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Threatened Mammals Of Europe
The list below contains threatened mammals that dwell in or migrate to any region in Europe, the East Atlantic Ocean, and any nearby islands of the Atlantic Ocean. This includes mammals that are found in the East Atlantic Ocean (Azores), Iceland, the Adriatic Sea, the Sea of Azov, the Black and Caspian Sea, Corsica, Cyprus, Palearctic, Russia, Eurasia, North African Coast, the Mediterranean Sea and islands located in the Mediterranean Sea, and the islands of Spain (Canary, Balearic). The list below was compiled from data on the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species (IUCN)
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Physeter Macrocephalus
Physeter catodon Linnaeus, 1758 Physeter australasianus Desmoulins, 1822The sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) or cachalot /ˈkæʃəˌlɒt, ˈkæʃəˌloʊ/ is the largest of the toothed whales and the largest toothed predator. It is the only living member of genus Physeter and one of three extant species in the sperm whale family, along with the pygmy sperm whale and dwarf sperm whale of the genus Kogia. The sperm whale is a pelagic mammal with a worldwide range, and will migrate seasonally for feeding and breeding.[3] Females and young males live together in groups while mature males live solitary lives outside of the mating season. The females cooperate to protect and nurse their young. Females give birth every four to twenty years, and care for the calves for more than a decade
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Galemys Pyrenaicus
      Galemys
Galemys
pyrenaicus rufulusThe Pyrenean desman
Pyrenean desman
( Galemys
Galemys
pyrenaicus) is a small semiaquatic nocturnal mammal related to moles and shrews, and is one of only two surviving species of the tribe Desmanini. The range of the species centers on northwestern Spain and northern Portugal, but it is under threat due to changes to its habitat. In Portugal it is called "toupeira-d'água", which means "water mole".Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Habitat 4 Conservation 5 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit] Along with the Russian desman
Russian desman
( Desmana
Desmana
moschata), it belongs to the tribe Desmanini
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Balaenoptera Physalus
The fin whale ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
physalus), also known as finback whale or common rorqual and formerly known as herring whale or razorback whale, is a marine mammal belonging to the parvorder of baleen whales. It is the second-largest mammalian on the Earth after the blue whale.[7] The largest reportedly grow to 27.3 m (89.6 ft) long[8] with a maximum confirmed length of 25.9 m (85 ft),[9] a maximum recorded weight of nearly 74 tonnes (73 long tons; 82 short tons),[10] and a maximum estimated weight of around 114 tonnes (112 long tons; 126 short tons). American naturalist Roy Chapman Andrews
Roy Chapman Andrews
called the fin whale "the greyhound of the sea ... for its beautiful, slender body is built like a racing yacht and the animal can surpass the speed of the fastest ocean steamship."[11] The fin whale's body is long and slender, coloured brownish-grey with a paler underside
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Bison Bonasus
The European bison (Bison bonasus), also known as wisent (/ˈviːzənt/ or /ˈwiːzənt/) or the European wood bison, is a Eurasian species of bison. It is one of two extant species of bison, alongside the American bison. Three subspecies existed in the recent past, but only one survives today. The species is, theoretically, descended from a hybrid, a cross between a female aurochs, the extinct wild ancestor of modern cattle, and a male Steppe bison; the possible hybrid is referred to informally as the Higgs bison.[2][3] Alternatively, the Pleistocene woodland bison has been suggested as the ancestor to the species.[4][5] European bison were hunted to extinction in the wild in the early 20th century, with the last wild animals of the B. b. bonasus subspecies being shot in the Białowieża Forest (on the Belarus-Poland border) in 1921, and the last of B. b. caucasus in the northwestern Caucasus in 1927.[6] B. b. hungarorum was hunted to extinction in the mid-1800s
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Bos Primigenius Primigenius
Wild:†Bos primigenius primigenius   (Bojanus, 1827) †Bos primigenius namadicus   (Falconer, 1859) †Bos primigenius africanus   (Thomas, 1881)domestic:Bos primigenius taurus   (Linnaeus, 1758) Bos primigenius indicus   (Linnaeus, 1758)Distribution of the three subspeciesSynonymsListBos mauretanicus Thomas, 1881 Bosurus minutus v. D. Malsburg, 1911 Bos namadicus Falconer, 1859 Bos taurus Bos indicus Bos urusThe aurochs (/ˈɔːrɒks/ or /ˈaʊrɒks/; pl. aurochs, or rarely aurochsen, aurochses), also urus, ure (Bos primigenius), is an extinct species of large wild cattle that inhabited Europe, Asia, and North Africa
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Crocidura Canariensis
The Canarian shrew (Crocidura canariensis) is a species of mammal in the family Soricidae. It is endemic to the Canary Islands. Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical dry shrubland. It is threatened by habitat loss.[1] References[edit]^ a b Hutterer, R. (2004). "Crocidura canariensis". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2007. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 2007-07-30. External links[edit]Canarian shrew media at ARKive v t eExtant species of SoricomorphaKingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Infraclass: Eutheria Superorder: LaurasiatheriaFamily: Soricidae subfamily: CrocidurinaeCrocidura (White-toothed shrews)Cyrenaica shrew (C. aleksandrisi) East African highland shrew (C. allex) Andaman shrew (C. andamanensis) C. annamitensis Ansell's shrew (C. ansellorum) Arabian shrew (C. arabica) Jackass shrew (C. arispa) Armenian shrew (C. armenica) Asian gray shrew (C. attenuata) Hun shrew (C
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Crocidura Zimmermanni
The Cretan shrew (Crocidura zimmermanni) is a species of mammal in the family Soricidae. It is endemic and exclusive to the island of Crete, Greece. Its natural habitat is temperate shrubland, and the animal is threatened by habitat loss. It is found in the mountainous highlands of Crete, having been displaced from lower altitudes by the lesser white-toothed shrew (Crocidura suaveolens). References[edit]^ Vohralík, V. (2008). "Crocidura zimmermanni". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2008: e.T5588A11369187. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2008.RLTS.T5588A11369187.en. Retrieved 8 December 2017. v t eExtant species of SoricomorphaKingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Infraclass: Eutheria Superorder: LaurasiatheriaFamily: Soricidae subfamily: CrocidurinaeCrocidura (White-toothed shrews)Cyrenaica shrew (C. aleksandrisi) East African highland shrew (C. allex) Andaman shrew (C. andamanensis) C. annamitensis Ansell's shrew (C. ansellorum) Arabian shrew (C
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Cystophora Cristata
The hooded seal (Cystophora cristata) is a large phocid found only in the central and western North Atlantic, ranging from Svalbard
Svalbard
in the east to the Gulf of St. Lawrence
Gulf of St. Lawrence
in the west
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Dinaromys Bogdanovi
D. b. bogdanovi D. b. coeruleus D. b. grebenscikovi D. b. korabensis D. b. longipedis D. b. marakovici D. b. preniensis D. b. trebevicensisThe Balkan snow vole, Dinaromys bogdanovi, also known as Martino's snow vole is the only member of the genus Dinaromys. Eight subspecies of this vole have been recognized from southern parts of Europe. The genus name means "Dinaric mouse", referring to the Dinaric Alps. The Balkan Snow Vole is a living fossil, the only living genus in the tribe Pliomyini and might arguably better be placed in Pliomys, a genus established for its fossil relatives even before the Balkan Snow Vole was scientifically described. References[edit]^ Kryštufek, B. (2008). "Dinaromys bogdanovi". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 24 May 2009.  Database entry includes a brief justification of why this species is of vulnerable."Dinaromys"
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Equus Ferus Przewalskii
hagenbecki Matschie, 1903 prjevalskii Ewart, 1903 typicus Max Hilzheimer (de), 1909Przewalski's Horse
Horse
in the Chernobyl Exclusion ZoneThe Przewalski's horse
Przewalski's horse
(/(p)ʃəˈvɑːlski/ (p)shə-VAHL-skee;[2]
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Przewalski's Horse
hagenbecki Matschie, 1903 prjevalskii Ewart, 1903 typicus Max Hilzheimer (de), 1909Przewalski's Horse
Horse
in the Chernobyl Exclusion ZoneThe Przewalski's horse
Przewalski's horse
(/(p)ʃəˈvɑːlski/ (p)shə-VAHL-skee;[2] Polish:&
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Eubalaena Glacialis
The North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis), which means "good, or true, whale of the ice") is a baleen whale, one of three right whale species belonging to the genus Eubalaena,[1] all of which were formerly classified as a single species. Because of their docile nature, their slow surface-skimming feeding behaviors, their tendencies to stay close to the coast, and their high blubber content (which makes them float when they are killed, and which produced high yields of whale oil), right whales were once a preferred target for whalers. At present, they are among the most endangered whales in the world,[6] and they are protected under the U.S. Endangered Species Act and Marine Mammal Protection Act and Canada's Species at Risk Act. There are about 400 individuals in existence in the western North Atlantic Ocean – they migrate between feeding grounds in the Labrador Sea and their winter calving areas off Georgia and Florida, an ocean area with heavy shipping traffic
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Hydropotes Inermis
The water deer (Hydropotes inermis) is a small deer superficially more similar to a musk deer than a true deer. Native to China and Korea, there are two subspecies: the Chinese water deer (Hydropotes inermis inermis) and the Korean water deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus). Despite its lack of antlers and certain other anatomical anomalies—including a pair of prominent tusks (downward-pointing canine teeth), it is classified as a cervid. Its unique anatomical characteristics have caused it to be classified in its own genus (Hydropotes) as well as its own subfamily (Hydropotinae).[2] However, studies of mitochondrial control region and cytochrome b DNA sequences placed it near Capreolus within an Old World section of the subfamily Capreolinae.[3][4] Its prominent tusks (elongated canines), similar to those of musk deer, have led to both being colloquially named vampire deer in English-speaking areas to which they have been imported
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Balaenoptera Borealis
The sei whale (/ˈseɪ/ or /ˈsaɪ/) ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
borealis) is a baleen whale, the third-largest rorqual after the blue whale and the fin whale.[3] It inhabits most oceans and adjoining seas, and prefers deep offshore waters.[4] It avoids polar and tropical waters and semienclosed bodies of water
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Lepus Castroviejoi
The broom hare (Lepus castroviejoi) is a species of hare endemic to northern Spain. It is restricted to the Cantabrian Mountains in northern Spain between the Serra dos Ancares and the Sierra de Peña Labra. This region is about 230 km (140 mi) from east to west and 25–40 km (16–25 mi) from north to south. It lives in mountains at elevations up to 2,000 m (6,600 ft), though it descends during the winter to avoid the colder temperatures and snow. Its preferred habitat is heathland, containing mainly Erica, Calluna, and Vaccinium, with much shrub cover of Cytisus, Genista, and Juniperus. It also inhabits clearings in mixed deciduous forests of oak and beech. The broom hare body length ranges from 45–65 cm (18–26 in). Its tail grows to lengths of 5–10 cm (2.0–3.9 in). Its front legs grow from 10–20 cm (3.9–7.9 in) and the back legs can grow from 20–30 cm (7.9–11.8 in)
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