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Thomas Bowrey
Thomas Bowrey (d. 1713) was a British merchant sailor. In the 1670s and 1680s, he sailed around the East Indies.[1] The historian Richard Davenport-Hines lists Bowrey as the first Westerner to provide a written description of the experience of consuming cannabis in the form of bhang.[2] Bowrey also compiled the first Malay-to-English dictionary, and wrote a book of his experiences, A Geographical Account of Countries Round the Bay of Bengal. In 1688, he travelled back to England. On 17 September 1691, he was married to Mary, his cousin, and settled in Wapping. He continued in his support for ventures to the East Indies and owned [or was owed?] shares of many ships.Contents1 See also 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksSee also[edit]Richard Carnac TempleReferences[edit]^ "Bowrey, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press
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East Indies
The East Indies or the Indies are the lands of South and Southeast Asia.[1] In a more restricted sense, the Indies can be used to refer to the islands of Southeast Asia, especially the Malay Archipelago.[1][2] The name "Indies" is derived from the River Indus and is used to connote parts of Asia that came under Indian cultural influence. Dutch-held colonies in the area were known for about 300 years as the Dutch East Indies before Indonesian independence, while Spanish-held colonies were known as the Spanish East Indies before the American conquest and later Philippine independence. The East Indies may also include the former French-held Indochina, former British territories Brunei and Singapore and former Portuguese East Timor
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Richard Davenport-Hines
Richard Davenport-Hines (born 21 June 1953 in London) is a British historian and literary biographer, best known for his biography of the poet W. H. Auden. Life[edit] Davenport-Hines was educated at St Paul's School, London, and Selwyn College, Cambridge (which he entered as Corfield Exhibitioner in 1972 and left in 1977 after completing a PhD thesis on the history of British armaments companies during 1918–36). He was a Research Fellow at the London School of Economics, 1982–86, where he headed a research project on the globalisation of pharmaceutical companies. He was joint winner of the Wolfson Prize for History and Biography in 1985 and winner of the Wadsworth Prize for Business History in 1986. He now writes and reviews in a number of literary journals, including the Literary Review
Literary Review
and The Times Literary Supplement
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Cannabis (drug)
Cannabis, also known as marijuana among other names,[n 1] is a psychoactive drug from the Cannabis
Cannabis
plant intended for medical or recreational use.[16][17][18] The main psychoactive part of cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol (THC); one of 483 known compounds in the plant,[19] including at least 65 other cannabinoids.[20] Cannabis
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Wapping
Wapping
Wapping
(/ˈwɒpɪŋ/ WOP-ing) is a district in London Docklands, England, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. It is situated between the north bank of the River Thames
River Thames
and the ancient thoroughfare simply called The Highway. Wapping's proximity to the river has given it a strong maritime character, which it retains through its riverside public houses and steps, such as the Prospect of Whitby and Wapping
Wapping
Stairs. Many of the original buildings were demolished during the construction of the London Docks
London Docks
and Wapping
Wapping
was further seriously damaged during the Blitz
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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JSTOR
JSTOR
JSTOR
(/ˈdʒeɪstɔːr/ JAY-stor;[3] short for Journal Storage) is a digital library founded in 1995. Originally containing digitized back issues of academic journals, it now also includes books and primary sources, and current issues of journals.[4] It provides full-text searches of almost 2,000 journals.[5] As of 2013, more than 8,000 institutions in more than 160 countries had access to JSTOR;[5] most access is by subscription, but some older public domain content is freely available to anyone.[6] JSTOR's revenue was $69 million in 2014.[7]Contents1 History 2 Content 3 Access3.1 Aaron Swartz
Aaron Swartz
incident 3.2 Limitations 3.3 Increasing public access4 Use 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] William G
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Internet Archive
Coordinates: 37°46′56″N 122°28′18″W / 37.7823°N 122.4716°W / 37.7823; -122.4716Internet ArchiveType of business 501(c)(3) nonprofitType of siteDigital libraryAvailable in EnglishFounded May 12, 1996; 21 years ago (1996-05-12)[1][2]Headquarters Richmond District San Francisco, California, U.S.Chairman Brewster KahleServices Archive-It, Open Library, Wayback Machine
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Bhang
Bhang
Bhang
(Hindi: भांग) is an edible preparation of cannabis. It was used in food and drink as early as 1000 B.C. in the Indian subcontinent.[1] Bhang
Bhang
is traditionally distributed during the spring festival of Holi.[2][3]Contents1 History 2 Preparation 3 Culture 4 Legality 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] In 1596, Dutchman Jan Huyghen van Linschoten
Jan Huyghen van Linschoten
wrote three pages on "Bangue" in a work documenting his journeys in the East, also mentioning the Egyptian Hashish, Turkish Boza, Turkish Bernavi, and Arabic Bursj forms of consumption.[4] The historian Richard Davenport-Hines lists Thomas Bowrey as the first Westerner to document the use of bhang.[5] Preparation[edit] Using mortar and pestle, the buds and leaves of cannabis are ground into a paste which can be added to foods
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Thomas Bowrey
Thomas Bowrey (d. 1713) was a British merchant sailor. In the 1670s and 1680s, he sailed around the East Indies.[1] The historian Richard Davenport-Hines lists Bowrey as the first Westerner to provide a written description of the experience of consuming cannabis in the form of bhang.[2] Bowrey also compiled the first Malay-to-English dictionary, and wrote a book of his experiences, A Geographical Account of Countries Round the Bay of Bengal. In 1688, he travelled back to England. On 17 September 1691, he was married to Mary, his cousin, and settled in Wapping. He continued in his support for ventures to the East Indies and owned [or was owed?] shares of many ships.Contents1 See also 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksSee also[edit]Richard Carnac TempleReferences[edit]^ "Bowrey, Thomas". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press
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Richard Carnac Temple
Sir Richard Carnac Temple, 2nd Baronet
Baronet
CB, CIE (15 October 1850  – 3 March 1931) was the British Chief Commissioner of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands
Andaman and Nicobar Islands
and an anthropological writer.Contents1 Early years 2 Military and administrative career 3 Later career 4 Anthropology 5 Writings 6 Family 7 Selected publications 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly years[edit] Richard Carnac Temple
Richard Carnac Temple
was born in Allahabad, India, on 15 October 1850. He was the eldest son of Sir Richard Temple (1826-1902), a baronet, and his first wife, Charlotte Frances (neé Martindale, d. 1855)
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