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Thomas-Morse R-5
The Thomas-Morse R-5
Thomas-Morse R-5
also known as the TM-22 was an American single-engined parasol monoplane racing aircraft of the 1920s. Two were built for the United States Army Air Service
United States Army Air Service
in 1922, but after competing in the 1922 Pulitzer Trophy Race the type was abandoned.Contents1 Design and development 2 Operational history 3 Specifications 4 See also 5 ReferencesDesign and development[edit] In early 1922, the United States Army Air Service
United States Army Air Service
placed orders with a number of American manufacturers for Racing aircraft
Racing aircraft
to compete in the prestigious Pulitzer Trophy Race
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Racing Aircraft
Air racing
Air racing
is a highly specialised type of motorsport that involves airplanes or other types of aircraft that compete over a fixed course, with the winner either returning the shortest time, the one to complete it with the most points, or to come closest to a previously estimated time.Contents1 History 2 Historical championships 3 Active air races 4 Classes 5 Notable racing pilots 6 Racing airplanes 7 Cultural depictions 8 See also 9 Notes 10 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first 'heavier-than-air' air race was held on 23 May 1909 - the Prix de Lagatinerie, at the Port- Aviation
Aviation
airport south of Paris, France. Four pilots entered the race, two started, but nobody completed the full race distance; though this was not unexpected, as the rules specified that whoever travelled furthest would be the winner if no-one completed the race
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Selfridge Air National Guard Base
Selfridge Air National Guard
Air National Guard
Base or Selfridge ANGB (IATA: MTC, ICAO: KMTC, FAA LID: MTC) is an Air National Guard
Air National Guard
installation located in Harrison Township, Michigan, near Mount Clemens
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Flight International
Flight International (or simply Flight) is a weekly magazine focused on aerospace, published in the United Kingdom. Founded in 1909 as "A Journal devoted to the Interests, Practice, and Progress of Aerial Locomotion and Transport",[1] it is the world's oldest continuously published aviation news magazine.[2] Flight International is published by Reed Business Information.[3] Competitors include Jane's Information Group and Aviation Week. Former editors of, and contributors to, Flight include Bill Gunston and John W. R
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Peter M. Bowers
Peter M. Bowers
Peter M. Bowers
(15 May 1918 - 27 April 2003) was a journalist specializing in the field of aviation. Bowers is famed in the general aviation community for his work with General Aviation
Aviation
News. Writing 26 books and over 800 articles detailing historic aircraft for a column called "Of Wings and Things", Bowers was a fixture of the newspaper for decades. Also an engineer at Boeing, he was an avid aviation photographer and also designed homebuilt aircraft such as the Fly Baby and Namu II. Bowers also completed and flew a Detroit G1 Gull
Detroit G1 Gull
primary glider.[1][2] Bowers lived in Seattle
Seattle
for most of his life. He spent five years in the U.S
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United States Of America
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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McCook Field
McCook Field
McCook Field
was an airfield and aviation experimentation station in Ohio. It was operated by the Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps
Aviation Section, U.S. Signal Corps
and its successor the United States Army Air Service
United States Army Air Service
from 1917 to 1927. It was named for Alexander McDowell McCook, an American Civil War
American Civil War
general and his brothers and cousins, who were collectively known as "The Fighting McCooks".Contents1 History 2 Achievements 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] In 1917, anticipating a massive need for military airplanes by the United States during World War I, six Dayton businessmen including Edward A. Deeds formed the Dayton-Wright Airplane Company
Dayton-Wright Airplane Company
in Dayton, Ohio
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Clayton Bissell
Air Service, United States
United States
Army148th Aero SquadronCommands held 10th Air ForceBattles/wars   World War I World War IIAwards Distinguished Service Cross Distinguished Service Medal (2) Silver Star Distinguished Flying Cross Distinguished Flying Cross (U.K.) Air MedalOther work Commanded U.S
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Lieutenant
A lieutenant (abbreviated Lt, LT, Lieut and similar) is a junior commissioned officer in the armed forces, fire services, police and other organizations of many nations. The meaning of lieutenant differs in different military formations (see comparative military ranks), but is often subdivided into senior (first lieutenant) and junior (second lieutenant) ranks. In navies it is often equivalent to the army rank of captain; it may also indicate a particular post rather than a rank. The rank is also used in fire services, emergency medical services, security services and police forces. Lieutenant
Lieutenant
may also appear as part of a title used in various other organisations with a codified command structure. It often designates someone who is "second-in-command", and as such, may precede the name of the rank directly above it
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Frank O'Driscoll Hunter
Frank O'Driscoll Hunter
Frank O'Driscoll Hunter
(December 8, 1894 – June 25, 1982) was a World War I
World War I
flying ace, being credited by the United States
United States
Army Air Service with downing nine enemy aircraft. Hunter became an advocate of fighter aircraft strategy and tactics
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Captain (land)
The army rank of captain (from the French capitaine) is a commissioned officer rank historically corresponding to the command of a company of soldiers. The rank is also used by some air forces and marine forces. Today, a captain is typically either the commander or second-in-command of a company or artillery battery (or United States Army cavalry troop or Commonwealth squadron). In the Chinese People's Liberation Army, a captain may also command a company, or be the second-in-command of a battalion. In NATO
NATO
countries, the rank of captain is described by the code OF-2 and is one rank above an OF-1 (lieutenant or first lieutenant) and one below an OF-3 (major or commandant)
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Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
(/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the ( Ojibwe
Ojibwe
word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake".[3][7] Michigan
Michigan
is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River.[b] Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan
Michigan
is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan
Michigan
was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten
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Dayton, Ohio
Dayton (/ˈdeɪtən/) is the sixth-largest city in the state of Ohio and the county seat of Montgomery County.[5] A small part of the city extends into Greene County.[6] In the 2010 census, the population was 141,759, and the Dayton metropolitan area
Dayton metropolitan area
had 799,232 residents, making it Ohio's fourth-largest metropolitan area, after Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Columbus, and the 63rd-largest in the United States.[7] The Dayton-Springfield-Greenville Combined Statistical Area had a population of 1,080,044 in 2010, making it the 43rd-largest in the United States.[8] Dayton is within O
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Conventional Landing Gear
Conventional landing gear, or tailwheel-type landing gear, is an aircraft undercarriage consisting of two main wheels forward of the center of gravity and a small wheel or skid to support the tail.[1][2] The term taildragger is also used, although some claim it should apply only to those aircraft with a tailskid rather than a wheel.[2][3] The term "conventional" persists for historical reasons, but all modern jet aircraft and most modern propeller aircraft use tricycle gear.Contents1 History 2 Advantages 3 Disadvantages 4 Jet-powered tailwheel aircraft 5 Monowheel undercarriage 6 Training 7 Techniques 8 Examples8.1 Airplanes 8.2 Helicopters9 Modifications of tricycle gear aircraft 10 References10.1 Citations 10.2 BibliographyHistory[edit]Tailwheel detail on a Tiger Moth biplaneLike many attack helicopters, the
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