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Thomas Edison
Thomas Alva Edison (February 11, 1847 – October 18, 1931) was an American inventor and businessman, who has been described as America's greatest inventor.[1][2][3] He developed many devices that greatly influenced life around the world, including the phonograph, the motion picture camera, and the long-lasting, practical electric light bulb. Dubbed "The Wizard of Menlo Park",[4] he was one of the first inventors to apply the principles of mass production and large-scale teamwork to the process of invention, and is often credited with the creation of the first industrial research laboratory.[5] Edison was a prolific inventor, holding 1,093 US patents in his name, as well as many patents in the United Kingdom, France, and Germany. More significant than the number of Edison's patents was the widespread impact of his inventions: electric light and power utilities, sound recording, and motion pictures all established major new industries worldwide
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Mount Clemens, Michigan
Mount Clemens is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Michigan. The population was 16,314 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Macomb County.[7]Contents1 History 2 Art and culture 3 Culture 4 Geography 5 Demographics5.1 2010 census 5.2 2000 census6 Government 7 Transportation 8 Education 9 Notable people 10 Photo gallery 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] Mount Clemens was first surveyed in 1795 by Christian Clemens, who settled there four years later. Clemens and his friend, John Brooks, built a distillery, which helped settle the area. Brooks and Clemens platted the land, and the town was named after Clemens in 1818. It received a post office in 1821, with John Stockton as the first postmaster. It filed for incorporation as a village in 1837, but it was not acted upon until 1851. It was later incorporated as a city in 1879. Christian Clemens is buried at Clemens Park, located just north of downtown
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Vienna, Ontario
Bayham
Bayham
(2011 Population: 6,989) is a municipality in the southeast corner of Elgin County, Ontario, Canada. It is south of the town of Tillsonburg
Tillsonburg
and Oxford County.Contents1 History 2 Communities 3 Demographics 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Bayham
Bayham
was named in 1810 for Viscount Bayham
Bayham
Charles Pratt, a friend of land grant recipient Colonel Talbot. The township was incorporated on January 1, 1850
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Voting Machine
A voting machine is a machine used to register and tabulate votes. The first voting machines were mechanical but it is increasingly more common to use electronic voting machines. Traditionally, a voting machine has been defined by the mechanism the system uses to cast votes and further categorized by the location where the system tabulates the votes. Voting machines have different levels of usability, security, efficiency and accuracy. Certain systems may be more or less accessible to all voters, or not accessible to those voters with certain types of disabilities
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Electric Car
A battery electric car is a plug-in electric automobile that is propelled by one or more electric motors, using energy stored in rechargeable batteries. Since 2008, a renaissance in electric vehicle manufacturing occurred due to advances in batteries, concerns about increasing oil prices, and the desire to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.[1][2] Several national and local governments have established tax credits, subsidies, and other incentives to promote the introduction and now adoption in the mass market of new electric vehicles depending on battery size and their all-electric range. The current maximum tax credit allowed by the US Government is $7,500 per car.[3] Compared with cars with internal combustion (IC) engines, electric cars are quieter and have no tailpipe emissions. When recharged by low-emission electrical power sources, electric vehicles can reduce greenhouse gas emissions compared to IC engines. Where oil is imported, use of electric vehicles can reduce imports
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Motion Picture
A film, also called a movie, motion picture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images. (See the glossary of motion picture terms.) This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed in rapid succession. The process of filmmaking is both an art and an industry
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Telegraph Operator
A telegraphist (British English), telegrapher (American English), or telegraph operator is an operator who uses a telegraph key to send and receive the Morse code
Morse code
in order to communicate by land lines or radio. Telegraphist
Telegraphist
was one of the very first "high-technology" professions of the modern era. Many young men and young women left their farms and fishing communities in the late 19th century to take high-paying jobs as professional telegraph operators. In those early days telegraphers were in such demand that operators could move from place to place and job to job to achieve ever-higher salaries, thereby freeing them from subsistence lives on family farms. During the Great War
Great War
the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
enlisted many volunteers as radio telegraphists
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Loyalist (American Revolution)
Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men. They were opposed by the Patriots, those who supported the revolution and called them "persons inimical to the liberties of America".[1] Prominent Loyalists repeatedly assured the British government that many thousands of loyalists would spring to arms and fight for the crown. The British government acted in expectation of that, especially in the southern campaigns in 1780-81. In practice, the number of loyalists in military service was far lower than expected. Across the colonies, Patriots watched suspected Loyalists very closely, and would not tolerate any organized Loyalist opposition. Many outspoken or militarily active loyalists were forced to flee, especially to their stronghold of New York City
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Southwestern Ontario
Southwestern Ontario
Ontario
is a secondary region of Southern Ontario
Ontario
in the Canadian province of Ontario. It occupies most of a peninsula bounded by Lake Huron, including Georgian Bay, to the north and northwest; the St. Clair River, Lake St. Clair, and Detroit
Detroit
River, to the west; and Lake Erie
Lake Erie
to the south. To the east, on land, Southwestern Ontario
Ontario
is bounded by Central Ontario
Ontario
and the Golden Horseshoe. The region had a population of 2,583,544 in 2016. The largest cities in Southwestern Ontario, in order of population (2016), are: London, Kitchener, Windsor, Guelph, Cambridge, Waterloo, Brantford, Sarnia, Stratford, Woodstock, and St. Thomas. Chatham is also a major population centre, but is not an independent municipality and is part of Chatham-Kent
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Upper Canada
 Canada ∟ OntarioPart of a series on theHistory of OntarioTimelineFirst NationsPays d'en Haut 1500s–1763 Province of Quebec 1763–1791Upper Canada 1791–1841 Canada
Canada
West 1841–1867Ontario 1867–presentUpper Canada
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Rebellions Of 1837
Government victoryPatriote rebellion crushed by loyalist forces; Republic of Canada dismantled Defeat of Hunters' Lodges Unification of Upper and Lower Canada
Canada
into the Province of CanadaBelligerents Lower Canada Château Clique Patriotes Republic of Lower Canada Upper Canada Family Compact Hunters' Lodges Republic of CanadaCommanders and leadersJohn Colborne, 1st Baron Seaton Francis Bond Head James FitzGibbon George Gurnett Henry Dundas Allan MacNab Charles Stephen Gore George Augustus Wetherall Louis Joseph Papineau William Lyon Mackenzie Thomas Storrow Brown
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Motion Pictures
A film, also called a movie, motion picture, theatrical film, or photoplay, is a series of still images that, when shown on a screen, create the illusion of moving images. (See the glossary of motion picture terms.) This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed in rapid succession. The process of filmmaking is both an art and an industry
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War Of 1812
Treaty of GhentMilitary stalemate; both sides' invasion attempts repulsed Status quo ante bellum Defeat of Tecumseh's ConfederacyBelligerents United StatesChoctaw Cherokee Creeks British Empire United Kingdom  The Canadas Tecumseh's Confederacy[1] Shawnee Creek Red Sticks Ojibwe Fox Iroquois Miami Mingo Ottawa Kickapoo Delaware (Lenape) Mascouten Potawatomi Sauk Wyandot Bourbon Spain Florida (1814)Commanders and leaders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson William Henry Harrison William H. Winder (POW) William Hull  (POW) Zebulon Pike † Oliver Hazard Perry Isaac Chauncey George, Prince Regent Lord Liverpool Sir George Prévost Sir Isaac Brock † Gordon Drummond Charles de Salaberry Roger Hale Sheaffe Robert Ross † Edward Pakenham † James FitzGibbon Alexander Cochrane James Lucas Yeo Tecumseh †StrengthU.S
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Sarnia
Sarnia
Sarnia
is a city in Southwestern Ontario, Canada, and had a 2016 population of 71,594.[1] It is the largest city on Lake Huron
Lake Huron
and in Lambton County. Sarnia
Sarnia
is located on the eastern bank of the junction between the Upper and Lower Great Lakes
Great Lakes
where Lake Huron
Lake Huron
flows into the St. Clair River, which forms the Canada– United States
United States
border, directly across from Port Huron, Michigan. The city's natural harbour first attracted the French explorer La Salle, who named the site "The Rapids" when he had horses and men pull his 45 tonnes (50 short tons; 44 long tons) barque "Le Griffon" up the almost four-knot current[4] of the St. Clair River
St

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Scarlet Fever
Scarlet fever
Scarlet fever
is a disease which can occur as a result of a group A streptococcus (group A strep) infection.[1] The signs and symptoms include a sore throat, fever, headaches, swollen lymph nodes, and a characteristic rash.[1] The rash is red and feels like sandpaper and the tongue may be red and bumpy.[1] It most commonly affects children between five and 15 years of age.[1] Scarlet fever
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Smiths Creek, Michigan
Michigan (/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the (Ojibwe word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake".[3][7] Michigan is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi River.[b] Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten. The Upper Peninsula (often referred to as "the U.P.") is separated from the Lower Peninsula by the Straits of Mackinac, a five-mile (8 km) channel that joins Lake Huron to Lake Michigan. The Mackinac Bridge connects the peninsulas
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