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Thomas Young Oration
The Young Medal and Prize is a prize awarded on odd numbered years by the Institute of Physics
Institute of Physics
in the memory of Thomas Young for distinguished research in the field of optics, including physics outside the visible region. [1] Originally established by the Optical Society in 1907 as the Thomas Young Oration 'on an optical subject', the orator was later chosen by the Physical Society after the two societies had merged in 1932 and subsequently converted to a medal and prize after the Physical Society had in turn merged with the Institute of Physics
Institute of Physics
in 1960. Recipients[edit] Source: Institute of Physics2017 - Kishan Dholakia 2015 - Nikolay I. Zheludev 2013 - Jeremy Baumberg 2011 - Ian A Walmsley 2009 - Leslie Allen and Miles Padgett 2008 - Patrick Gill 2007 - J
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Institute Of Physics
The Institute of Physics
Institute of Physics
(IOP) is a scientific charity that works to advance physics education, research and application.[4] It has a worldwide membership of over 50,000.[5] The IOP supports physics in education, research and industry.[6] In addition to this, the IOP provides services to its members including careers advice and professional development and grants the professional qualification of Chartered
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Marius Tscherning
Marius Hans Erik Tscherning (11 December 1854, in Østrup near Odense – 1 September 1939) was a Danish ophthalmologist. He studied ophthalmology under Edmund Hansen Grut (1831-1907) in Copenhagen, later becoming an adjunct director at the ophthalmological laboratory at the Sorbonne in Paris. Tscherning spent 25 years at the Sorbonne, where he worked closely with Louis Émile Javal (1839-1907). In 1910 he returned to Denmark as a professor at the University of Copenhagen and head of the ophthalmic department at the Rigshospitalet.[1] Tscherning is remembered for contributions made in optical physiology. He conducted research of entoptic phenomenon, Purkinje images, the etiology of myopia, and Listing's law of ocular movement
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Frederic Bartlett
Sir Frederic Charles Bartlett FRS[1] (20 October 1886 – 30 September 1969) was a British psychologist and the first professor of experimental psychology at the University of Cambridge
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Malcolm MacLeod (British Army Officer)
Major-General Malcolm Neynoe MacLeod (23 May 1882–1 August 1969) was Director General of the Ordnance Survey from 1935 to 1943. In 1935 he started the retriangulation of Great Britain, an immense task which involved erecting concrete triangulation pillars (trig points) on prominent (often inaccessible) hilltops throughout Britain. As well as being an immense physical task, it was also an extremely complex mathematical undertaking. MacLeod can fairly be said to be the creator of the Ordnance Survey in its modern form. MacLeod was commissioned in the Royal Engineers in 1900, serving in India from 1902 until 1914. During World War I he commanded the 4th Field Survey Battalion. He became Chief Instructor at the School of Artillery, Larkhill in 1920, serving until 1923 when he moved to the Ordnance Survey
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Charles Fabry
Maurice Paul Auguste Charles Fabry
Charles Fabry
ForMemRS[1][2] (French: [fabʁi]; 11 June 1867 – 11 December 1945) was a French physicist.[3][4]Contents1 Life 2 Career 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Fabry graduated from the École Polytechnique
École Polytechnique
in Paris
Paris
and received his doctorate from the University of Paris
Paris
in 1892, for his work on interference fringes, which established him as an authority in the field of optics and spectroscopy. In 1904, he was appointed Professor of Physics at the University of Marseille, where he spent 16 years. Career[edit] In optics, he discovered an explanation for the phenomenon of interference fringes
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Herbert Eugene Ives
Herbert Eugene Ives (July 21, 1882 – November 13, 1953) was a scientist and engineer who headed the development of facsimile and television systems at AT&T in the first half of the twentieth century.[1] He is best known for the 1938 Ives–Stilwell experiment, which provided direct confirmation of special relativity's time dilation,[2] although Ives himself did not accept special relativity, and argued instead for an alternative interpretation of the experimental results.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Awards and honors 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Ives was born on July 21, 1882 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Frederic Eugene Ives and Mary Olmstead. He studied at the University of Pennsylvania and the Johns Hopkins University, where he graduated in 1908
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John Herbert Parsons
Sir John Herbert Parsons CBE FRS FRCS (3 September 1863, Bristol
Bristol
– 7 October 1957, University College Hospital, London) was an ophthalmologist and ophthalmic surgeon.[1][2]Contents1 Education 2 Career and research2.1 Awards and honours 2.2 Selected works3 ReferencesEducation[edit] Parsons was educated at the University of Bristol,[citation needed] University College London,[citation needed] and at St Bartholomew's Hospital. He received in 1890 his BSc in physiology, in 1891 his MRCS, and in 1892 his MB. Career and research[edit] He was appointed an assistant in the Department of Physiology at University College London
University College London
and practised medicine for several years in Finchley. He then became a clinical assistant at Moorfields Eye Hospital. In 1900 he received the MB London and the FRCS England
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George Willis Ritchey
George Willis Ritchey
George Willis Ritchey
(December 31, 1864 – November 4, 1945) was an American optician and telescope maker and astronomer born at Tuppers Plains, Ohio. Ritchey was educated as a furniture maker. He coinvented the Ritchey-Chrétien(R-C) reflector telescope along with Henri Chrétien. The R-C prescription remains the predominant optical design for telescopes and has since been used for the majority of major ground-based and space-based telescopes. He worked closely with George Ellery Hale, first at Yerkes Observatory and later at Mt. Wilson Observatory. He played a major role in designing the mountings and making the mirrors of the Mt. Wilson 60-inch (1.5 m) and 100-inch (2.5 m) telescopes. Hale and Ritchey had a falling out in 1919, and Ritchey eventually went to Paris where he promoted the construction of very large telescopes
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Moritz Von Rohr
Moritz von Rohr
Moritz von Rohr
(4 April 1868 – 20 June 1940) was an optical scientist at Carl Zeiss in Jena, Germany. A street in Jena
Jena
is named after him: Moritz-von-Rohr-Straße, near Carl-Zeiss-Promenade and Otto-Schott-Straße.Contents1 Life 2 Inventions 3 Publications 4 Photographs 5 References 6 External linksLife[edit] Moritz von Rohr
Moritz von Rohr
was born in Lonzyn near Hohensalza, then part of the Prussian Grand Duchy of Posen, but now in Poland
Poland
and known as Łążyn, near Inowrocław. He obtained a doctorate of philosophy at the University of Berlin in 1892.[1] Inventions[edit] Von Rohr is usually credited with the design of the first aspheric lenses for eyeglasses
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James Crichton-Browne
Sir James Crichton-Browne MD FRS[1] FRSE (29 November 1840 – 31 January 1938) was a leading British psychiatrist, neurologist and medical psychologist. He is known for studies on the relationship of mental illness to brain injury and for the development of public health policies in relation to mental health. Crichton-Browne's father was the asylum reformer Dr William A.F. Browne, a prominent member of the Edinburgh Phrenological Society, and from 1838 until 1857, the superintendent of the Crichton Royal at Dumfries. Crichton-Browne edited the highly influential West Riding Lunatic Asylum Medical Reports (six volumes, 1871–76). He was one of Charles Darwin's major collaborators – on The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872) – and, like Duchenne de Boulogne (at the Salpêtrière in Paris) and Hugh Welch Diamond in Surrey, was a pioneer of neuropsychiatric photography
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Robert William Wood
Robert William Wood
Robert William Wood
(March 4, 1889 – March 14, 1979) was an American landscape painter.[1] He was born in England, emigrated to the United States and rose to prominence in the 1950s with the sales of millions of his color reproductions.[2] He was active in the art colonies of San Antonio, Texas
San Antonio, Texas
in the 1930s,[3] Monterey, California
California
in the 1940s and Laguna Beach in the 1950s.[4]Contents1 Biography1.1 Life and work 1.2 Robert Wood reproductions 1.3 Studio locations 1.4 Later life2 Productivity 3 See also 4 Notes 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit] Life and work[edit] Robert William Wood
Robert William Wood
was born in Sandgate, Kent, England, near the White Cliffs of Dover
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Appleton Medal And Prize
The Appleton medal and prize is awarded for distinguished research in environmental, earth or atmospheric physics. It was originally called the "Chree medal and prize" after Dr
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Arthur Leonard Schawlow
Arthur Leonard Schawlow (May 5, 1921 – April 28, 1999) was an American physicist and co-inventor of the laser with Charles Townes. His central insight, which Townes overlooked, was the use of two mirrors as the resonant cavity to take MASER action to visible wavelengths. He shared the 1981 Nobel Prize in Physics
Physics
with Nicolaas Bloembergen and Kai Siegbahn
Kai Siegbahn
for his work on lasers.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Awards 3 Science and religion 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Schawlow was born in Mount Vernon, New York
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Born Medal And Prize
The Max Born Prize is a scientific prize awarded yearly by the German Physical Society (DPG) and the British Institute of Physics (IOP) in memory of the German physicist Max Born. The terms of the award are that it is "to be presented for outstanding contributions to physics". The award goes to physicists based in Germany and in the UK or Ireland in alternate years.[1][2] The prize is accompanied by a silver medal "about 6 cm in diameter and 0,5 cm thick. One face carries a profile of Max Born and his name and dates. The other face carries the equation pq - qp = h/2πi and the full names of IOP and DPG
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Chadwick Medal And Prize
The Chadwick Medal and Prize
Chadwick Medal and Prize
is a biennial award presented by Institute of Physics
Institute of Physics
(IOP) for distinguished research in particle physics. The medal is accompanied by a prize of £1000 and a certificate. It is named for Nobel Prize–winning physicist James Chadwick.[1] Recipients[edit]2017: Guy Wilkinson[2] 2015: Amanda Cooper Sarkar[3] 2013: Jon Butterworth[4] 2011: Terry Wyatt[5] 2009: Tejinder Virdee[6] 2008: Keith Green and J. Michael Pendlebury[7]References[edit]^ "Chadwick medal recipients". Iop.org. Retrieved 2014-06-13.  ^ "2017 Chadwick Medal and Prize". Iop.org. Retrieved 2017-07-03.  ^ "2015 Chadwick Medal and Prize". Iop.org. Retrieved 2017-03-29.  ^ "2013 Chadwick Medal and Prize". Iop.org. Retrieved 2017-03-29.  ^ "2011 Chadwick Medal and Prize". Iop.org. Retrieved 2017-03-29.  ^ "2009 Chadwick medal and prize". Iop.org
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