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Thirty-nine Articles
The Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
of Religion (commonly abbreviated as the Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
or the XXXIX Articles) are the historically defining statements of doctrines and practices of the Church of England with respect to the controversies of the English Reformation. The Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
form part of the Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer
used by both the Church of England
Church of England
and the Episcopal Church. Several versions are available online. When Henry VIII
Henry VIII
broke with the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
and was excommunicated, he formed a new Church of England, which would be headed by the monarch (himself) rather than the pope
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Book Of Kings (other)
Book of Kings may refer to:The Books of Kings
Books of Kings
in the Bible The Shahnama, an 11th-century epic Persian poem The Morgan Bible, a French medieval picture bible The Pararaton, a 16th-century Javanese history of southeast Asia The Book of Kings, a 1999 World War II novel by James Thackara The Book of Kings, a 2011 funeral doom metal album by Mournful CongregationSee also[edit]King's Book Book of shu-kingThis disambiguation page lists articles associated wi
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Architecture Of The Medieval Cathedrals Of England
The medieval cathedrals of England, which date from between approximately 1040 and 1540, are a group of twenty-six buildings that constitute a major aspect of the country’s artistic heritage and are among the most significant material symbols of Christianity. Though diversified in style, they are united by a common function. As cathedrals, each of these buildings serves as central church for an administrative region (or diocese) and houses the throne of a bishop ( Late Latin
Late Latin
ecclēsia cathedrālis, from the Greek, καθέδρα).[1] Each cathedral also serves as a regional centre and a focus of regional pride and affection.[2] Only sixteen of these buildings had been cathedrals at the time of the Reformation: eight that were served by secular canons, and eight that were monastic
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Bede
Bede
Bede
(/biːd/ BEED; Old English: Bǣda, Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable
Venerable
Bede, and Bede
Bede
the Venerable (Latin: Bēda Venerābilis), was an English monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles
Angles
(contemporarily Monkwearmouth– Jarrow
Jarrow
Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England). Born on lands likely belonging to the Monkwearmouth monastery, Bede
Bede
was sent there at the age of seven and later joined Abbot
Abbot
Ceolfrith
Ceolfrith
at the Jarrow
Jarrow
monastery, both of whom survived a plague that struck in 686, an outbreak that killed a majority of the population there
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Augustine Of Canterbury
Augustine of Canterbury
Canterbury
(born first third of the 6th century – died probably 26 May 604) was a Catholic
Catholic
Benedictine monk who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
in the year 597. He is considered the "Apostle to the English" and a founder of the Catholic
Catholic
Church in England.[3] Augustine was the prior of a monastery in Rome
Rome
when Pope Gregory the Great chose him in 595 to lead a mission, usually known as the Gregorian mission, to Britain to Christianize King Æthelberht and his Kingdom of Kent
Kent
from Anglo-Saxon paganism. Kent
Kent
was probably chosen because Æthelberht had married a Christian princess, Bertha, daughter of Charibert I
Charibert I
the King of Paris, who was expected to exert some influence over her husband
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Celtic Christianity
Celtic Christianity
Christianity
or Insular Christianity
Christianity
refers broadly to certain features of Christianity
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Christian Church
The Christian
Christian
Church is an ecclesiological term generally used by Protestants to refer to the whole group of people belonging to the Christianity
Christianity
throughout history. In this understanding, the "Christian Church" does not refer to a particular Christian denomination
Christian denomination
but to the body of all believers. Some Christian
Christian
traditions, however, believe that the term " Christian
Christian
Church" or "Church" applies only to a specific historic Christian
Christian
body or institution (e.g., the Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, the Non-Chalcedonian Churches of Oriental Orthodoxy, or the Assyrian Church of the East)
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Christ (title)
In Christianity, Christ[Notes 1] (Greek Χριστός, Christós, meaning "the anointed one") is a title for the saviour and redeemer who would bring salvation to the Jewish people
Jewish people
and mankind. Christians believe Jesus
Jesus
is the Jewish messiah called Christ in both the Hebrew Bible
Bible
and the Christian
Christian
Old Testament. Christ, used by Christians
Christians
as both a name and a title, is synonymous with Jesus.[5][6][7] The role of the Christ in Christianity
Christianity
originated from the concept of the messiah in Judaism
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Jesus In Christianity
In Christianity, Jesus
Jesus
is believed to be the Messiah
Messiah
(Christ) and through his crucifixion and resurrection, humans can be reconciled to God and thereby are offered salvation and the promise of eternal life.[2] These teachings emphasize that as the willing Lamb of God, Jesus
Jesus
chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary
Calvary
as a sign of his full obedience to the will of God the Father, as an "agent and servant of God".[3][4] The choice Jesus
Jesus
made thus counter-positions him as a new man of morality and obedience, in contrast to Adam's disobedience.[5] Christians believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and divine—the Son of God
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Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury
Canterbury
Cathedral
Cathedral
in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England. It forms part of a World Heritage Site. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury, currently Justin Welby, leader of the Church of England
Church of England
and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion; the archbishop, being suitably occupied with national and international matters, delegates most of his functions as diocesan bishop to the Bishop
Bishop
suffragan of Dover, currently Trevor Willmott. Its formal title is the Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury. Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt from 1070 to 1077
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Christian Theology
Christian
Christian
theology is the theology of Christian
Christian
belief and practice.[1] Such study concentrates primarily upon the texts of the Old Testament
Old Testament
and of the New Testament, as well as on Christian tradition. Christian
Christian
theologians use biblical exegesis, rational analysis and argument
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History Of The Anglican Communion
The history of the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
may be attributed mainly to the worldwide spread of British culture
British culture
associated with the British Empire
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Paul The Apostle
Paul the Apostle
Paul the Apostle
(Latin: Paulus; Greek: Παῦλος, translit. Paulos, Coptic: ⲡⲁⲩⲗⲟⲥ; c. 5 – c. 67), commonly known as Saint
Saint
Paul and also known by his Jewish name Saul of Tarsus (Hebrew: שאול התרסי‎, translit. Sha'ul ha-Tarsi; Greek: Σαῦλος Ταρσεύς, translit. Saulos Tarseus),[4][5][6] was an apostle (though not one of the Twelve Apostles) who taught the gospel of the Christ
Christ
to the first century world.[7] Paul is generally considered one of the most important figures of the Apostolic Age[8][9] and in the mid-30s to the mid-50s AD he founded several churches in Asia Minor and Europe. He took advantage of his status as both a Jew
Jew
and a Roman citizen
Roman citizen
to minister to both Jewish and Roman audiences
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First Seven Ecumenical Councils
In the history of Christianity, the first seven ecumenical councils, include the following: the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
in 325, the First Council of Constantinople
Constantinople
in 381, the
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Anglican Marian Theology
Anglican Marian theology
Anglican Marian theology
is the summation of the doctrines and beliefs of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
concerning the Blessed Virgin Mary. As Anglicans believe that Jesus
Jesus
was both human and God the Son, the second Person of the Trinity, within the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
and Continuing Anglican churches, Mary is accorded honour as the theotokos, literally the "God-bearer" or "one who gives birth to God". Anglicans of evangelical or low church tradition tend to avoid honouring Mary. Other Anglicans respect and honour Mary because of the special religious significance that she has within Christianity
Christianity
as the mother of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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