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Third Age
In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, the history of the fictional universe of began when the Ainur entered Arda, following the creation events in the Ainulindalë
Ainulindalë
and long ages of labour throughout Eä, the universe. Time from that point was measured using Valian Years, though the subsequent history of Arda was divided into three time periods using different years, known as the Years of the Lamps, the Years of the Trees and the Years of the Sun. A separate, overlapping chronology divides the history into 'Ages of the Children of Ilúvatar'. The first such Age began with the Awakening of the Elves during the Years of the Trees and continued for the first six centuries of the Years of the Sun. All the subsequent Ages took place during the Years of the Sun
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Nandor (Middle-earth)
In the fictional world of J. R. R. Tolkien, the Nandor (singular Nando) were Elves of the Teleri, the third clan of Elves.Contents1 Internal history 2 Nandorin 3 See also 4 ReferencesInternal history[edit] When the marching Elves reached the Hithaeglir (Misty Mountains) some left the Great Journey
Great Journey
under their leader Lenwë (Dan or Denweg in Nandorin). These Elves turned south along the Great River (Anduin). Nandor means in Quenya
Quenya
"those who turned back". Many years later a group of Nandor under Denethor, son of Lenwë, crossed the Ered Luin
Ered Luin
into Ossiriand, which was after named Lindon, or Land of the singers, after these elves
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Ainu (Middle-earth)
The Ainur are the immortal spirits existing before Creation in J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional universe. These were the first beings made of the thought of Eru Ilúvatar.[1] Fictional history[edit] Before the Creation, Eru Ilúvatar made the Ainur or "holy ones". This Quenya
Quenya
name comes from the Elvish root ayan- "revere, treat with awe".[2] "Ainur only appears in plural [in Elvish texts] since after the Creation all those were Maiar includes Valar and their lesser kin, but not those who did not take part in the Great Theme, or else did not enter Eä."[2] This means that only apocryphal texts written by Men or by Hobbits used the singular Ainu. The Universe was created through the Music of the Ainur
Music of the Ainur
or Ainulindalë, music sung by the Ainur in response to themes introduced by Eru. This universe, the song endowed with existence by Eru, was called in Quenya. The Earth was called Arda
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Aman (Middle-earth)
Aman is a fictional place in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, also known as the Undying Lands or Blessed Realm, it is the home of the Valar, and three kindreds of Elves: the Vanyar, some of the Noldor, and some of the Teleri.Contents1 Internal setting1.1 Geography1.1.1 Eldamar1.1.1.1 Calacirya 1.1.1.2 Tirion 1.1.1.3 Alqualondë1.2 History2 See also 3 References 4 External linksInternal setting[edit] Geography[edit] Aman was a continent far to the west of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
across the great ocean Belegaer. The island of Tol Eressëa lies just off its eastern shore
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Yavanna
Yavanna [jaˈvanːa] is a fictional character from J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, written about in The Silmarillion.[1] In Tolkien's pantheon, Yavanna is the goddess of Kelvar (Fauna) and Olvar (Flora).[2] She is the elder sister of Vána, and is the spouse of Aulë. Yavanna was responsible for the creation of the Two Trees as well as the provider of the fruit that created the Sun and the Moon, resulting in the end of the Sleep of Yavanna. Yavanna is the creator of "all things that grow" and planted the first seeds of Arda:The spouse of Aulë is Yavanna, the Giver of Fruits
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Earth
Earth
Earth
is the third planet from the Sun
Sun
and the only object in the Universe
Universe
known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other sources of evidence, Earth
Earth
formed over 4.5 billion years ago.[24][25][26] Earth's gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun
Sun
and the Moon, Earth's only natural satellite. Earth
Earth
revolves around the Sun
Sun
in 365.26 days, a period known as an Earth
Earth
year
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Man (Middle-earth)
A man is a male human. The term man is usually reserved for an adult male, with the term boy being the usual term for a male child or adolescent. However, the term man is also sometimes used to identify a male human, regardless of age, as in phrases such as "men's basketball". Like most other male mammals, a man's genome typically inherits an X chromosome from his mother and a Y chromosome from his father. The male fetus produces larger amounts of androgens and smaller amounts of estrogens than a female fetus. This difference in the relative amounts of these sex steroids is largely responsible for the physiological differences that distinguish men from women. During puberty, hormones which stimulate androgen production result in the development of secondary sexual characteristics, thus exhibiting greater differences between the sexes
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Eru Ilúvatar
Eru Ilúvatar is a fictional character in J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-earth legendarium. He is introduced in The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion
as the supreme being of the universe, creator of all existence. In Tolkien's invented Elvish language Quenya, Eru means "The One", or "He that is Alone"[1] and Ilúvatar signifies "Allfather".[2] The names appear in Tolkien's work both in isolation and paired (Eru Ilúvatar).Contents1 Eru as Creator 2 Eru's direct interventions 3 Tolkien
Tolkien
on Eru 4 Inspiration and development 5 References 6 External linksEru as Creator[edit]This Middle-earth-related Section describes a work or element of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. Please help rewrite it to explain the fiction more clearly and provide non-fictional perspective. (October 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Eru was the supreme being, God
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Eagle (Middle-earth)
Eagle
Eagle
is the common name for many large birds of prey of the family Accipitridae. Eagles belong to several groups of genera, not all of which are closely related. Most of the 60 species of eagle are from Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa.[1] Outside this area, just 14 species can be found—2 in North America, 9 in Central and South America, and 3 in Australia.Contents1 Description 2 Distribution 3 Groups3.1 Fish eagles 3.2 Booted eagles 3.3 Snake
Snake
eagles 3.4 Harpy eagles4 Species 5 Eagles in culture5.1 Etymology 5.2 Religion
Religion
and folklore 5.3 Heraldry6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksDescription Eagles are large, powerfully built birds of prey, with heavy heads and beaks. Even the smallest eagles, such as the booted eagle (Aquila pennata), which is comparable in size to a common buzzard (Buteo buteo) or red-tailed hawk (B
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Manwë
Manwë [ˈmanwe] is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth
Middle-earth
legendarium. He appears in The Silmarillion. Manwë was the King of the Valar, husband of Varda Elentári, was conceived in the thought of Iluvatar as a brother of Melkor, and King of Arda. He lived atop Mount Taniquetil, the highest mountain of the world, in the halls of Ilmarin, in the realm of Valinor. The winds, airs and birds were his servants, and he was lord of air, wind, and clouds in Arda. He was the noblest and greatest in authority of the Valar, and less powerful only than Melkor.[1] Fictional background[edit] Manwë was (with his brother Melkor, i.e. Morgoth) the greatest of the Ainur, and the one that best understood the will of Eru. When Melkor created the discord in the Music of the Ainur, Manwë took over leading the song
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Children Of Ilúvatar
The Children of Ilúvatar is the name given to the two races of Elves and Men in J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth
Middle-earth
legendarium because they were created by Ilúvatar, the One God, without the help of the Ainur. The story of their creation is told in the Quenta Silmarillion. Elves are also named the Minnónar in Quenya[1] ("Firstborn") and Men are the Apanónar ("Those born after" or "Afterborn") because the Elves were the first of the Children of Ilúvatar to awake in Middle-earth, whereas Men were not intended to follow until the beginning of the First Age many years later. References[edit]^ J.R.R. Tolkien. The War of the Jewels, p. 403. Middle-earth
Middle-earth
portalv t eJ. R. R
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The cosmology of J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium combines aspects of Christian theology
Christian theology
and metaphysics, mythology (especially Germanic mythology) and pre-modern cosmological concepts in the flat Earth paradigm with the modern spherical Earth view of the solar system.[1] Tolkien's cosmology is based on a clear dualism between the spiritual and the material world. While the Ainur, the first created but immaterial angelic beings have the "subcreative" power of imagination, the power to create independent life or physical reality is reserved for Eru Ilúvatar (God); this power of (primary) creation is expressed by the concept of a "Secret Fire" or "Flame Imperishable". The term for the material universe is Eä, "the World that Is", as distinguished from the purely idealist pre-figuration of creation in the minds of the Ainur
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Legendarium
Tolkien's legendarium is the body of J. R. R
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Varda
Varda Elentári [ˈvarda elenˈtaːri] is a fictional character in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. She appears in Tolkien's Silmarillion
Silmarillion
as one of the Valar (powers) of Middle Earth. The longest sample of the Sindarin
Sindarin
language published by Tolkien, is addressed to her. She is also known as Elbereth Gilthoniel.Contents1 Character description 2 Names 3 Invocations in Lord of the Rings 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCharacter description[edit] Varda is one of the Valar, the pantheon or gods in the legendarium. She is one of the greatest of the Valar
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Fictional Universe
A fictional universe is a self-consistent setting with events, and often other elements, that differ from the real world
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Maiar
The Maiar (singular: Maia) are beings from J. R. R. Tolkien's high fantasy legendarium. They are lesser Ainur who entered Eä in the beginning of time. The name Maiar is in the Quenya
Quenya
tongue (one of the languages invented by Tolkien) and comes from the Elvish root maya- "excellent, admirable".[1] Maiar refers in Quenya
Quenya
to all the Ainur who entered Eä, the "Creation", and more often to the lesser power among them: "Maia is the name of the Kin of the Valar, but especially of those of lesser power than the 9 great rulers" wrote Tolkien.[1] In the Valaquenta, Tolkien wrote that the Maiar are "spirits whose being also began before the world, of the same order as the Valar but of less degree"
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