia
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