HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Thomas Aquinas
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalv t ePart of a series onChristianityJesus Christ Jesus
Jesus
in Christianity Son of God Virgin birth Ministry Crucifixion ResurrectionBible FoundationsOld Testament New Testament Gospel Canon Books Church Creed New CovenantTheologyGod TrinityFather Son Holy SpiritApologetics Baptism Christology History of theology Mission Patriology Pneumatology SalvationHistory TraditionMary Apostles Peter Paul Fathers Early Christianity Constantine Councils Augustine East–West Schism Crusades Aquinas Luther Reformation Radical ReformationRelated topicsArt
[...More...]

"Thomas Aquinas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gentile Da Fabriano
Gentile da Fabriano
Fabriano
(c. 1370 – 1427) was an Italian painter known for his participation in the International Gothic
International Gothic
painter style. He worked in various places in central Italy, mostly in Tuscany. His best-known works are his Adoration of the Magi from the Strozzi Altarpiece, (1423) and the Flight into Egypt.Contents1 Life and career 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Pseudo-Arabic
Pseudo-Arabic
script in the Virgin Mary's halo, detail of Adoration of the Magi (1423) by Gentile da Fabriano. The script is further divided by rosettes like those on Mamluk
Mamluk
dishes,[1] executed in pastigliaGentile was born in or near Fabriano, in the Marche. His mother died some time before 1380, and his father, Niccolò di Giovanni Massi, retired to a monastery in the same year, where he died in 1385
[...More...]

"Gentile Da Fabriano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Canonization
Canonization
Canonization
is the act by which a Christian church declares that a person who has died was a saint, upon which declaration the person is included in the "canon", or list, of recognized saints. Originally, a person was recognized as a saint without any formal process. Later, different processes were developed, such as those used today in the Anglican Communion, the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, and the Oriental Orthodox Church.Contents1 Historical development 2 Anglican Communion 3 Catholic Church3.1 Nature 3.2 Procedure prior to reservation to the Apostolic See 3.3 Exclusive reservation to the Apostolic See 3.4 Procedure from 1734–38 to 1983 3.5 Since 1983 3.6 Equipollent canonization4 Eastern Orthodox Church 5 Oriental Orthodox Church 6 See also 7 Notes 8 References 9 External linksHistorical development[edit] The first persons honored as saints were the martyrs
[...More...]

"Canonization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philosophy Of Mind
Philosophy
Philosophy
of mind is a branch of philosophy that studies the nature of the mind. The mind–body problem is a paradigm issue in philosophy of mind, although other issues are addressed, such as the hard problem of consciousness, and the nature of particular mental states.[2][3][4] Aspects of the mind that are studied include mental events, mental functions, mental properties, consciousness, the ontology of the mind, the nature of thought, and the relationship of the mind to the body. Dualism and monism are the two central schools of thought on the mind–body problem, although nuanced views have arisen that do not fit one or the other category neatly
[...More...]

"Philosophy Of Mind" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Logic
Logic
Logic
(from the Ancient Greek: λογική, translit. logikḗ[1]), originally meaning "the word" or "what is spoken", but coming to mean "thought" or "reason", is a subject concerned with the most general laws of truth,[2] and is now generally held to consist of the systematic study of the form of valid inference. A valid inference is one where there is a specific relation of logical support between the assumptions of the inference and its conclusion. (In ordinary discourse, inferences may be signified by words like therefore, hence, ergo, and so on.) There is no universal agreement as to the exact scope and subject matter of logic (see § Rival conceptions, below), but it has traditionally included the classification of arguments, the systematic exposition of the 'logical form' common to all valid arguments, the study of inference, including fallacies, and the study of semantics, including paradoxes
[...More...]

"Logic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

University Of Paris
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
[...More...]

"University Of Paris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Abbey Of Monte Cassino
Monte Cassino
Cassino
(sometimes written Montecassino) is a rocky hill about 130 kilometres (81 mi) southeast of Rome, in the Latin Valley, Italy, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) to the west of the town of Cassino and 520 m (1,706.04 ft) altitude. Site of the Roman town of Casinum, it is best known for its historic abbey. St. Benedict of Nursia established his first monastery, the source of the Benedictine Order, here around 529. The hilltop sanctuary was the site of the Battle of Monte Cassino
Battle of Monte Cassino
in 1944, where the building was destroyed by Allied bombing and rebuilt after the war. The site has been visited many times by Popes and other senior clergy, including Pope Benedict XVI
Benedict XVI
in May 2009. Since the reforms of the Second Vatican Council
Second Vatican Council
the monastery is one of the few remaining territorial abbeys within the Catholic Church
[...More...]

"Abbey Of Monte Cassino" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Valle Romita Polyptych
The Valle Romita Polyptych (Italian: Polittico di Valle Romita) is a painting by the Italian late Gothic painter Gentile da Fabriano, dating from c. 1410-1412 and now housed in the Pinacoteca di Brera in Milan. It was originally executed for the Franciscan hermitage of Valle Romita near Gentile's birthplace, Fabriano.Contents1 History 2 Description 3 Sources 4 External linksHistory[edit] There is no information about the painting's origins. It may have been commissioned by the lord of Fabriano, Chiavello Chiavelli, when in 1406 he had the local convent restored to house his future tomb. The painting would thus date from 1406 to 1414, when Gentile left the Marche and moved to Brescia under Pandolfo III Malatesta
[...More...]

"Valle Romita Polyptych" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Patron Saint
A patron saint, patroness saint, patron hallow or heavenly protector is a saint who in Roman Catholicism, Anglicanism, Eastern Orthodoxy, or particular branches of Islam, is regarded as the heavenly advocate of a nation, place, craft, activity, class, clan, family or person.[1][2][title missing][page needed] Catholics believe that patron saints, having already transcended to the metaphysical, are able to intercede effectively for the needs of their special charges.[3] Historically, a similar practice has also occurred in many Islamic lands
[...More...]

"Patron Saint" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Shrine
A shrine (Latin: scrinium "case or chest for books or papers"; Old French: escrin "box or case")[1] is a holy or sacred place, which is dedicated to a specific deity, ancestor, hero, martyr, saint, daemon, or similar figure of awe and respect, at which they are venerated or worshipped. Shrines often contain idols, relics, or other such objects associated with the figure being venerated.[2] A shrine at which votive offerings are made is called an altar. Shrines are found in many of the world's religions, including Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Chinese folk religion, Shinto, and Asatru as well as in secular and non-religious settings such as a war memorial
[...More...]

"Shrine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Avignon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Avignon
Avignon
(French pronunciation: ​[avi'ɲɔ̃]; Latin: Avenio; Occitan: Avignoun, Occitan: Avinhon pronounced [aviˈɲun]) is a commune in south-eastern France
France
in the department of Vaucluse
Vaucluse
on the left bank of the Rhône
Rhône
river
[...More...]

"Avignon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Socrates
Socrates
Socrates
(/ˈsɒkrətiːz/;[2] Ancient Greek: Σωκρᾰ́της, translit. Sōkrátēs, [sɔːkrátɛːs]; c. 470 – 399 BC)[3][4] was a classical Greek (Athenian) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy, and as being the first moral philosopher,[5][6] of the Western ethical tradition of thought.[7][8][9] An enigmatic figure, he made no writings, and is known chiefly through the accounts of classical writers writing after his lifetime, particularly his students Plato
Plato
and Xenophon. Other sources include the contemporaneous Antisthenes, Aristippus, and Aeschines of Sphettos
[...More...]

"Socrates" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kingdom Of Sicily
the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
(1194–1254) (also with the Kingdom of Jerusalem: 1225–1228) the Crown of Aragon
Crown of Aragon
(1412–1516) the
[...More...]

"Kingdom Of Sicily" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ascoli Piceno
Ascoli Piceno
Ascoli Piceno
([ˈaskoli piˈtʃɛːno]  listen (help·info); Latin: Asculum)[2] is a town and comune in the Marche
Marche
region of Italy, capital of the province of the same name. Its population is around 49,500[1] but the urban area of the city has more than 100,000.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Main sights3.1 Churches and convents 3.2 Secular buildings 3.3 Parks and gardens4 Economy 5 Transport 6 Education 7 Culture and sport 8 Gastronomy 9 Territorial subdivision 10 Notable people 11 International relations 12 See also 13 References 14 External linksGeography[edit] The town lies at the confluence of the Tronto
Tronto
River and the small river Castellano and is surrounded on three sides by mountains
[...More...]

"Ascoli Piceno" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anglican Communion
The Anglican
Anglican
Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members,[1][2] founded in 1867 in London, England. It consists of the Church of England
England
and national and regional Anglican episcopal polities in full communion with it,[3] with traditional origins of their doctrines summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). Archbishop
Archbishop
Justin Welby
Justin Welby
of Canterbury
Canterbury
acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares ("first among equals"), but does not exercise authority in the provinces outside England. The Anglican
Anglican
Communion was founded at the Lambeth Conference
Lambeth Conference
in 1867 in London, England, under the leadership of Charles Longley, Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
[...More...]

"Anglican Communion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.