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Thomas Frederick Tout
Thomas Frederick Tout, FBA (28 September 1855 – 23 October 1929) was a 19th- and 20th-century British historian of the medieval period.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Professor of History2.1 Undergraduate and postgraduate research 2.2 Papers 2.3 Personal life3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in London, he was a pupil of St Olave's Grammar School, still then at Southwark, a graduate of Balliol College, Oxford, and a fellow of Pembroke, but failing to obtain permanent fellowships at All Souls (1879) and Lincoln, his first academic post was at St David's University College, Lampeter
Lampeter
(now the University of Wales, Lampeter), where his job title was 'Professor of English and Modern Languages'. While at Lampeter, Tout commenced his prolific production of articles for the Dictionary of National Biography,[2] including the entry on Rowland Williams
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Fellow Of The British Academy
Fellowship of the British Academy
British Academy
(FBA) is an award granted by the British Academy
British Academy
to leading academics for their distinction[1] in the humanities and social sciences.[2] There are three kinds of fellowship[3]Fellows, for scholars resident in the United Kingdom Corresponding Fellows, for scholars not resident in the UK Honorary Fellows, an honorary academic titleThe award of fellowship is evidenced by published work and fellows may use the post-nominal letters: FBA. Examples of fellows include Mary Beard, Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
and Rowan Williams. See also[edit]List of Fellows of the British AcademyReferences[edit]^ "The British Academy
British Academy
welcomes new Fellows for 2015 University of Cambridge". Cam.ac.uk. 2015-07-16. Retrieved 2016-12-10.  ^ "Fellows British Academy"
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Wikisource
Wikisource
Wikisource
is an online digital library of free content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource
Wikisource
is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aims are to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg. The name Wikisource
Wikisource
was adopted later that year and it received its own domain name seven months later
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A. W. Ward
Sir Adolphus William Ward, FBA (2 December 1837 in Hampstead, London – 19 June 1924) was an English historian and man of letters.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Ward was born at Hampstead, London, the son of John Ward. He was educated in Germany
Germany
and at Peterhouse, Cambridge.[1] In 1866 Ward was appointed professor of history and English literature in Owens College, Manchester, and was principal from 1890 to 1897, when he retired
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John Rylands Library
The John Rylands
John Rylands
Library is a late-Victorian neo-Gothic building on Deansgate
Deansgate
in Manchester, England. The library, which opened to the public in 1900, was founded by Enriqueta Augustina Rylands
Enriqueta Augustina Rylands
in memory of her husband, John Rylands.[4] The John Rylands
John Rylands
Library and the library of the University of Manchester
Manchester
merged in July 1972 into the John Rylands
John Rylands
University Library of Manchester; today it is part of The University of Manchester
Manchester
Library. Special
Special
collections built up by both libraries were progressively concentrated in the Deansgate
Deansgate
building
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Fallowfield
Fallowfield
Fallowfield
is a suburb of the city of Manchester, England. The population of the ward at the 2011 census was 15,211.[1] Historically in Lancashire, it lies roughly 3 miles (5 km) south of Manchester city centre and is bisected east–west by Wilmslow Road
Wilmslow Road
and north–south by Moseley Road and Wilbraham Road. The former Fallowfield Loop
Fallowfield Loop
railway line, now a cycle path, follows a route nearly parallel with the east–west main road (Moseley Road/Wilbraham Road). The area has a very large student population. The University of Manchester's main accommodation complex – the Fallowfield Campus – occupies a large area in the north; these are adjacent to the university's Owens Park
Owens Park
halls of residence and the Firs Botanical Grounds. In the north-west of the suburb is Platt Fields Park
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Withington
Withington
Withington
is a suburb of south Manchester, England. Historically part of Lancashire, it lies 4 miles (6.4 km) from Manchester
Manchester
city centre, about 0.4 miles (0.6 km) south of Fallowfield, 0.5 miles (0.8 km) north-east of Didsbury
Didsbury
and 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Chorlton-cum-Hardy
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Political Science Quarterly
Political Science Quarterly
Political Science Quarterly
is an American double blind peer-reviewed academic journal covering government, politics, and policy, published since 1886 by the Academy of Political Science. Its editor-in-chief is Demetrios James Caraley (Columbia University).[1] Each issue consists of five or six articles as well as up to 40 book reviews. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2015 impact factor of 0.366, ranking it 129th out of 163 journals in the category "Political Science".[2] History[edit] Political Science Quarterly
Political Science Quarterly
was established in 1886 by John W. Burgess (Columbia University), the Academy's first president, with the active involvement of New York publisher George A. Plimpton. References[edit]^ "SIPA: Faculty Demetrios Caraley". Sipa.columbia.edu. Retrieved 2012-12-12.  ^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Political Science". 2015 Journal Citation Reports
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
Project Gutenberg
(PG) is a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to "encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks".[2] It was founded in 1971 by Michael S. Hart
Michael S. Hart
and is the oldest digital library.[3] Most of the items in its collection are the full texts of public domain books. The project tries to make these as free as possible, in long-lasting, open formats that can be used on almost any computer. As of 23 March 2018[update], Project Gutenberg reached 56,750 items in its collection of free eBooks.[4] The releases are available in plain text but, wherever possible, other formats are included, such as HTML, PDF, EPUB, MOBI, and Plucker. Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content, including regional and language-specific works
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Oxbridge
Oxbridge
Oxbridge
is a portmanteau of "Oxford" and "Cambridge"; the two oldest, most prestigious, and consistently most highly-ranked universities in the United Kingdom. The term is used to refer to them collectively, both in contrast to other British universities and more broadly to describe characteristics reminiscent of University of Oxford
University of Oxford
and University of Cambridge, often with implications of superior social or intellectual status.[1]Contents1 Origins 2 Meaning 3 Related terms 4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksOrigins[edit] Although both universities were founded more than eight centuries ago, the term Oxbridge
Oxbridge
is relatively recent. In William Thackeray's novel Pendennis, published in 1850, the main character attends the fictional Boniface College, Oxbridge. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, this is the first recorded instance of the word
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LibriVox
LibriVox
LibriVox
is a group of worldwide volunteers who read and record public domain texts creating free public domain audiobooks for download from their website and other digital library hosting sites on the internet. It was founded in 2005 by Hugh McGuire to provide "Acoustical liberation of books in the public domain"[1] and the LibriVox objective is "To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet".[2] By the end of 2017, LibriVox
LibriVox
had a catalog of over 12,000 works and from 2009–2017 was producing about 1,000 per year.[3] Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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