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Tiger I
The Tiger I
Tiger I
 listen (help·info) is a German heavy tank of World War II
World War II
deployed from 1942 in Africa
Africa
and Europe, usually in independent heavy tank battalions. Its final designation was Panzerkampfwagen VI Tiger Ausf. E often shortened to Tiger. The Tiger I
Tiger I
gave the Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
its first armoured fighting vehicle that mounted the 8.8 cm KwK 36
8.8 cm KwK 36
gun (not to be confused with the 8.8 cm Flak 36). 1,347 were built between August 1942 and August 1944.[9] After August 1944, production of the Tiger I
Tiger I
was phased out in favour of the Tiger II. While the Tiger I
Tiger I
has been called an outstanding design for its time,[10] it was over-engineered,[11] using expensive materials and labour-intensive production methods
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Renault R40
The Renault R40 or Char léger modèle 1935 R modifié 1939 was a French light infantry tank that was used early in World War II, an improvement of the Renault R35, of which it is often considered a variant.Contents1 Development 2 Production 3 Operational history 4 Notes 5 LiteratureDevelopment[edit] In the late thirties there had been several projects to improve the Renault R35
Renault R35
light infantry tank. One of these was directed to the improvement of the horizontal rubber spring suspension system that, apart from being less reliable than originally hoped for, caused an uncomfortable ride, high track and tread wear and an unfavourable weight distribution. Apart from Lorraine, whose proposal based on Lorraine 37L
Lorraine 37L
suspension was rejected as too heavy and complicated to refit, both the AMX factory and the Renault design bureau developed from 1937 several solutions to this problem
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Type 2 Ke-To
The Type 2 Ke-To
Type 2 Ke-To
(二式軽戦車 ケト, Nishiki keisensha Ke-To) was a light tank of World War II, produced in small numbers for the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
as an improvement of the existing Type 98 Ke-Ni
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Marmon-Herrington CTLS
The Marmon-Herrington
Marmon-Herrington
Combat Tank
Tank
Light Series were a series of American light tanks/tankettes that were produced for the export market at the start of the Second World War. The CTL-3 had a crew of two and was armed with two .30 cal (7.62 mm) M1919 machine guns and one .50 cal (12.7 mm) M2 Browning machine gun. They were originally designed to be amphibious light tanks. They were rejected by the U.S. Marine Corps
U.S. Marine Corps
in 1939, but after the attack on Pearl Harbor they were exported and used as an emergency light tank. It primarily served in Alaska and the Dutch East Indies, while small numbers were used in the U.S. as guard tanks stationed along the U.S. coast
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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T-60 Tank
The T-60
T-60
scout tank was a light tank produced by the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
from 1941 to 1942. During this period, 6,292 units were built. The tank was designed to replace the obsolete T-38 amphibious scout tank.Contents1 Design 2 Gliding tank 3 Romanian TACAM and Mareșal tank destroyers 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksDesign[edit]A captured T-60
T-60
pressed into German use in the Kholm Pocket.Nicholas Astrov's design team at Moscow Factory No. 37 was assigned the task of designing amphibious and non-amphibious scout tanks in 1938. They produced the T-30A and T-30B prototypes. The former was to be manufactured as the T-40
T-40
amphibious tank starting in 1940. It also led to the T-40S (sukhoputniy, "dry-land" version), a heavier tank prototype which was considered too complex to manufacture
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T-70
The T-70
T-70
was a light tank used by the Red Army
Red Army
during World War II, replacing both the T-60
T-60
scout tank for reconnaissance and the T-50 light infantry tank for infantry support. The T-80 light tank was a more advanced version of the T-70
T-70
with a two-man turret—it was produced only in very small numbers when light tank production was abandoned.[2] The T-90 self-propelled anti-aircraft gun was a prototype vehicle with twin machine guns, based on the T-70
T-70
chassis. The T-70
T-70
was armed with a 45-mm L/46 gun Model 38 with forty-five rounds carried, and a coaxial 7.62-mm DT machine gun
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Light Tank Mk VII Tetrarch
The Light Tank
Tank
Mk VII (A17), also known as the Tetrarch, was a British light tank produced by Vickers-Armstrongs
Vickers-Armstrongs
in the late 1930s and deployed during the Second World War. The Tetrarch was originally designed as the latest in the line of light tanks built by the company for the British Army. It improved upon its predecessor, the Mk VIB Light Tank, by introducing the extra firepower of a 2-pounder gun. The War Office
War Office
ordered 70 tanks, an order that eventually increased to 220. Production was delayed by several factors, and as a consequence, only 100 to 177 of the tanks were produced.[Note 1] The tank's design flaws, combined with the decision by the War Office not to use light tanks in British armoured divisions, ruled out the use of Tetrarchs in the North African Campaign
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Type 98 Ke-Ni
The Type 98 light tank Ke-Ni (九八式軽戦車 ケニ, Kyuhachi-shiki keisensha Ke-Ni) or Type 98A Ke-Ni Ko (also known as Type 98 Chi-Ni light tank[4]) was designed to replace the Imperial Japanese Army's Type 95 Ha-Go
Type 95 Ha-Go
light tank, Japan's most numerous armored fighting vehicle during World War II. Although designed before World War II
World War II
began, production did not start until 1942, with 104 being produced by the end of the war in the Pacific.[2]Contents1 History and development 2 Design 3 Variants 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory and development[edit] The Type 98 developed in 1938 was a light tank with the same weight as the earlier Type 95 Ha-Go, but with thicker armor
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Type 2 Ka-Mi
The Special
Special
Type 2 Launch Ka-Mi (特二式内火艇 カミ, Toku-ni-shiki uchibitei kami) was the first amphibious tank of the Imperial Japanese Navy
Imperial Japanese Navy
(IJN)
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Fiat L6/40
The Fiat L6/40
Fiat L6/40
was a light tank used by the Italian army from 1940 through World War II. It was designed by Fiat-Ansaldo as an export product, and was adopted by the Italian Army when officials learned of the design and expressed interest. It was the main tank employed by the Italian forces fighting on the Eastern Front alongside the L6/40-based Semovente 47/32
Semovente 47/32
self-propelled gun. L6/40s were also used in the North African campaign. The official Italian designation was Carro Armato ("armored tank") L6/40. This designation means: "L" for Leggero (Italian: "light"), followed by the weight in tons (6) and the year of adoption (1940).Contents1 Design and development1.1 Variants2 Combat use 3 Surviving examples 4 Extended specification 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDesign and development[edit] The L6/40 was a conventional light tank design of riveted construction
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Type 4 Ke-Nu
The Type 4 Ke-Nu
Type 4 Ke-Nu
(四式軽戦車 ケヌ, Yon-shiki keisensha Kenu) was a light tank of the Imperial Japanese Army
Imperial Japanese Army
in World War II. It was a conversion of existing Type 95 Ha-Go
Type 95 Ha-Go
light tanks, re-fitted with the larger turret of the Type 97 Chi-Ha
Type 97 Chi-Ha
medium tank.Contents1 History and development 2 Design 3 Combat record 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory and development[edit] The Type 4 Ke-Nu
Type 4 Ke-Nu
was a variant of the Type 95 Ha-Go
Type 95 Ha-Go
light tank.[3] The original Type 97 Chi-Ha
Type 97 Chi-Ha
medium tank was armed with a low muzzle velocity 57 mm tank gun
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Type 5 Ke-Ho
The Type 5 light tank Ke-Ho (五式軽戦車 ケホ, Go-shiki keisensha Keho) was a prototype light tank developed by the Imperial Japanese Army at the end of World War II.Contents1 History and development 2 Design2.1 Armor 2.2 Mobility3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory and development[edit] In 1938, development began for a new light tank for the Japanese Army.[3] While the Type 95 Ha-Go
Type 95 Ha-Go
had performed well against the National Revolutionary Army
National Revolutionary Army
of the China in the Second Sino-Japanese War and successfully engaged United States
United States
M3 Stuart
M3 Stuart
light tanks on the Bataan Peninsula
Bataan Peninsula
in December 1941,[4] it was quickly growing obsolete
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Carro Armato P 40
Royal Italian Army Nazi GermanyWars World War IIProduction historyDesigned 1940Manufacturer AnsaldoProduced 1943-1944No. built 103SpecificationsWeight 26 tonnesLength 5.80 m (19 ft 0 in)Width 2.80 m (9 ft 2 in)Height 2.5 m (8 ft 2 in)Crew 4 (commander/gunner, loader, driver, radio-operator)Armour Turret: front 60 mm (2.4 in), sides and rear 45 mm (1.8 in), top 20 mm (0.8 in) Hull: front 50 mm (2.0 in), sides 45 mm (1.8 in) and rear 40 mm (1.6 in), bottom 14 mm (0.6 in)Main armamentAnsaldo 75 mm L/34 gunSecondary armament1-2 × 8 mm Breda 38
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Fiat M11/39
The Fiat-Ansaldo M11/39 was an Italian medium tank first produced prior to World War II. The M11/39 saw service in Africa
Africa
and Italy (1939–1944). The official Italian designation was Carro Armato (armoured vehicle) M11/39. The designation for the M11/39 is as follows: "M" for Medio (Italian: "medium"), followed by the weight in tonnes (11) and the year of adoption (1939).Contents1 Development 2 Combat2.1 North Africa 2.2 East Africa3 See also 4 ReferencesDevelopment[edit] The M11/39 was developed as a "breakthrough tank" (Carro di Rottura). The design of the M11/39 was influenced by the British Vickers 6-Ton. This influence is reflected particularly in the track and suspension design. A novelty of the design was the placement of the final reduction gears inside the front-mounted drive sprockets, eliminating the need for enlarged final drive housings in the bow armour
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Fiat M13/40
The Fiat-Ansaldo M13/40 was an Italian World War II
World War II
tank designed to replace the Fiat
Fiat
L3, the Fiat
Fiat
L6/40 and the Fiat
Fiat
M11/39 in the Italian Army at the start of World War II. It was the primary tank used by the Italians throughout the war. The design was influenced by the British Vickers
Vickers
6-Ton[citation needed] and was based on the modified chassis of the earlier Fiat
Fiat
M11/39. Production of the M11/39 was cut short in order to get the M13/40 into production
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