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Theologian
Theology
Theology
is the critical study of the nature of the divine
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God In Jainism
In Jainism, godliness is said to be the inherent quality of every soul. This quality, however, is subdued by the soul's association with karmic matter. All souls who have achieved the natural state of infinite bliss, infinite knowledge (kevala jnana), infinite power and infinite perception are regarded as ' God
God
in Jainism'. Jainism
Jainism
rejects the idea of a creator deity responsible for the manifestation, creation, or maintenance of this universe. According to Jain doctrine, the universe and its constituents (soul, matter, space, time, and principles of motion) have always existed
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Supreme Being
Supreme Being
Supreme Being
is a term used by theologians and philosophers of many religions, including Christianity, Islam,[1] Hinduism,[2] Judaism, Sikhism, Jainism, Deism[3] and Zoroastrianism
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Theism
Theism
Theism
is broadly defined as the belief in the existence of the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
or deities.[1][2] In common parlance, or when contrasted with deism, the term often describes the classical conception of God that is found in monotheism (also referred to as classical theism) or gods found in polytheistic religions—a belief in God
God
or in gods without the rejection of revelation as is characteristic of deism. [3][4] Atheism
Atheism
is commonly understood as rejection of theism in the broadest sense of theism, i.e
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Conceptions Of God
Conceptions of God
God
in monotheist, pantheist, and panentheist religions – or of the supreme deity in henotheistic religions – can extend to various levels of abstraction:as a powerful, human-like, supernatural being, or as the deification of an esoteric, mystical or philosophical entity or category; as the "Ultimate", the summum bonum, the "Absolute Infinite", the "Transcendent", or Existence or Being
Being
itself; as the ground of being, the monistic substrate, that which we cannot understand; and so on.The first recordings that survive of monotheistic conceptions of God, borne out of henotheism and (mostly in Eastern religions) monism, are from the Hellenistic period
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Demiurge
In the Platonic, Neopythagorean, Middle Platonic, and Neoplatonic schools of philosophy, the demiurge (/ˈdɛmiˌɜːrdʒ/) is an artisan-like figure responsible for fashioning and maintaining the physical universe. The term was adopted by the Gnostics. Although a fashioner, the demiurge is not necessarily the same as the creator figure in the monotheistic sense, because the demiurge itself and the material from which the demiurge fashions the universe are both considered to be consequences of something else. Depending on the system, they may be considered to be either uncreated and eternal, or considered to be the product of some other entity. The word "demiurge" is an English word from demiurgus, a Latinized form of the Greek δημιουργός or dēmiourgos
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Deus
Deus
Deus
( Latin
Latin
pronunciation: [ˈdeːʊs]) is Latin
Latin
for "god" or "deity". Latin
Latin
deus and dīvus "divine", are descended from Proto-Indo-European *deiwos, "celestial" or "shining", from the same root as *Dyēus, the reconstructed chief god of the Proto-Indo-European pantheon. In Classical Latin, deus (feminine dea) was a general noun[1] referring to a deity, while in technical usage a divus or diva was a figure who had become divine, such as a divinized emperor. In Late Latin, Deus
Deus
came to be used mostly for the Christian God
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Creator In Buddhism
Creator in Buddhism
Buddhism
is not Gautama Buddha. Buddhist
Buddhist
thought consistently rejects the notion of a creator deity.[1][2] It teaches the concept of gods, heavens and rebirths in its Saṃsāra
Saṃsāra
doctrine, but it considers none of these gods as a creator. Buddhism
Buddhism
posits that mundane deities such as Mahabrahma are misconstrued to be a creator.[3] Buddhism
Buddhism
states that the universe is created and governed by the five cosmic laws (Niyama Dhamma), namely Utu Niyama, Bija Niyama, Kamma Niyama, Citta Niyama, and Dhamma Niyama. These cosmic laws have been seen by many as the main difference between Buddhism and other religions. Creator in Pali
Pali
is Atthi Ajatang Abhutang Akatang Asamkhatang which means "a not-born, a not-brought-to-being, a not-made, a not-conditioned"
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Monad (philosophy)
Monad (from Greek μονάς monas, "singularity" in turn from μόνος monos, "alone"),[1] refers in cosmogony (creation theories) to the first being, divinity, or the totality of all beings. The concept was reportedly conceived by the Pythagoreans
Pythagoreans
and may refer variously to a single source acting alone, or to an indivisible origin, or to both. The concept was later adopted by other philosophers, such as Leibniz, who referred to the monad as an elementary particle
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Mother Goddess
A mother goddess is a goddess who represents, or is a personification of nature, motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction or who embodies the bounty of the Earth. When equated with the Earth
Earth
or the natural world, such goddesses are sometimes referred to as Mother Earth
Earth
or as the Earth
Earth
Mother. There is difference of opinion between the academic and the popular conception of the term. The popular view is mainly driven by the Goddess
Goddess
movement and reads that primitive societies initially were matriarchal, worshipping a sovereign, nurturing, motherly earth goddess. This was based upon the nineteenth-century ideas of unilineal evolution of Johann Jakob Bachofen
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God The Sustainer
God
God
the Sustainer is a theological term referring to the conception of God
God
who sustains and upholds everything in existence. Al Qayyum, sometimes rendered "The Sustainer" is one of the 99 Names of God
God
in Islam. "Creater, Sustainer, Redeemer" is reportedly a "common phrase" in Protestantism in the United States, specifically in Baptist liturgy.[1]Contents1 Christian theology 2 In Islam 3 Hinduism 4 Pantheism
Pantheism
and pandeism 5 ReferencesChristian theology[edit] In the Christian theology, the described doctrine is supported by the following biblical and Deuterocanonical
Deuterocanonical
references:Wisdom 11:21-26: “For you love all things that exist, and detest none of the things that you have made; for you would not have made anything if you had hated it
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Pantheism
Pantheism
Pantheism
is the belief that all reality is identical with divinity,[1] or that everything composes an all-encompassing, immanent god.[2] Pantheists do not believe in a distinct personal or anthropomorphic god[3] and hold a broad range of doctrines differing with regards to the forms of and relationships between divinity and reality.[4] Pantheism
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The All
The All
The All
(also called The One, The Absolute, The Great One, The Creator, The Supreme Mind, The Supreme Good, The Father, and The All Mother) is the Hermetic, pantheistic, pandeistic or panentheistic view of God, which is that everything that is, or at least that can be experienced, collectively makes up The All
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God In Hinduism
The concept of God
God
in Hinduism
Hinduism
varies in its diverse traditions.[1][2][3] Hinduism
Hinduism
spans a wide range of beliefs such as henotheism, monotheism, polytheism, panentheism, pantheism, pandeism, monism, atheism and nontheism.[1][4][5] Forms of theism find mention in the Bhagavad Gita
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Personal God
A personal god is a deity who can be related to as a person[1] instead of as an impersonal force, such as the Absolute, "the All", or the "Ground of Being". In the scriptures of the Abrahamic religions, God
God
is described as being a personal creator, speaking in the first person and showing emotion such as anger and pride, and sometimes appearing in anthropomorphic shape.[2] In the Pentateuch, for example, God
God
talks with and instructs his prophets and is conceived as possessing volition, emotions (such as anger, grief and happiness), intention, and other attributes characteristic of a human person
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