HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Thomas Minton
Thomas Minton
Thomas Minton
(1765 – 1836) was an English potter
[...More...]

"Thomas Minton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Stoke-upon-Trent
Stoke-upon-Trent, commonly called Stoke, is a component town of the city of Stoke-on-Trent, in Staffordshire, England. The town was incorporated as a municipal borough in 1874 and is one of six that federated to form the county borough of Stoke-on-Trent
Stoke-on-Trent
in 1910, along with Hanley, Tunstall, Burslem, Longton and Fenton. It is the seat of the city's council, though Stoke-on-Trent's city centre is usually regarded as being the nearby town of Hanley which, since federation, has been the most commercially important of the six towns.Contents1 Name1.1 Renaming proposals2 Growth of Stoke and its transport links 3 King's Hall 4 Stoke Market 5 The Potteries 6 Stoke today 7 References 8 Further readingName[edit] On 1 April 1910, the town was federated into the county borough of Stoke-on-Trent. By 1925 the area was granted city status. Confusion can arise over the similarity of this town's name to that of the larger city
[...More...]

"Stoke-upon-Trent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Josiah Spode
Josiah Spode
Spode
(23 March 1733 – 18 August 1797) was an English potter and the founder of the English Spode
Spode
pottery works which became famous for the quality of its wares. He is often credited with the establishment of blue underglaze transfer printing in Staffordshire in 1781–84, and with the definition and introduction in c
[...More...]

"Josiah Spode" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pottery
Pottery
Pottery
is the ceramic material which makes up pottery wares,[1] of which major types include earthenware, stoneware and porcelain. The place where such wares are made by a potter is also called a pottery (plural "potteries"). The definition of pottery used by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is "all fired ceramic wares that contain clay when formed, except technical, structural, and refractory products."[2] Pottery
Pottery
is one of the oldest human inventions, originating before the Neolithic
Neolithic
period, with ceramic objects like the Gravettian
Gravettian
culture Venus of Dolní Věstonice
Venus of Dolní Věstonice
figurine discovered in the Czech Republic date back to 29,000–25,000 BC,[3] and pottery vessels that were discovered in Jiangxi, China, which date back to 18,000 BC
[...More...]

"Pottery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

James Northcote (painter)
James Northcote
James Northcote
RA ( Plymouth
Plymouth
22 October 1746 – 13 July 1831 London) was an English painter.[1]Contents1 Life and work 2 Writings 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit] Northcote was born in Plymouth, and was apprenticed to his father, Samuel Northcote, a watchmaker. In his spare time, he drew and painted. In 1769 he left his father's work and set up as a portrait painter. Four years later he went to London
London
and was admitted as a pupil into the studio and house of Sir Joshua Reynolds. At the same time he attended the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
schools. In 1775 he left Reynolds' studio, and about two years later, having made some money by portrait painting back in Devon, he went to study in Italy
[...More...]

"James Northcote (painter)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Staffordshire
Staffordshire
Staffordshire
(/ˈstæfərdʃɪər/ or /ˈstæfərdʃər/;[2] abbreviated Staffs) is a landlocked county in the West Midlands of England. It adjoins Cheshire
Cheshire
to the north west, Derbyshire
Derbyshire
and Leicestershire
Leicestershire
to the east, Warwickshire
Warwickshire
to the south east, West Midlands and Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to the south, and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the west. Stone railway station
Stone railway station
in Stone.The largest city in Staffordshire
Staffordshire
is Stoke-on-Trent, which is administered separately from the rest of the county as an independent unitary authority. Lichfield
Lichfield
also has city status, although this is a considerably smaller cathedral city
[...More...]

"Staffordshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Thomas Turner (potter)
Thomas Turner (1749 – February 1809) was an English potter. Biography[edit] Turner was born in 1749, was the eldest son of Richard Turner (1724?–1791), vicar of Elmley Castle, Worcestershire, by his wife Sarah. Richard Turner (1753–1788) was his younger brother. It has been supposed that Thomas was brought up as a silversmith. He was, however, only formally apprenticed to his father, to qualify him for the freedom of the city of Worcester. It is probable that he was early connected with the Worcester china works. He was an excellent chemist, was a thorough master of the various processes connected with porcelain manufacture, was a skillful draughtsman, designer, and engraver, and was also a clever musician
[...More...]

"Thomas Turner (potter)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Transferware
Transferware is a style of ceramics including pottery, dinnerware, and other delicate items. It uses transfer printing, a decorative technique which was developed in England
England
in the mid-18th century, particularly around the Staffordshire
Staffordshire
region. The process starts with an engraved copper plate similar to those used for making paper engravings. The plate is used to print the pattern on tissue paper, then the tissue paper transfers the wet ink to the ceramic surface. The ceramic is then fired in a low temperature kiln to fix the pattern. This can be done over or under the glaze, but the underprinting method is more durable. The process produces fine lines similar to the engraved prints in old books
[...More...]

"Transferware" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chinoiserie
Chinoiserie
Chinoiserie
(English: /ʃinˈwɑːzri/, French: [ʃinwazʁi]; loanword from French chinoiserie, from chinois, "Chinese") is the European interpretation and imitation of Chinese and East Asian artistic traditions, especially in the decorative arts, garden design, architecture, literature, theatre, and music.[1] The aesthetic of Chinoiserie
Chinoiserie
has been expressed in different ways depending on the region. Its acknowledgement derives from the current of Orientalism, which studied Far East cultures from a historical, philological, anthropological, philosophical and religious point of view
[...More...]

"Chinoiserie" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Bone China
Bone china
Bone china
is a type of soft-paste porcelain that is composed of bone ash, feldspathic material, and kaolin. It has been defined as ware with a translucent body containing a minimum of 30% of phosphate derived from animal bone and calculated calcium phosphate.[1] Bone china is the strongest of the porcelain or china ceramics, having very high mechanical strength and chip resistance, and is known for its high levels of whiteness and translucency.[2][3] Its high strength allows it to be produced in thinner cross-sections than other types of porcelain.[2] Like stoneware it is vitrified, but is translucent due to differing mineral properties.[4] The first commercially widespread bone china was developed by the English potter Josiah Spode
Josiah Spode
in the early 1790s
[...More...]

"Bone China" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
[...More...]

"England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Pearlware
Creamware is a cream-coloured, refined earthenware with a lead glaze over a pale body. It was created around 1740 by the potters of Staffordshire, England, and became a popular domestic ware until the 1840s. Creamware is often described as Pratt Ware, or prattware.Josiah Wedgwood: Tea and coffee service, c. 1775. Transfer-printed in purple enamel by Guy Green of Liverpool. Victoria & Albert Museum, LondonContents1 Early development 2 Later development 3 Pearlware 4 Forms 5 Decoration5.1 Lead-powder 5.2 Tortoiseshell method 5.3 Transfer-printing 5.4 Enamelling6 Manufacturers and attribution 7 Creamware and the European market 8 Decline of creamware 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly development[edit] Creamware is the name given to a type of earthenware pottery which is made from white clays from Dorset and Devonshire combined with an amount of calcined flint
[...More...]

"Pearlware" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

William Greatbatch
William Greatbatch (Circa 1735 to circa 29 April 1813[1]) was a noted potter at Fenton, Staffordshire, from the mid-eighteenth to the beginning of the nineteenth centuries. Fenton was one of the six towns of the Staffordshire Potteries, which were joined in the early 20th century to become the city of Stoke-on-Trent in Staffordshire, England. North Staffordshire became a centre of ceramic production in the early 17th century, due to the local availability of clay, salt, lead and coal. The nature and scale of local pottery production changed dramatically during the course of the 18th century as part of the Industrial Revolution. Greatbatch served as an apprentice to Thomas Whieldon at Fenton Vivian before setting up as an independent manufacturer
[...More...]

"William Greatbatch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Tom Minton
Tom Minton is an American animation producer, writer, story editor and storyboard artist.[1] He created and wrote the "Toby Danger" episode of Freakazoid!,[2] wrote the lyrics to the song "Brainstem"[3] and served as head model for the Warner Bros. character the Brain in Pinky and the Brain.[4] He was story editor of Ralph Bakshi's Mighty Mouse: The New Adventures, a 1987 series art-directed by John Kricfalusi.[5] He was the producer of Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring (2001) and The Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-Traordinary Adventure (2002)
[...More...]

"Tom Minton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Spode
Spode
Spode
is a well-known English brand of pottery and homewares produced by the company of the same name which is based in Stoke-on-Trent.Contents1 Overview 2 The foundation2.1 Underglaze blue transfer printing 2.2 The bone china formula3 Spode
Spode
"Stone-China" 4 Later forms of the business 5 Spode
Spode
"Christmas Tree" 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 External linksOverview[edit]Entrance to Spode
Spode
Pottery
Pottery
Works, Stoke Spode
Spode
is a Stoke-on-Trent
Stoke-on-Trent
based pottery company that was founded by Josiah Spode
Josiah Spode
(1733–1797) in 1770
[...More...]

"Spode" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.