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Thomas Bruce, 3rd Earl Of Elgin
Thomas Bruce, 2nd Earl of Ailesbury
Earl of Ailesbury
and 3rd Earl of Elgin
Earl of Elgin
(1656 – 16 December 1741) was the son of Robert Bruce, 2nd Earl of Elgin
Robert Bruce, 2nd Earl of Elgin
and Lady Diana Grey. His maternal grandparents were Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford, and Lady Anne Cecil, daughter of William Cecil, 2nd Earl of Exeter. His Memoirs, which were not published until long after his death, are a valuable source for English history in the last quarter of the seventeenth century.Contents1 Early life 2 Family 3 Later life 4 Character 5 Memoirs 6 Ancestry 7 NotesEarly life[edit] Lord Bruce, as he was styled from 1663 to 1685, was M.P. for Marlborough between 1679 and 1681 and M.P. for Wiltshire in 1685. He became a Gentleman of the Bedchamber in 1676
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Charles Montagu, 1st Duke Of Manchester
Charles Edward Montagu, 1st Duke of Manchester
Duke of Manchester
PC (c. 1662 – 20 January 1722), previously 4th Earl of Manchester, son of Robert Montagu, 3rd Earl of Manchester,[1] was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge,[2] and succeeded to his father's earldom in 1683. Warmly sympathizing with the Whig revolution of 1688, he attended William and Mary at their coronation, and fought under William at the Boyne.[3] In 1697, he was sent as an envoy to Venice to try to procure the release of British sailors, but the Venetians proved unwilling to negotiate. On his return in 1698, he was appointed a privy councillor. The following year he was sent as English ambassador to France, remaining there until the outrbeak of war in 1701. He was then briefly appointed Secretary of State for the Southern Department, a post he held between January and May 1702
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John Harington, 1st Baron Harington Of Exton
John Harington, 1st Baron Harington (1539/40 – 23 August 1613) of Exton in Rutland, was an English courtier and politician.Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Marriage and progeny 4 ReferencesFamily[edit] He was the eldest son and heir of Sir James Harington (c. 1511–1592) of Exton, by his wife Lucy Sidney (c.1520–c.1591), daughter of Sir William Sidney by his wife Anne Pagenham
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Bail
Bail is money or some form of property that is deposited or pledged[clarify] to a court by a suspect, in return for the release from custody or pre-trial detention. If the suspect does not return to court, the bail is forfeited, and the suspect may possibly be brought up on charges of the crime of failure to appear. If the suspect returns to make all their required appearances, bail is returned after the trial is concluded. In some cases, bail money may be returned at the end of the trial, if all court appearances are made, regardless of whether the person is found guilty or not guilty of the crime accused. Bail laws vary from country to country; in the United States, bail practices vary by state. In some countries, granting bail is common. Even in such countries, however, bail may not be offered by some courts under some circumstances. For minor crimes, a defendant may be summoned to court without the need for bail
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Brussels
Brussels
Brussels
(French: Bruxelles, [bʁysɛl] ( listen); Dutch: Brussel, [ˈbrɵsəl] ( listen)), officially the Brussels-Capital Region[6][7] (French: Région de Bruxelles-Capitale, Dutch: Brussels
Brussels
Hoofdstedelijk Gewest),[8] is a region of Belgium comprising 19 municipalities, including the City of Brussels, which is the de jure capital of Belgium.[9] The Brussels-Capital Region
Brussels-Capital Region
is located in the central portion of the country and is a part of both the French Community of Belgium[10] and the Flemish Community,[11] but is separate from the region of Flanders
Flanders
(in which it forms an enclave) or Wallonia.[12][13] Compared to most regions in Europe, Brussels
Brussels
has a relatively small territory, with an area of 161 km2 (62 sq mi)
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Louis XIV
Louis XIV (5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the God-Given (Louis Dieudonné), Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who reigned as King of France
King of France
from 1643 until his death in 1715. Starting at the age of 4, his reign of 72 years and 110 days is the longest recorded of any monarch of a sovereign country in European history.[1][2] In the age of absolutism in Europe, Louis XIV's France was a leader in the growing centralization of power.[3] Louis began his personal rule of France
France
in 1661, after the death of his chief minister, the Italian Cardinal Mazarin.[4] An adherent of the concept of the divine right of kings, which advocates the divine origin of monarchical rule, Louis continued his predecessors' work of creating a centralized state governed from the capital
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Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl Of Sunderland
Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland, KG, PC (5 September 1641 – 28 September 1702) was an English nobleman and politician of the Spencer family. An able and gifted statesman, his caustic temper and belief in absolute monarchy nevertheless made him numerous enemies. He was forced to flee England in 1688, but later established himself with the new regime after the Revolution of that year. Subsequently, he took on a more disinterested role as an adviser to the Crown, seeking neither office nor favour
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Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke Of Leeds
Thomas Osborne, 1st Duke
Duke
of Leeds, KG (20 February 1632 – 26 July 1712), English politician who was part of the Immortal Seven group that invited William III, Prince of Orange to depose James II of England
England
as monarch during the Glorious Revolution. He was commonly known as Lord Danby and Marquess
Marquess
of Carmarthen when he was a prominent political figure,[1] served in a variety of offices under Kings Charles II and William III of England
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John Maitland, 1st Duke Of Lauderdale
John Maitland, 1st Duke
Duke
and 2nd Earl
Earl
of Lauderdale, 3rd Lord Thirlestane KG PC (24 May 1616, Lethington, East Lothian
East Lothian
– 24 August 1682), was a Scottish politician, and leader within the Cabal Ministry.Contents1 Background 2 Covenanter 3 Privy Councillor in two kingdoms 4 Second English Civil War
English Civil War
and the Worcester Campaign 5 Interregnum 6 Restoration 7 King's councillor 8 The Cabal Ministry 9 Resignation 10 Personal life 11 See also 12 Notes 13 ReferencesBackground[edit] Maitland was a member of an ancient family of both Berwickshire
Berwickshire
and East Lothian, the eldest surviving son of John Maitland, 2nd Lord Maitland of Thirlestane (d
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George Savile, 1st Marquess Of Halifax
George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax, PC, DL, FRS (11 November 1633 – 5 April 1695) was an English statesman, writer, and politician who sat in the House of Commons in 1660, and in the House of Lords
House of Lords
after he was raised to the peerage in 1668.Contents1 Background and early life, 1633–1667 2 Political career, 1668–16802.1 Test Act
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Edward Bruce, 1st Lord Kinloss
Edward Bruce, 1st Lord Kinloss PC (1548 – 14 January 1611), was a Scottish lawyer and judge. He was the second son of Edward Bruce of Blairhall and Alison Reid. Edward served as a Lord of Session from 1597 to 1603 and was created Lord Kinloss in 1602, with remainder to his heirs and assigns whatsoever. He played an important role in King James VI's succession to the throne of England, and accompanied the King to England on his accession in 1603. The same year, Edward became an English subject, was admitted to the Privy Council,and appointed Master of the Rolls for life. He also received Whorlton Castle and its manor in 1603, which would remained in the Bruce family until the late 19th century. In 1604, he was made Lord Bruce of Kinloss, with remainder to his heirs male. Lord Bruce married Magdalene Clerk, daughter of Alexander Clerk
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Thomas Bruce, 1st Earl Of Elgin
Thomas Bruce, 1st Earl of Elgin, 3rd Lord Bruce of Kinloss (1599–1663), of Houghton House in the parish of Maulden in Bedfordshire, was a Scottish nobleman.Contents1 Early life 2 New titles 3 Civil War 4 Marriages & progeny 5 Death 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Born in Edinburgh in 1599, Thomas Bruce was the second son of Edward Bruce, 1st Lord Kinloss by his wife Magdalene Clerk. He succeeded to the Scottish peerage title as 3rd Lord Bruce of Kinloss in August 1613, aged 13, on the death of his elder brother, Edward Bruce, 2nd Lord Kinloss, killed in a duel with Edward Sackville, 4th Earl of Dorset. The family estates included Whorlton Castle and manor given to his father by King James I of England in 1603. The King granted the wardship of Thomas and the estates to his mother Magdalene, until he came of age at 21.[1] In 1624, King James I granted Houghton House to Thomas Bruce, near Ampthill, Bedfordshire
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Henry Grey, 1st Baron Grey Of Groby
Henry Grey, 1st Lord Grey of Groby
Groby
(1547 – 26 July 1614) was an English courtier, administrator and local politician.[1][2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Private life 4 SourcesEarly life[edit] He was the only surviving son of Lord John Grey, son of Thomas Grey, 2nd Marquess of Dorset, and Mary Browne, daughter of Sir Anthony Browne and his first wife, Alice Gage.[3][4] It is believed he was educated at Christ Church, Oxford, where a Henry Grey graduated first with a Bachelor of Arts on 1 February 1565, followed by a Master of Arts on 18 June 1568. He was knighted on 11 November 1587.[1][5] Career[edit] Grey's main ambition was to re-establish his family's position in Leicestershire lost by his father's attainder. Henry succeeded to his father's estate at Pirgo
Pirgo
near Havering Essex when aged 17
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Edward Nevill, 8th Baron Bergavenny
Edward Nevill, de facto 8th (de jure 1st) Baron Bergavenny
Baron Bergavenny
(c. 1550 – 1 December 1622) was an English Peer. The son of Edward Nevill, 7th Baron
Baron
Bergavenny, he succeeded to the Barony upon the death of his father. His right to the title was contested by his cousin Mary, Lady Fane, who claimed to be heir general of her father, the 6th Baron. The dispute went on for many years. He married Rachel Lennard, daughter of John Lennard of Knoll and Elizabeth Harman, together they had the following children:Henry Nevill, 9th Baron Bergavenny
Baron Bergavenny
(b. bef. 1580 – 24 December 1641) Mary Nevill (b. bef. 1598–1648) Sir Christopher Nevill (b. bef. 1611–1649) married Mary D'Arcy and had Richard Nevill (d. abt 1643), who married Sophia Carew. Their son, George Nevill (d
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Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl Of Exeter
Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter, KG (5 May 1542 – 8 February 1623), known as Lord Burghley from 1598 to 1605, was an English politician and soldier.Contents1 Family 2 Career 3 Marriages and issue 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesFamily[edit]Dorothy Neville, first wife of Thomas Cecil (1549–1608)Thomas Cecil was the elder son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, by his first wife, Mary Cheke (d. February 1543), daughter of Sir Peter Cheke of Pirgo, London. He was the half-brother of Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury, Anne Cecil, and Elizabeth Cecil. It has been said that William Cecil considered Thomas to be, "hardly fit to govern a tennis court". This quotation is both unproven and unfair
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