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Thomas Edison
Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor. He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park", he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory. Edison was a prolific inventor, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany
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Mount Clemens, Michigan
Mount Clemens is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 16,314 at the 2010 census
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Vienna, Ontario
Bayham (2011 Population: 6,989) is a municipality in the southeast corner of Elgin County, Ontario, Canada
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Voting Machine
A voting machine is a machine used to register and tabulate votes. The first voting machines were mechanical but it is increasingly more common to use electronic voting machines. Traditionally, a voting machine has been defined by the mechanism the system uses to cast votes and further categorized by the location where the system tabulates the votes. Voting machines have different levels of usability, security, efficiency and accuracy. Certain systems may be more or less accessible to all voters, or not accessible to those voters with certain types of disabilities
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Electric Car
An electric car is an automobile that is propelled by one or more electric motors, using energy stored in rechargeable batteries
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Motion Picture
A film, also called a movie, motion picture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images. (See the glossary of motion picture terms.) This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed in rapid succession. The process of filmmaking is both an Art
Art
film">art and an Film
Film
industry">industry. A film is created by photographing actual scenes with a motion-picture camera; by photographing drawings or miniature models using traditional animation techniques; by means of CGI and computer animation; or by a combination of some or all of these techniques, and other visual effects. The word "cinema", short for cinematography, is often used to refer to filmmaking and the film industry, and to the art of filmmaking itself
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Loyalist (American Revolution)
Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men. They were opposed by the Patriots, those who supported the revolution and called them "persons inimical to the liberties of America". Prominent Loyalists repeatedly assured the British government that many thousands of loyalists would spring to arms and fight for the crown. The British government acted in expectation of that, especially in the southern campaigns in 1780-81. In practice, the number of loyalists in military service was far lower than expected. Across the colonies, Patriots watched suspected Loyalists very closely, and would not tolerate any organized Loyalist opposition. Many outspoken or militarily active loyalists were forced to flee, especially to their stronghold of New York City
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Southwestern Ontario
Southwestern Ontario is a secondary region of Southern Ontario in the Canadian province of Ontario. It occupies most of a peninsula bounded by Lake Huron, including Georgian Bay, to the north and northwest; the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit River, to the west; and Lake Erie to the south. To the east, on land, Southwestern Ontario is bounded by Central Ontario and the Golden Horseshoe. The region had a population of 2,583,544 in 2016. The largest cities in Southwestern Ontario, in order of population (2016), are: London, Kitchener, Windsor, Guelph, Cambridge, Waterloo, Brantford, Sarnia, Stratford, Woodstock, and St. Thomas. Chatham is also a major population centre, but is not an independent municipality and is part of Chatham-Kent
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Rebellions Of 1837
The Rebellions of 1837–1838 (French: Les rébellions de 1837) were two armed uprisings that took place in Lower and Upper Canada in 1837 and 1838. Both rebellions were motivated by frustrations with political reform. A key shared goal was responsible government, which was eventually achieved in the incidents' aftermath
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Motion Pictures
Film, also called movie or motion picture, is a visual art used to simulate experiences that communicate ideas, stories, perceptions, feelings, beauty or atmosphere by the means of recorded or programmed moving images along with other sensory stimulations. The word "cinema", short for cinematography, is often used to refer to filmmaking and the film industry, and to the art form that is the result of it. The moving images of a film are created by photographing actual scenes with a motion-picture camera, by photographing drawings or miniature models using traditional animation techniques, by means of CGI and computer animation, or by a combination of some or all of these techniques, and other visual effects. Traditionally, films were recorded onto celluloid film through a photochemical process and then shown through a movie projector onto a large screen
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War Of 1812
2,200–3,721 killed in action
  • 4,000 slaves freed
  • 20,000 captured
  • 8 frigates captured or burned
  • 278 privateers captured
  • 1,400 merchant ships captured
  • --->
    British Empire:
    1,160 –1,960 killed in action
  • 4 frigates captured
  • ~1,344 merchant ships captured (373 recaptured)
  • 15,500 captured
  • ---> Indian allies:
    10,000 dead from all causes (warriors and civilians)

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    Sarnia
    Sarnia is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, and had a Canada
    Canada
    2016 Census">2016 population of 71,594. It is the largest city on Lake Huron and in Lambton County. Sarnia
    Sarnia
    is located on the eastern bank of the junction between the Upper and Lower Great Lakes where Lake Huron flows into the St. Clair River, which forms the United States
    United States
    border">Canada– United States
    United States
    border, directly across from Port Huron, Michigan. The city's natural harbour first attracted the French explorer La Salle, who named the site "The Rapids" when he had horses and men pull his 45 tonnes (50 short tons; 44 long tons) barque "Le Griffon" up the almost four-knot current of the St. Clair River
    St

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    Scarlet Fever
    Scarlet fever is a disease which can occur as a result of a group A streptococcus (group A strep) infection. The signs and symptoms include a sore throat, fever, headaches, swollen lymph nodes, and a characteristic rash. The rash is red and feels like sandpaper and the tongue may be red and bumpy. It most commo
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    Smiths Creek, Michigan
    Michigan (/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ (About this sound listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the (Ojibwe word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake". Michigan is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi River. Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten. The Upper Peninsula (often referred to as "the U.P.") is separated from the Lower Peninsula by the Straits of Mackinac, a five-mile (8 km) channel that joins Lake Huron to Lake Michigan. The Mackinac Bridge connects the peninsulas
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