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Tianlian I-02
Tianlian I (Simplified Chinese: 天链一号, Traditional Chinese: 天鏈一號, English: Sky Chain), also known as Tian Lian 1, TL-1, and CTDRS-1 is a Chinese data tracking and relay communications satellite series. Based on the DFH-3 satellite bus, it will provide communication coverage for manned Shenzhou missions, from Shenzhou 7 onwards.[1] Functionally, it is similar to the United States
United States
Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. The first satellite of the series, Tianlian I-01, was launched on the maiden flight of the Long March 3C
Long March 3C
carrier rocket, at 15:35 GMT on 25 April 2008, from LC-2 at the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre.[2] Tianlian I-01 is able to cover around half of the spacecraft's trajectory, compared to around 12 percent which had been covered using tracking stations and a fleet of ships
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China Academy Of Space Technology
The China
China
Academy of Space Technology (CAST) (Chinese: 中国空间技术研究院; pinyin: zhōngguó kōngjiān jìshù yánjiū yuàn) is a Chinese space agency and subordinate of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC). The agency was founded on 20 February 1968 and is the main spacecraft development and production facility in China. On 24 April 1970 CAST successfully launched China's first artificial satellite Dong Fang Hong I. Space flight programmes[edit] CAST designs and manufactures the Dong Fang Hong satellites.[2] References[edit]^ " China
China
Academy of Space Technology (CAST)". NTI. Retrieved 15 December 2013.  ^ "Dongfanghong IV ready for more int'l satellite orders". Xinhua News Agency
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Shenzhou Spacecraft
Shenzhou (/ˈʃɛnˈdʒoʊ/[1] or /ʃɛnˈzuː/; Chinese: 神舟; pinyin: Shén Zhōu) is a spacecraft developed and operated by China using Soyuz technology to support its manned spaceflight program. The name is variously translated as "Divine Craft", "Divine Vessel of God", "Magic Boat" or similar and is also homophonous with an ancient name for China
China
(written 神州; meaning "Divine State"). Its design resembles the Russian Soyuz spacecraft, but it is larger in size. The first launch was on November 19, 1999 and the first manned launch was on October 15, 2003
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People's Republic Of China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Orbital Inclination
Orbital inclination
Orbital inclination
measures the tilt of an object's orbit around a celestial body. It is expressed as the angle between a reference plane and the orbital plane or axis of direction of the orbiting object. For a satellite orbiting the Earth
Earth
directly above the equator, the plane of the satellite's orbit is the same as the Earth's equatorial plane, and the satellite's orbital inclination is 0°. The general case for a circular orbit is that it is tilted, spending half an orbit over the northern hemisphere and half over the southern
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Orbital Period
The orbital period is the time a given astronomical object takes to complete one orbit around another object, and applies in astronomy usually to planets or asteroids orbiting the Sun, moons orbiting planets, exoplanets orbiting other stars, or binary stars. For objects in the Solar System, this is often referred to as the sidereal period, determined by a 360° revolution of one celestial body around another, e.g. the Earth
Earth
orbiting the Sun. The name sidereal is added as it implies that the object returns to the same position relative to the fixed stars projected in the sky. When describing orbits of binary stars, the orbital period is usually referred to as just the period
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Epoch (astronomy)
In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time used as a reference point for some time-varying astronomical quantity, such as the celestial coordinates or elliptical orbital elements of a celestial body, because these are subject to perturbations and vary with time.[1] These time-varying astronomical quantities might include, for example, the mean longitude or mean anomaly of a body, the node of its orbit relative to a reference plane, the direction of the apogee or aphelion of its orbit, or the size of the major axis of its orbit. The main use of astronomical quantities specified in this way is to calculate other relevant parameters of motion, in order to predict future positions and velocities
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Chinese Space Program
The space program of the People's Republic of China
China
is directed by the China National Space Administration
China National Space Administration
(CNSA). Its technological roots can be traced back to the late 1950s, when China
China
began a ballistic missile program in response to perceived American (and, later, Soviet) threats. However, the first Chinese crewed space program only began several decades later, when an accelerated program of technological development culminated in Yang Liwei's successful 2003 flight aboard Shenzhou 5. This achievement made China
China
the third country to independently send humans into space. Plans currently include a permanent Chinese space station
Chinese space station
in 2020 and crewed expeditions to the Moon. Officials have articulated long term ambitions to exploit Earth-Moon space for industrial development
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Long March
The Long March
Long March
(October 1934 – October 1935) was a military retreat undertaken by the Red Army of the Communist Party of China, the forerunner of the People's Liberation Army, to evade the pursuit of the Kuomintang
Kuomintang
(KMT or Chinese Nationalist Party) army. There was not one Long March, but a series of marches, as various Communist armies in the south escaped to the north and west. The best known is the march from Jiangxi
Jiangxi
province which began in October 1934. The First Front Army of the Chinese Soviet Republic, led by an inexperienced military commission, was on the brink of annihilation by Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek's troops in their stronghold in Jiangxi
Jiangxi
province
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Long March Rocket
A Long March rocket (simplified Chinese: 长征系列运载火箭; traditional Chinese: 長征系列運載火箭; pinyin: Chángzhēng xìliè yùnzài huǒjiàn) or Changzheng rocket in Chinese pinyin is any rocket in a family of expendable launch systems operated by the People's Republic of China. Development and design falls under the auspices of the China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology. In English, the rockets are abbreviated as LM- for export and CZ- within China, as "Chang Zheng" means "Long March" in Chinese pinyin
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Xi'an Satellite Control Centre
The Xi'an Satellite Monitor and Control Center (Chinese:西安卫星测控中心, XSCC), also known as Base 26, is the primary satellite control facility of the People's Republic of China.[1] The facility was established in Weinan as the "Satellite Survey Department" in 1967, and relocated to Xi'an in 1987.[2][3][4] Today, the XSCC comprises a mission control station in Xi'an and a set of tracking arrays located outside the city on a mountain plateau. The tracking station is equipped with antenna farms, masts, and communications dishes, while the mission control station is equipped with television screens, consoles, plotters, and high-speed computers that allow technicians to trace the orbital paths of all Chinese satellites in orbit.[2] See also[edit]Beijing Aerospace Command and Control Center Chinese Space ProgramReferences[edit]^ "Base 26 Xian Satellite Monitor and Control Center (XSCC)". Federation of American Scientists. June 19, 1998
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China Daily
China Daily
China Daily
(Chinese: 《中国日报》; pinyin: Zhōngguó Rìbào) is an English-language
English-language
daily newspaper published in the People's Republic of China.Contents1 Overview 2 Sections 3 Digital Media 4 International editions4.1
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Xichang Launch Complex 2
The Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC), also known as the Xichang Space Center, is a People's Republic of China space vehicle launch facility (spaceport) approximately 64 kilometres (40 miles) northwest of Xichang, Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture in Sichuan. The facility became operational in 1984 and is primarily used to launch powerful thrust rockets and geostationary communications and weather satellites. It is notable as the site of Sino-European space cooperation, with the launch of the first of two Double Star scientific satellites in December 2003. Chinese officials have indicated interest in conducting additional international satellite launches from XSLC.[1] In 1996, a fatal accident occurred when the rocket carrying the Intelsat 708 satellite failed on launch from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Gaofen
Gaofen-1 (Chinese: 高分一号; pinyin: Gāofēn Yī hào) is a high resolution Chinese Earth observation satellite. Gaofen-1 was launched on April 26, 2013 at 4:13 UTC with a Long March 2D carrier rocket from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center
Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center
along with the three small experimental satellites: Turksat 3USat (Turkey), CubeBug-1 (Argentina) and NEE-01 Pegaso
NEE-01 Pegaso
(Ecuador) in a sun-synchronous orbit.[1] The civilian HDEOS (High-Definition Earth Observation Satellite) program was proposed in 2006 and received approval in 2010. Gaofen-1 is the first of six planned HDEOS spacecraft to be launched between 2013 and 2016
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Fanhui Shi Weixing
Fanhui Shi Weixing (simplified Chinese: 返回式卫星; traditional Chinese: 返回式衛星; pinyin: Fǎnhuí Shì Wèixīng; literally: "recoverable satellite") is a series of Chinese recoverable reconnaissance satellites. The satellites were used for both military and civilian observation needs, with a total of 26 flights. The first flight was FSW-0 on 1969-06-01 and the last SJ-8 on 2006-09-09. Four models of the satellites were introduced: FSW-0, FSW-1, FSW-2, and the most modern being FSW-3
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