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Tianlian I
Tianlian I (Simplified Chinese: 天链一号, Traditional Chinese: 天鏈一號, English: Sky Chain), also known as Tian Lian 1, TL-1, and CTDRS-1 is a Chinese data tracking and relay communications satellite series. Based on the DFH-3 satellite bus, it will provide communication coverage for manned Shenzhou missions, from Shenzhou 7 onwards.[1] Functionally, it is similar to the United States
United States
Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. The first satellite of the series, Tianlian I-01, was launched on the maiden flight of the Long March 3C
Long March 3C
carrier rocket, at 15:35 GMT on 25 April 2008, from LC-2 at the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre.[2] Tianlian I-01 is able to cover around half of the spacecraft's trajectory, compared to around 12 percent which had been covered using tracking stations and a fleet of ships
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Apsis
An apsis (Greek: ἁψίς; plural apsides /ˈæpsɪdiːz/, Greek: ἁψῖδες) is an extreme point in an object's orbit
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Carrier Rocket
In spaceflight, a launch vehicle or carrier rocket is a rocket used to carry a payload from Earth's surface into outer space. A launch system includes the launch vehicle, the launch pad, and other infrastructure.[1] Although a carrier rocket's payload is often an artificial satellite placed into orbit, some spaceflights, such as sounding rockets, are sub-orbital, while others enable spacecraft to escape Earth orbit entirely. Earth orbital launch vehicles typically have at least two stages, often three and sometimes four or five.Contents1 Types1.1 By launch platform 1.2 By size 1.3 Suborbital 1.4 Orbital 1.5 Translunar and interplanetary2 Return to launch site 3 Distributed launch 4 Assembly 5 Regulation 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksTypes[edit]A Saturn V
Saturn V
launch vehicle sends Apollo 15
Apollo 15
on its way to the Moon.Expendable launch vehicles are designed for one-time use
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Long March
The Long March
Long March
(October 1934 – October 1935) was a military retreat undertaken by the Red Army of the Communist Party of China, the forerunner of the People's Liberation Army, to evade the pursuit of the Kuomintang
Kuomintang
(KMT or Chinese Nationalist Party) army. There was not one Long March, but a series of marches, as various Communist armies in the south escaped to the north and west. The best known is the march from Jiangxi
Jiangxi
province which began in October 1934. The First Front Army of the Chinese Soviet Republic, led by an inexperienced military commission, was on the brink of annihilation by Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek's troops in their stronghold in Jiangxi
Jiangxi
province
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
and other information on the Internet
Internet
created by the Internet
Internet
Archive, a nonprofit organization, based in San Francisco, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Technical details2.1 Storage capabilities 2.2 Growth 2.3 Website exclusion policy2.3.1 Oakland Archive
Archive
Policy3 Uses3.1 In legal evidence3.1.1 Civil litigation3.1.1.1 Netbula LLC v. Chordiant Software Inc. 3.1.1.2 Telewizja Polska3.1.2 Patent law 3.1.3 Limitations of utility4 Legal status 5 Archived content legal issues5.1 Scientology 5.2 Healthcare Advocates, Inc. 5.3 Suzanne Shell 5.4 Daniel Davydiuk6 Censorship and other threats 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Gaofen
Gaofen-1 (Chinese: 高分一号; pinyin: Gāofēn Yī hào) is a high resolution Chinese Earth observation satellite. Gaofen-1 was launched on April 26, 2013 at 4:13 UTC with a Long March 2D carrier rocket from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center
Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center
along with the three small experimental satellites: Turksat 3USat (Turkey), CubeBug-1 (Argentina) and NEE-01 Pegaso
NEE-01 Pegaso
(Ecuador) in a sun-synchronous orbit.[1] The civilian HDEOS (High-Definition Earth Observation Satellite) program was proposed in 2006 and received approval in 2010. Gaofen-1 is the first of six planned HDEOS spacecraft to be launched between 2013 and 2016
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Epoch (astronomy)
In astronomy, an epoch is a moment in time used as a reference point for some time-varying astronomical quantity, such as the celestial coordinates or elliptical orbital elements of a celestial body, because these are subject to perturbations and vary with time.[1] These time-varying astronomical quantities might include, for example, the mean longitude or mean anomaly of a body, the node of its orbit relative to a reference plane, the direction of the apogee or aphelion of its orbit, or the size of the major axis of its orbit. The main use of astronomical quantities specified in this way is to calculate other relevant parameters of motion, in order to predict future positions and velocities
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Orbital Period
The orbital period is the time a given astronomical object takes to complete one orbit around another object, and applies in astronomy usually to planets or asteroids orbiting the Sun, moons orbiting planets, exoplanets orbiting other stars, or binary stars. For objects in the Solar System, this is often referred to as the sidereal period, determined by a 360° revolution of one celestial body around another, e.g. the Earth
Earth
orbiting the Sun. The name sidereal is added as it implies that the object returns to the same position relative to the fixed stars projected in the sky. When describing orbits of binary stars, the orbital period is usually referred to as just the period
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Orbital Inclination
Orbital inclination
Orbital inclination
measures the tilt of an object's orbit around a celestial body. It is expressed as the angle between a reference plane and the orbital plane or axis of direction of the orbiting object. For a satellite orbiting the Earth
Earth
directly above the equator, the plane of the satellite's orbit is the same as the Earth's equatorial plane, and the satellite's orbital inclination is 0°. The general case for a circular orbit is that it is tilted, spending half an orbit over the northern hemisphere and half over the southern
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People's Republic Of China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Geocentric Orbit
A geocentric orbit or Earth
Earth
orbit involves any object orbiting Planet Earth, such as the Moon
Moon
or artificial satellites
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Xichang Satellite Launch Center
In the context of spaceflight, a satellite is an artificial object which has been intentionally placed into orbit. Such objects are sometimes called artificial satellites to distinguish them from natural satellites such as Earth's Moon. In 1957 the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
launched the world's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1. Since then, about 6,600 satellites from more than 40 countries have been launched. According to a 2013 estimate, 3,600 remained in orbit.[1] Of those, about 1,000 were operational;[2] while the rest have lived out their useful lives and become space debris. Approximately 500 operational satellites are in low-Earth orbit, 50 are in medium-Earth orbit (at 20,000 km), and the rest are in geostationary orbit (at 36,000 km).[3] A few large satellites have been launched in parts and assembled in orbit
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HaiYang
Haiyang
Haiyang
(simplified Chinese: 海阳; traditional Chinese: 海陽; pinyin: Hǎiyáng), a coastal city in the peninsula province of Shandong
Shandong
in eastern China, is strategically located[citation needed] in the center of the prime tourist trio of Qingdao, Yantai, and Weihai. Haiyang's claim to fame[citation needed] comes from its extensive sea beaches, national forest parks, wetland reserves, as well as its beautiful beach[citation needed] and yachting opportunities
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Satellite Catalog Number
The Satellite
Satellite
Catalog Number (also known as NORAD
NORAD
Catalog Number, NORAD
NORAD
ID, NASA catalog number, USSPACECOM object number or simply catalog number and similar variants) is a sequential 5-digit number assigned by USSPACECOM (United States Space Command) to all Earth orbiting satellites in order of identification. Before USSPACECOM, the catalog was maintained by NORAD. The first catalogued object, catalog number 00001, is the Sputnik 1
Sputnik 1
launch vehicle, with the Sputnik 1 satellite assigned catalog number 00002.[1] As of August 2017[update], the National Space Science Data Center Master Catalog listed more than 42,900 tracked objects including more than 7,800 satellites launched into orbit since 1957.[2] See also[edit]International DesignatorReferences[edit]^ "SL-1 R/B Satellite
Satellite
details 1957-001A NORAD
NORAD
1"
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International Designator
The International Designator, also known as COSPAR designation, and in the United States as NSSDC ID, is an international naming convention for satellites. It consists of the launch year, a 3-digit incrementing launch number of that year and up to a 3-letter code representing the sequential identifier of a piece in a launch.[citation needed] For example, 1990-037A is the Space Shuttle Discovery
Space Shuttle Discovery
on mission STS-31, which carried the Hubble Space Telescope
Hubble Space Telescope
(1990-037B) into space. This launch was the 37th known successful launch worldwide in 1990. The number reveals that it was launched in 1990 and that it was the 37th launch made that year
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Shiyan
442000 (Urban center) 442100-442300, 442500-442700 (Other areas)Area code(s) 719License Plate 鄂CCamphor Laurel Cinnamomum camphora L. Sieb. Southern magnolia Magnolia grandiflora L.Blossom of pomegranate Punica granatum L. Chinese Rose Rosa chinensis Shiyan
Shiyan
(Chinese: 十堰; pinyin: Shíyàn) is a prefecture-level city in northwestern Hubei
Hubei
province, China, bordering Henan
Henan
to the northeast, Chongqing
Chongqing
to the southwest, and Shaanxi
Shaanxi
to the north and west. At the 2010 census, its population was 3,340,841 of whom 767,920 lived in the built-up (or metro) area ade of Maojian and Zhangwan urban districts on 1,193 square kilometres (461 square miles)
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