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Thomas S. Fiske
Thomas Scott Fiske (1865–January 10, 1944)[1] was an American mathematician.[1] He was born in New York City
New York City
and graduated in 1885 (Ph.D., 1888) from Columbia University,[1] where he was a fellow, assistant, tutor, instructor, and adjunct professor until 1897, when he became professor of mathematics. In 1899 he was acting dean of Barnard College. He was president in 1902–04 of the American Mathematical Society, and he also edited the Bulletin (1891–99) and Transactions (1899–1905) of this society. In 1902 he became secretary of the College Entrance Examination Board. In 1905–06 he also served as president of the Association of Teachers of Mathematics of the Middle States and Maryland. Besides his mathematical papers, he was author of Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable (1906; fourth edition, 1907) Writings[edit]Functions of a complex variable (New York: J. Wiley, 1907)References[edit]^ a b c Fite, W. Benjamin
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin)
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Robert Lee Moore
Robert Lee Moore
Robert Lee Moore
(November 14, 1882 – October 4, 1974) was an American mathematician who taught for many years at the University of Texas. He is known for his work in general topology, for the Moore method of teaching university mathematics, and for his poor treatment of African-American mathematics students.Contents1 Life 2 Topologist 3 Unusual teacher 4 Racism 5 Quotations 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksLife[edit] Although Moore's father was reared in New England
New England
and was of New England ancestry, he fought in the American Civil War
American Civil War
on the side of the Confederacy
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Leonard Eugene Dickson
Leonard Eugene Dickson (January 22, 1874 – January 17, 1954) was an American mathematician. He was one of the first American researchers in abstract algebra, in particular the theory of finite fields and classical groups, and is also remembered for a three-volume history of number theory, History of the Theory of Numbers.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 The algebraist 4 The number theorist 5 Bibliography 6 Notes 7 External linksLife[edit] Dickson considered himself a Texan by virtue of having grown up in Cleburne, where his father was a banker, merchant, and real estate investor. He attended the University of Texas at Austin, where George Bruce Halsted encouraged his study of mathematics. Dickson earned a B.S. in 1893 and an M.S. in 1894, under Halsted's supervision
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Frank Morley
Frank Morley (September 9, 1860 – October 17, 1937) was a leading mathematician, known mostly for his teaching and research in the fields of algebra and geometry. Among his mathematical accomplishments was the discovery and proof of the celebrated Morley's trisector theorem in elementary plane geometry. He led 50 Ph.D.'s to their degrees, and was said to be:"...one of the more striking figures of the relatively small group of men who initiated that development which, within his own lifetime, brought Mathematics
Mathematics
in America from a minor position to its present place in the sun."[1]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Morley was born in the town of Woodbridge in Suffolk, England. His parents were Elizabeth Muskett and Joseph Roberts Morley, Quakers who ran a china shop
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Gilbert Ames Bliss
Gilbert Ames Bliss, (9 May 1876 – 8 May 1951), was an American mathematician, known for his work on the calculus of variations.Contents1 Life 2 Work 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Bliss grew up in a Chicago
Chicago
family that eventually became affluent; in 1907, his father became president of the company supplying all of Chicago's electricity. The family was not affluent, however, when Bliss entered the University of Chicago
Chicago
in 1893 (its second year of operation). Hence he had to support himself while a student by winning a scholarship, and by playing in a student professional mandolin quartet. After obtaining the B.Sc. in 1897, he began graduate studies at Chicago
Chicago
in mathematical astronomy (his first publication was in that field), switching in 1898 to mathematics
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Oswald Veblen
Oswald Veblen
Oswald Veblen
(June 24, 1880 – August 10, 1960) was an American mathematician, geometer and topologist, whose work found application in atomic physics and the theory of relativity. He proved the Jordan curve theorem in 1905;[1] while this was long considered the first rigorous proof, many now also consider Jordan's original proof rigorous.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Accomplishments 4 Personal life 5 Books by O. Veblen 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Veblen was born in Decorah, Iowa. His parents were Andrew Anderson Veblen (1848-1932) and Kirsti (Hougen) Veblen (1851-1908). Veblen's uncle was Thorstein Veblen, noted economist and sociologist. He went to school in Iowa City. He did his undergraduate studies at the University of Iowa, where he received an A.B. in 1898, and Harvard University, where he was awarded a second B.A. in 1900
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George David Birkhoff
George David Birkhoff
George David Birkhoff
(March 21, 1884 – November 12, 1944) was an American mathematician best known for what is now called the ergodic theorem. Birkhoff was one of the most important leaders in American mathematics in his generation, and during his time he was considered by many to be the preeminent American mathematician.[1] The George D. Birkhoff House, his residence in Cambridge, Massachusetts, has been designated a National Historic Landmark.Contents1 Personal life 2 Career2.1 Awards and honors 2.2 Service3 Work 4 Influence on hiring practices 5 Selected publications 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksPersonal life[edit] He was born in Overisel Township, Michigan,[2] the son of David Birkhoff and Jane Gertrude Droppers.[3] The mathematician Garrett Birkhoff (1911–1996) was his son. Career[edit] Birkhoff obtained his A.B. and A.M. from Harvard University
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Virgil Snyder
Virgil Snyder (1869, Dixon, Iowa
Dixon, Iowa
– 1950) was an American mathematician, specializing in algebraic geometry. In 1886 Snyder matriculated at Iowa State College and graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1889. He attended Cornell University
Cornell University
as a graduate student from 1890 to 1892, leaving to study mathematics in Germany on an Erastus W. Brooks fellowship. In 1895 he received a doctorate from the University of Göttingen
University of Göttingen
under Felix Klein. In 1895 Snyder returned to Cornell as an instructor, becoming an assistant professor in 1905 and a full professor in 1910. In 1938 he retired as professor emeritus, having supervised 39 doctoral students, 13 of whom were women.[1] Of these students, perhaps the most well-known is C. L. E. Moore
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Earle Raymond Hedrick
Earle Raymond Hedrick (September 27, 1876 – February 3, 1943), was an American mathematician and a vice-president of the University of California.Contents1 Education and career 2 Research 3 Pedagogical activity 4 Administrative activities 5 Professional societies 6 Textbooks 7 ReferencesEducation and career[edit] Hedrick was born in Union City, Indiana. After undergraduate work at the University of Michigan, he obtained a Master of Arts from Harvard University. With a Parker fellowship, he went to Europe and obtained his PhD from Göttingen University
Göttingen University
in Germany under the supervision of David Hilbert
David Hilbert
in 1901
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Luther P. Eisenhart
Luther Pfahler Eisenhart (13 January 1876 – 28 October 1965) was an American mathematician, best known today for his contributions to semi-Riemannian geometry.Contents1 Life 2 Publications 3 Notes 4 External linksLife[edit] Eisenhart was born in York, Pennsylvania, and graduated from Gettysburg College
Gettysburg College
in 1896. He earned his doctorate in 1900 at Johns Hopkins University, where he was influenced (at long range) by the work of Gaston Darboux
Gaston Darboux
and at shorter range by that of Thomas Craig. During the next two decades, Eisenhart's research focused on moving frames after the French school, but around 1921 took a different turn when he became enamored of the mathematical challenges and entrancing beauty of a new theory of gravitation, Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. Eisenhart played a central role in American mathematics in the early twentieth century
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Arthur Byron Coble
Arthur Byron Coble (November 3, 1878 – December 8, 1966) was an American mathematician. He did research on finite geometries and the group theory related to them, Cremona transformations associated with the Galois theory
Galois theory
of equations, and the relations between hyperelliptic theta functions, irrational binary invariants, the Weddle surface and the Kummer surface. He was President of the American Mathematical Society
American Mathematical Society
from 1933 to 1934.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Academic career 1.3 American Mathematical Society 1.4 Later life2 Research 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksBiography[edit] Early life[edit] Arthur Coble was born on November 3, 1878 in Williamstown, Pennsylvania. His mother Emma was a schoolteacher. When Coble was born, his father Ruben was the manager of a store. Later, he became president of a bank
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Solomon Lefschetz
Solomon Lefschetz
Solomon Lefschetz
(Russian: Соломо́н Ле́фшец; 3 September 1884 – 5 October 1972) was an American mathematician who did fundamental work on algebraic topology, its applications to algebraic geometry, and the theory of non-linear ordinary differential equations.[2][1][3][4]Contents1 Life 2 Selected works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He was born in Moscow
Moscow
into a Jewish family (his parents were Ottoman citizens) who moved shortly after that to Paris. He was educated there in engineering at the École Centrale Paris, but emigrated to the USA in 1905. He was badly injured in an industrial accident in 1907, losing both hands.[5] He moved towards mathematics, receiving a Ph.D
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Griffith C. Evans
Griffith Conrad Evans (11 May 1887 – 8 December 1973) was a mathematician working for much of his career at the University of California, Berkeley. He is largely credited with elevating Berkeley's mathematics department to a top-tier research department,[1] having recruited many notable mathematicians in the 1930s and 1940s.Contents1 Biography 2 Notable positions 3 Selected publications 4 Biographical references 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Evans earned his PhD at Harvard in 1910 under Maxime Bôcher
Maxime Bôcher
with a dissertation on Volterra's Integral Equation, after which he did a post-doc for two years at the University of Rome on a Sheldon Fellowship from Harvard.[2] The experience of working under Vito Volterra shaped his intellectual life and solidified his interest in the application of mathematics to a broad range of fields[3]
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Edward Burr Van Vleck
Edward Burr Van Vleck
Edward Burr Van Vleck
(June 7, 1863, Middletown, Connecticut
Middletown, Connecticut
– June 3, 1943, Madison, Wisconsin)[1] was an American mathematician.Contents1 Early life 2 Japanese art collector 3 Writings 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Van Vleck was born June 7, 1863, Middletown, Connecticut. He was the son of astronomer John Monroe Van Vleck, he graduated from Wesleyan University in 1884, attended Johns Hopkins in 1885-87, and studied at Göttingen (Ph.D., 1893). He also received 1 July 1914 an honorary doctorate of the University of Groningen
University of Groningen
(The Netherlands).[2] He was assistant professor and professor at Wesleyan (1895–1906), and after 1906 a professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where the mathematics building is named after him.[3] His doctoral students include H. S. Wall
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Marston Morse
Harold Calvin Marston Morse
Marston Morse
(March 24, 1892 – June 22, 1977) was an American mathematician best known for his work on the calculus of variations in the large, a subject where he introduced the technique of differential topology now known as Morse theory. The Morse–Palais lemma, one of the key results in Morse theory, is named after him, as is the Thue–Morse sequence, an infinite binary sequence with many applications. In 1933 he was awarded the Bôcher Memorial Prize for his work in mathematical analysis.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected publications2.1 Articles 2.2 Books 2.3 Film3 Notes 4 Biographical references 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] He was born in Waterville, Maine
Waterville, Maine
to Ella Phoebe Marston and Howard Calvin Morse in 1892. He received his bachelor's degree from Colby College (also in Waterville) in 1914
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