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Thomas Mann
Paul Thomas Mann
Thomas Mann
(German: [paʊ̯l toːmas man]; 6 June 1875 – 12 August 1955) was a German novelist, short story writer, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and the 1929 Nobel Prize in Literature laureate. His highly symbolic and ironic epic novels and novellas are noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and the intellectual. His analysis and critique of the European and German soul used modernized German and Biblical stories, as well as the ideas of Goethe, Nietzsche and Schopenhauer. Mann was a member of the Hanseatic Mann family
Mann family
and portrayed his family and class in his first novel, Buddenbrooks. His older brother was the radical writer Heinrich Mann
Heinrich Mann
and three of his six children, Erika Mann, Klaus Mann
Klaus Mann
and Golo Mann, also became important German writers
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Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
Hitler
(German: [ˈadɔlf ˈhɪtlɐ] ( listen); 20 April 1889 – 30 April 1945) was a German politician who was the leader of the Nazi Party
Nazi Party
(Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei; NSDAP), Chancellor of Germany
Chancellor of Germany
from 1933 to 1945 and Führer
Führer
("Leader") of Nazi Germany
Nazi Germany
from 1934 to 1945.[a] As dictator, Hitler
Hitler
initiated World War II
World War II
in Europe with the invasion of Poland in September 1939, and was central to the Holocaust. Hitler
Hitler
was born in Austria—then part of Austria-Hungary—and was raised near Linz. He moved to Germany
Germany
in 1913 and was decorated during his service in the German Army in World War I
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Yukio Mishima
Yukio Mishima (三島 由紀夫, Mishima Yukio) is the pen name of Kimitake Hiraoka (平岡 公威, Hiraoka Kimitake, January 14, 1925 – November 25, 1970), a Japanese author, poet, playwright, actor, model, film director, founder of the Tatenokai, and nationalist. Mishima is considered one of the most important Japanese authors of the 20th century. He was considered for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1968 but the award went to his countryman Yasunari Kawabata.[1] His works include the novels Confessions of a Mask and The Temple of the Golden Pavilion, and the autobiographical essay Sun and Steel. His avant-garde work displayed a blending of modern and traditional aesthetics that broke cultural boundaries, with a focus on sexuality, death, and political change.[2] Mishima was active as a nationalist and founded his own right-wing militia, the Tatenokai
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Free City Of Lübeck
The Free and Hanseatic City of Lübeck
Lübeck
was a city-state from 1226 to 1937, in what is now the German states of Schleswig-Holstein
Schleswig-Holstein
and Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.Contents1 History1.1 Imperial Free City and the Hanseatic League 1.2 Full sovereignty in 1806 1.3 First annexation 1.4 Reestablishment as sovereign state in 1813 1.5 Second and final annexation2 See also 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] Imperial Free City and the Hanseatic League[edit] In 1226 Emperor Frederick II declared the city of Lübeck
Lübeck
to be a Free Imperial City. Lübeck
Lübeck
law was the constitution of the city's municipal form of government developed after being made a free city. In theory, Lübeck
Lübeck
law made the cities which had adopted it independent of royalty
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Novella
A novella is a text of written, fictional, narrative prose normally longer than a short story but shorter than a novel, somewhere between 7,500 and 40,000 words. The English word "novella" derives from the Italian novella,[1] derived from nuovo, which means "new"
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Lutheranism
Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is a major branch of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
(1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian. Luther's efforts to reform the theology and practice of the Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
in the German-speaking territories of the Holy Roman Empire
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Gymnasium (school)
A gymnasium is a type of school with a strong emphasis on academic learning, and providing advanced secondary education in some parts of Europe comparable to British grammar schools, sixth form colleges and US preparatory high schools. In its current meaning, it usually refers to secondary schools focused on preparing students to enter a university for advanced academic study. Before the 20th century, the system of gymnasiums was a wide spread feature of educational system throughout many countries of central, north, eastern, and south Europe. Historically, the German Gymnasium also included in its overall accelerated curriculum post secondary education at college level and the degree awarded substituted for the bachelor's degree (Baccalaureat)[1] previously awarded by a college or university so that universities in Germany became exclusively graduate schools
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Technical University Of Munich
The Technical University of Munich[4] (TUM) (German: Technische Universität München) is a research university with campuses in Munich, Garching
Garching
and Freising-Weihenstephan. It is a member of TU9, an incorporated society of the largest and most notable German institutes of technology
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Joseph Heller
Joseph Heller
Joseph Heller
(May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American author of novels, short stories, plays and screenplays
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Lutheran
Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is a major branch of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
(1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian. Luther's efforts to reform the theology and practice of the Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
in the German-speaking territories of the Holy Roman Empire
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Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein
(14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist[5] who developed the theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics (alongside quantum mechanics).[4][6]:274 His work is also known for its influence on the philosophy of science.[7][8] He is best known by the general public for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed "the world's most famous equation").[9] He received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics
Nobel Prize in Physics
"for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect",[10] a pivotal step in the evolution of quantum theory. Near the beginning of his career, Einstein thought that Newtonian mechanics was no longer enough to reconcile the laws of classical mechanics with the laws of the electromagnetic field
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Klaipėda Region
The Klaipėda
Klaipėda
Region (Lithuanian: Klaipėdos kraštas) or Memel Territory (German: Memelland or Memelgebiet) was defined by the Treaty of Versailles in 1920 and refers to the most northern part of the German province of East Prussia, when as Memelland it was put under the administration of the Council of Ambassadors
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Lithuania
Coordinates: 55°N 24°E / 55°N 24°E / 55; 24 Lithuania
Lithuania
(/ˌlɪθjuˈeɪniə/ ( listen);[11] Lithuanian: Lietuva [lʲɪɛtʊˈvɐ]), officially the Republic
Republic
of Lithuania (Lithuanian: Lietuvos Respublika), is a country in the Baltic region of northern-eastern Europe. One of the three Baltic states, it is situated along the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea, to the east of Sweden
Sweden
and Denmark. It is bordered by Latvia
Latvia
to the north, Belarus to the east and south, Poland
Poland
to the south, and Kaliningrad Oblast
Kaliningrad Oblast
(a Russian exclave) to the southwest. Lithuania
Lithuania
has an estimated population of 2.8 million people as of 2017[update], and its capital and largest city is Vilnius. Lithuanians
Lithuanians
are a Baltic people
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Southern France
Southern France
France
or the South of France, colloquially known as le Midi,[1][2] is a defined geographical area consisting of the regions of France
France
that border the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
south of the Marais Poitevin,[3] Spain, the Mediterranean, and Italy. The Midi includes:[4]Aquitaine The island of Corsica Languedoc-Roussillon Midi-Pyrénées Poitou-Charentes
Poitou-Charentes
(the southern parts)[3] Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur Rhône-Alpes
Rhône-Alpes
(the southern parts)This area corresponds in large part to Occitania, the territory in which Occitan (French: langue d'oc) — as distinct from the langues d'oïl of northern France — was historically the dominant language
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Goethe Prize
The Goethe Prize of the City of Frankfurt (German: Goethepreis der Stadt Frankfurt) is a prestigious award for achievement 'worthy of honour in memory of Johann Wolfgang Goethe' made by the city of Frankfurt am Main, Germany.[1] It was usually an annual award until 1955, and thereafter has been triennial
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