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They Live By Night
They Live by Night
They Live by Night
is a 1948 American film noir, based on Edward Anderson's Depression era novel Thieves Like Us. The film was directed by Nicholas Ray
Nicholas Ray
(his first feature film) and starred Farley Granger
Farley Granger
as "Bowie" Bowers and Cathy O'Donnell
Cathy O'Donnell
as "Keechie" Mobley. The movie is the prototype for the "couple on the run" genre, and is generally seen as the forerunner to the movie Bonnie and Clyde. Robert Altman directed a version using the original title of the novel, Thieves Like Us (1974).Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Casting 5 Reception 6 References 7 External linksPlot[edit] Bowie (Granger) escapes from prison with bank robbers Chicamaw (DaSilva) and T-Dub (Flippen). Bowie was unfairly convicted of murder. The three plan to rob a bank. Bowie needs the money to hire a lawyer to prove he is innocent
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The Cradle Will Rock
The Cradle Will Rock
Cradle Will Rock
is a 1937 play in music by Marc Blitzstein. Originally a part of the Federal Theatre Project, it was directed by Orson Welles, and produced by John Houseman. The musical is a Brechtian allegory of corruption and corporate greed and includes a panoply of societal figures. Set in "Steeltown, USA", it follows the efforts of Larry Foreman to unionize the town's workers and combat wicked, greedy businessman Mr. Mister, who controls the town's factory, press, church and social organization
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United States Department Of Agriculture
The United States Department of Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
(USDA), also known as the Agriculture Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for developing and executing federal laws related to farming, agriculture, forestry, and food. It aims to meet the needs of farmers and ranchers, promote agricultural trade and production, work to assure food safety, protect natural resources, foster rural communities and end hunger in the United States and internationally. Approximately 80% of the USDA's $141 billion budget goes to the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) program
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James Wong Howe
James Wong Howe, A.S.C. (Chinese: 黃宗霑; pinyin: Huáng Zōngzhān; August 28, 1899 – July 12, 1976) was a Chinese-born American cinematographer who worked on over 130 films. He was a master at the use of shadow and was one of the first to use deep-focus cinematography, in which both foreground and distant planes remain in focus. During the 1930s and 1940s, Howe was one of the most sought after cinematographers in Hollywood. He was nominated for 10 Academy Awards for cinematography, winning twice for The Rose Tattoo (1955) and Hud (1963)
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Picnic (1955 Film)
Picnic is a 1955 American Technicolor
Technicolor
romantic comedy-drama film filmed in Cinemascope.[3][4] It was adapted for the screen by Daniel Taradash from William Inge's 1953 Pulitzer Prize-winning play of the same name.[5] Joshua Logan, director of the original Broadway stage production, directed the film version, which stars William Holden, Kim Novak, and Rosalind Russell, with Susan Strasberg
Susan Strasberg
and Cliff Robertson in supporting roles. Picnic was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, and won two. The film dramatizes 24 hours in the life of a small Kansas town in the mid-20th century. It revolves around the Labor Day
Labor Day
holiday
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Orson Welles
George Orson Welles
Orson Welles
(/wɛlz/; May 6, 1915 – October 10, 1985) was an American actor, director, writer, and producer who worked in theatre, radio, and film. He is remembered for his innovative[1] work in all three: in theatre, most notably Caesar (1937), a Broadway adaptation of William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar; in radio, the legendary[2] 1938 broadcast "The War of the Worlds"; and in film, Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
(1941), consistently ranked as one of the greatest films ever made. In his 20s, Welles directed a number of high-profile stage productions for the Federal Theatre Project, including an adaptation of Macbeth with an entirely African American cast, and the political musical The Cradle Will Rock. In 1937 he and John Houseman
John Houseman
founded the Mercury Theatre, an independent repertory theatre company that presented a series of productions on Broadway through 1941
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Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
is a 1941 American mystery drama film by Orson Welles, its producer, co-screenwriter, director and star. The picture was Welles's first feature film. Nominated for Academy Awards in nine categories, it won an Academy Award for Best Writing (Original Screenplay) by Herman J. Mankiewicz
Herman J. Mankiewicz
and Welles. Considered by many critics, filmmakers, and fans to be the greatest film of all time, Citizen Kane
Citizen Kane
was voted as such in five consecutive British Film Institute Sight & Sound polls of critics, until it was displaced by Vertigo in the 2012 poll. It topped the American Film Institute's 100 Years ... 100 Movies list in 1998, as well as its 2007 update
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Encino, Los Angeles
Encino is a neighborhood in the San Fernando Valley
San Fernando Valley
region of Los Angeles, California, United States.Contents1 History 2 Population 3 Geography 4 Economy 5 Government and infrastructure 6 Education6.1 Public 6.2 Private7 Parks and recreation 8 Notable people 9 Media 10 Notable attractions 11 Views of Encino 12 See also 13 References13.1 Works cited14 External linksHistory[edit]Rancho Encino plat map of 1873In 1769, the Spanish Portola expedition, first Europeans to see inland areas of California, traveled north through Sepulveda pass into the San Fernando Valley
San Fernando Valley
on August 5 and stayed two nights at a native village near what is now Los Encinos State Historic Park. Fray Juan Crespi, a Franciscan missionary travelling with the expedition, named the valley "El Valle de Santa Catalina de Bononia de Los Encinos" (The Valley of St
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Howard Hughes
Howard Robard Hughes Jr. (December 24, 1905 – April 5, 1976) was an American business magnate, investor, record-setting pilot, film director, and philanthropist, known during his lifetime as one of the most financially successful individuals in the world. He first made a name for himself as a film producer, and then became an influential figure in the aviation industry. Later in life, he became known for his eccentric behavior and reclusive lifestyle—oddities that were caused in part by a worsening obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), chronic pain from several plane crashes, and increasing deafness. As a maverick film tycoon, Hughes gained prominence in Hollywood beginning in the late 1920s, when he produced big-budget and often controversial films like The Racket (1928),[4] Hell's Angels (1930),[5] and Scarface (1932)
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Gavin Lambert
Gavin Lambert (23 July 1924 – 17 July 2005) was a British-born screenwriter, novelist and biographer who lived for part of his life in Hollywood. His writing was mainly fiction and nonfiction about the film industry.Contents1 Personal life 2 Writing achievements2.1 Screenplays 2.2 Biographies and non-fiction 2.3 Novels and short stories3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksPersonal life[edit] Lambert was educated at Cheltenham College and Magdalen College, Oxford, where one of his professors was C. S
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Alfred Hitchcock
Sir
Sir
Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE
KBE
(13 August 1899 – 29 April 1980) was an English film director and producer, widely regarded as one of the most influential filmmakers in the history of cinema. He directed 53 feature films[a] in a career spanning six decades, becoming as well-known as any of his actors thanks to his many interviews, his cameo roles in most of his films, and his hosting of Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955–1965). Born on the outskirts of London, Hitchcock entered the film industry in 1919 as a title card designer after training as a technical clerk and copy writer for a telegraph-cable company
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Bonnie And Clyde (film)
Bonnie and Clyde
Bonnie and Clyde
is a 1967 American biographical crime film directed by Arthur Penn
Arthur Penn
and starring Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
and Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
as the title characters Clyde Barrow
Clyde Barrow
and Bonnie Parker. The film features Michael J. Pollard, Gene Hackman, and Estelle Parsons, with Denver Pyle, Dub Taylor, Gene Wilder, Evans Evans, and Mabel Cavitt in supporting roles. The screenplay was written by David Newman and Robert Benton. Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Beatty provided uncredited contributions to the script; Beatty also produced the film
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Novel
A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally in prose, which is typically published as a book. The genre has been described as having "a continuous and comprehensive history of about two thousand years,"[1] with its origins in classical Greece and Rome, in medieval and early modern romance, and in the tradition of the novella. The latter, an Italian word for a short story to distinguish it from a novel, has been used in English since the 18th century for a work that falls somewhere in between. Ian Watt, in The Rise of the Novel, suggested in 1957 that the novel first came into being in the early 18th century. Miguel de Cervantes
Miguel de Cervantes
author of Don Quixote
Don Quixote
(the first part of which was published in 1605), is frequently cited as the first significant European novelist of the modern era.[2] The romance is a closely related long prose narrative
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Rope (film)
Rope is a 1948 American psychological crime thriller film noir directed by Alfred Hitchcock, based on the 1929 play of the same name by Patrick Hamilton, adapted by Hume Cronyn
Hume Cronyn
and with a screenplay by Arthur Laurents.[4] The film was produced by Hitchcock and Sidney Bernstein as the first of their Transatlantic Pictures productions
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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