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Thomas Ken
Thomas Ken
Thomas Ken
(July 1637 – 19 March 1711) was an English cleric who was considered the most eminent of the English non-juring bishops, and one of the fathers of modern English hymnody.Contents1 Early life 2 Ken and Charles II 3 Ken and James II 4 The nonjuring schism 5 Lodger at Longleat 6 Ken's reputation and legacy 7 See also 8 Writings 9 References 10 Sources 11 External linksEarly life[edit] Ken was born in 1637 at Little Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire. His father was Thomas Ken
Thomas Ken
of Furnival's Inn, of the Ken family of Ken Place, in Somerset; his mother was the daughter of little known English poet, John Chalkhill. In 1646 Ken's stepsister, Anne, married Izaak Walton, author of The Compleat Angler, a connection which brought Ken under the influence of this gentle and devout man.[1] In 1652 Ken entered Winchester College, and in 1656 became a student of Hart Hall, Oxford
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Berkhamsted
Berkhamsted
Berkhamsted
(/ˈbɜːrkəmstɛd/ BUR-kəm-sted) is a historic market town close to the western boundary of Hertfordshire, England. The affluent commuter town is located in the small Bulbourne valley in the Chiltern Hills, 26 miles (42 km) northwest of London.[2][3] Berkhamsted
Berkhamsted
is a civil parish, with a town council within the larger borough of Dacorum.[4] Berkhamsted
Berkhamsted
and the adjoining village of Northchurch
Northchurch
are separated from other towns and villages by countryside that is within the Metropolitan Green Belt
Metropolitan Green Belt
and much of it classified as being an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty(AONB).[5] The high street is on a pre-Roman route known by its Saxon name Akeman Street
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Anglican
Anglicanism
Anglicanism
is a Western Christian tradition that evolved out of the practices, liturgy and identity of the Church of England
Church of England
following the Protestant Reformation.[1] Adherents of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
are called "Anglicans". The majority of Anglicans are members of national or regional ecclesiastical provinces of the international Anglican Communion,[2] which forms the third-largest Christian communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic
Catholic
Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church.[3] They are in full communion with the See of Canterbury, and thus the Archbishop of Canterbury, whom the communion refers to as its primus inter pares (Latin, "first among equals")
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Isle Of Wight
The Isle of Wight
Isle of Wight
(/waɪt/; also referred to informally as IoW or The Island)[4] is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, about 2 miles (3.2 km) off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House
Osborne House
at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets
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Roman Catholicism
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Prebendary
A prebendary is a senior member of clergy, normally supported by the revenues from an estate or parish. The holder of the post is connected to an Anglican or Roman Catholic cathedral or collegiate church. The position is a type of canon who has a role in the administration of a cathedral. A prebend is the form of benefice held by a prebendary: historically, the stipend attached to it was usually drawn from specific sources in the income of a cathedral's estates. When attending cathedral services, prebendaries sit in particular seats, usually at the back of the choir stalls, known as prebendal stalls. History[edit] At the time of the Domesday Book, the canons and dignitaries of the cathedrals of England were supported by the produce and other profits from the cathedral estates.[1] In the early 12th century, the endowed prebend was developed as an institution, in possession of which a cathedral official had a fixed and independent income
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Curate
A curate (/ˈkjuːrɪt/ KEW-rit) is a person who is invested with the care or cure (cura) of souls of a parish. In this sense, "curate" correctly means a parish priest; but in English-speaking countries the term curate is commonly used to describe clergy who are assistants to the parish priest
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Longleat
Longleat
Longleat
is an English stately home and the seat of the Marquesses of Bath. It is a leading and early example of the Elizabethan
Elizabethan
prodigy house. It is adjacent to the village of Horningsham
Horningsham
and near the towns of Warminster
Warminster
and Westbury in Wiltshire
Wiltshire
and Frome
Frome
in Somerset. It is noted for its Elizabethan
Elizabethan
country house, maze, landscaped parkland and safari park
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Declaration Of Indulgence
The Declaration of Indulgence or Declaration for Liberty of Conscience was a pair of proclamations made by James II of England
James II of England
and VII of Scotland in 1687
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Charles II Of England
Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685)[c] was king of England, Scotland and Ireland. He was king of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and king of England, Scotland and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death. Charles II's father, Charles I, was executed at Whitehall on 30 January 1649, at the climax of the English Civil War. Although the Parliament of Scotland
Parliament of Scotland
proclaimed Charles II king on 5 February 1649, England entered the period known as the English Interregnum or the English Commonwealth, and the country was a de facto republic, led by Oliver Cromwell. Cromwell defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester on 3 September 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France, the Dutch Republic and the Spanish Netherlands
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Little Easton
Little Easton
Little Easton
is a village and civil parish in Essex, England. The village is situated approximately 7 miles (11 km) east from the town of Bishop's Stortford, and 12 miles (19 km) north-west from the county town of Chelmsford. Little Easton
Little Easton
parish is defined at the west by the River Roding, and the east by the River Chelmer
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Mary II Of England
Mary II (30 April 1662 – 28 December 1694) was joint monarch of England, Scotland, and Ireland with her husband and first cousin, William III of Orange, from 1689 until her death. William and Mary, both Protestants, became king and queen regnant following the Glorious Revolution, which resulted in the adoption of the English Bill of Rights and the deposition of her Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
father, James II and VII. William became sole ruler upon her death in 1694. Popular histories usually refer to their joint reign as that of "William and Mary". Mary wielded less power than William when he was in England, ceding most of her authority to him, though he heavily relied on her
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William III Of England
William III (Dutch: Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702),[2] also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange
Prince of Orange
from birth, Stadtholder
Stadtholder
of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland
Gelderland
and Overijssel
Overijssel
in the Dutch Republic
Dutch Republic
from 1672 and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death in 1702. It is a coincidence that his regnal number (III) was the same for both Orange and England. As King of Scotland, he is known as William II.[3] He is sometimes informally known in Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
and Scotland as "King Billy".[4] William inherited the principality of Orange from his father, William II, who died a week before William's birth. His mother, Mary, was the daughter of King Charles I of England
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Hague
The Hague
The Hague
(/ðə ˈheɪɡ/; Dutch: Den Haag, pronounced [dɛn ˈɦaːx] ( listen), short for 's-Gravenhage; [ˈsxraːvə(n)ˌɦaːɣə] ( listen)) is a city on the western coast of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and the capital of the province of South Holland. With a metropolitan population of more than 1 million, it is the third-largest city in the Netherlands, after Amsterdam
Amsterdam
and Rotterdam. The Rotterdam– The Hague
The Hague
metropolitan area, with a population of approximately 2.7 million, is the 12th-largest in the European Union and the most populous in the country
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Nell Gwynne
Eleanor "Nell" Gwyn (2 February 1650 – 14 November 1687; also spelled Gwynn, Gwynne) was a long-time mistress of King Charles II of England
England
and Scotland. Called "pretty, witty Nell" by Samuel Pepys, she has been regarded as a living embodiment of the spirit of Restoration England
England
and has come to be considered a folk heroine, with a story echoing the rags-to-royalty tale of Cinderella. She was the most famous Restoration actress and possessed a prodigious comic talent.[1] Gwyn had two sons by King Charles: Charles Beauclerk (1670–1726); and James Beauclerk (1671–1680). The surname of her sons is pronounced 'Bo-Clare'. Charles was created Earl of Burford
Earl of Burford
and later Duke of St
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Tangier
Tangier
Tangier
(/tænˈdʒɪər/; Arabic: طَنجة‎ Ṭanjah; Berber: ⵟⴰⵏⴵⴰ Ṭanja; old Berber name: ⵜⵉⵏⴳⵉ Tingi; adapted to Latin: Tingis; French: Tanger; Spanish: Tánger; also called Tangiers in English) is a major city in northwestern Morocco. It is located on the Maghreb
Maghreb
coast at the western entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar, where the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
meets the Atlantic Ocean off Cape Spartel. The town is the capital of the Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
region, as well as the Tangier-Assilah prefecture of Morocco. Many civilisations and cultures have impacted the history of Tangier starting from before the 5th century BC
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