HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Theatre Royal, Haymarket
The Theatre Royal Haymarket
Theatre Royal Haymarket
(also known as Haymarket Theatre or the Little Theatre) is a West End theatre
West End theatre
in the Haymarket in the City of Westminster which dates back to 1720, making it the third-oldest London
London
playhouse still in use. Samuel Foote
Samuel Foote
acquired the lease in 1747, and in 1766 he gained a royal patent to play legitimate drama (meaning spoken drama, as opposed to opera, concerts or plays with music) in the summer months. The original building was a little further north in the same street. It has been at its current location since 1821, when it was redesigned by John Nash. It is a Grade I listed building, with a seating capacity of 888. The freehold of the theatre is owned by the Crown Estate.[1] The Haymarket
The Haymarket
has been the site of a significant innovation in theatre
[...More...]

"Theatre Royal, Haymarket" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

The Dragon Of Wantley
The Dragon of Wantley is a legend of a dragon-slaying by a knight on Wharncliffe Crags in South Yorkshire, recounted in a comic broadside ballad of 1685, later included in Thomas Percy's 1767 Reliques of Ancient English Poetry, and enjoying widespread popularity in the 18th and 19th centuries, although less well-known today. The ballad tells how the Falstaffian knight, Moore of Moore Hall, obtains a bespoke suit of spiked Sheffield armour and delivers a fatal kick to the dragon's "arse-gut," its only vulnerable spot - as the dragon explains with its dying breath
[...More...]

"The Dragon Of Wantley" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Theophilus Cibber
Theophilus Cibber
Theophilus Cibber
(25 or 26 November 1703[1] – October 1758) was an English actor, playwright, author, and son of the actor-manager Colley Cibber. He began acting at an early age, and followed his father into theatrical management. In 1727, Alexander Pope
Alexander Pope
satirized Theophilus Cibber in his Dunciad as a youth who "thrusts his person full into your face" (III 132). On the stage, he was famous for playing Pistol in Henry IV, Part 2, and some of the comic roles his father had played when younger, but unsympathetic critics accused him of overemphasis.[2] His private life later led Theophilus into bad reputation and scandal
[...More...]

"Theophilus Cibber" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Abraham Lincoln
President of the United StatesPresidencyFirst term1860 campaignElection1st inaugurationAddressAmerican Civil WarThe UnionEmancipation Proclamation Ten percent plan Gettysburg Address 13th AmendmentSecond term1864 campaignElection2nd inaugurationAddressReconstructionAssassination and legacyAssassination FuneralLegacy Memorials Depictions Views on slaveryTopical guide Bibliographyv t e Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Li

[...More...]

"Abraham Lincoln" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Robert William Elliston
Robert William Elliston
Robert William Elliston
(7 April 1774 – 7 July 1831) was an English actor and theatre manager. Life[edit] He was born in London, the son of a watchmaker. He was educated at St Paul's School, but ran away from home and made his first appearance on the stage as Tressel in Richard III at the Old Orchard Street Theatre in Bath in 1791.[1] There he was later seen as Romeo, and in other leading parts, both comic and tragic, and he repeated his successes in London
London
from 1796. In the same year he married Elizabeth, the sister of Mary Ann Rundall, and they would in time have ten children.[2] He acted at Drury Lane from 1804 to 1809, and again from 1812. From 1819 he was the lessee of the house, presenting Edmund Kean, Mme Vestris, and Macready. He bought the Olympic Theatre
Olympic Theatre
in 1813 and also had an interest in a patent theatre, the Theatre Royal, Birmingham
[...More...]

"Robert William Elliston" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Liston
John Liston
John Liston
(c. 1776 – 22 March 1846), English comedian, was born in London. He made his public debut on the stage at Weymouth as Lord Duberley in The Heir at Law. After several dismal failures in tragic parts, some of them in support of Mrs Siddons, he discovered accidentally that his forte was comedy, especially in the personation of old men and country boys, in which he displayed a fund of drollery and broad humour. An introduction to Charles Kemble
Charles Kemble
led to his appearance at the Haymarket on 10 June 1805 as Sheepface in the Village Lawyer, and his association with this theatre continued with few interruptions until 1830.Liston as Paul Pry, 1825.Paul Pry, the most famous of all his impersonations, was first presented on 13 September 1825 and soon became, thanks to his creative genius, a real personage
[...More...]

"John Liston" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Samuel Johnson (dramatist)
Samuel Johnson (1691–1773) was an English dancing-master and dramatist, known for his work Hurlothrumbo. Life[edit] Johnson was a native of Cheshire. In 1722 he gave a ball at Manchester, noted by John Byrom, and in 1724 he was in London with his fiddle. He worked to have staged his Hurlothrumbo, which he had shown to Byrom and other friends in Manchester
Manchester
in the previous year.[1] Hurlothrumbo was produced at the "little theatre in the Haymarket" early in April 1729, an epilogue by Byrom being added on the second night, while a prologue was contributed by Amos Meredith, another of the north-country wits in town. The whole circle attended and pledged themselves to applaud it from beginning to end. The piece ran for more than 30 nights, attracting crowded and fashionable audiences. They included the Duke of Montagu, who was credited with "the idea" of the piece
[...More...]

"Samuel Johnson (dramatist)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cheshire
Cheshire
Cheshire
(/ˈtʃɛʃər/ CHESH-ər, /-ɪər/ -eer;[2] archaically the County Palatine of Chester)[3] is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside
Merseyside
and Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the south and Flintshire, Wales
Wales
to the west. Cheshire's county town is Chester; the largest town is Warrington.[4] Other major towns include Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Macclesfield, Northwich, Runcorn, Widnes, Wilmslow, and Winsford.[5][6] The county covers 905 square miles (2,344 km2) and has a population of around 1 million
[...More...]

"Cheshire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Hurlothrumbo, Or The Supernatural
Hurlothrumbo is an 18th-century English nonsense play written by the dancing-master Samuel Johnson of Cheshire, and published in 1729. The spectacle incorporates both musical and spoken elements. Writing in 1855, Frederick Lawrence says of the play:[1]The extraordinary drama of Hurlothrumbo, above alluded to, was then (mirabiledictu!) the talk and admiration of the town. A more curious or a more insane production has seldom issued from human pen. — The Life of Henry Fielding, p. 21.The author himself performed as a principal in the play, with singing, dancing, playing fiddle, and walking on stilts
[...More...]

"Hurlothrumbo, Or The Supernatural" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Gay
John Gay
John Gay
(30 June 1685 – 4 December 1732) was an English poet and dramatist and member of the Scriblerus Club. He is best remembered for The Beggar's Opera
The Beggar's Opera
(1728), a ballad opera. The characters, including Captain Macheath
Captain Macheath
and Polly Peachum, became household names.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Early career 3 Patrons 4 The Beggar's Opera 5 Later career 6 Works 7 References in other works 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Gay was born in Barnstaple, England, and was educated at the town's grammar school. On leaving school he was apprenticed to a silk mercer in London, but being weary, according to Samuel Johnson, "of either the restraint or the servility of his occupation", he soon returned to Barnstaple, where he was educated by his uncle, the Rev. John Hanmer, the nonconformist minister of the town
[...More...]

"John Gay" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Beggar's Opera
The Beggar's Opera[1] is a ballad opera in three acts written in 1728 by John Gay
John Gay
with music arranged by Johann Christoph Pepusch. It is one of the watershed plays in Augustan drama
Augustan drama
and is the only example of the once thriving genre of satirical ballad opera to remain popular today. Ballad operas were satiric musical plays that used some of the conventions of opera, but without recitative
[...More...]

"The Beggar's Opera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Licensing Act 1737
The Licensing Act of 1737 was a pivotal moment in theatrical history. Its purpose was to control and censor what was being said about the British government through theatre. The act was modified by the Theatres Act 1843
Theatres Act 1843
and was finally named as the Theatres Act 1968.Contents1 Forerunner 2 Purpose of the Act 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksForerunner[edit] The function of censorship of plays for performance (at least in London) fell to the Master of the Revels by the time of the reign of Queen Elizabeth I. The power was used mostly with respect to matters of politics and religion (including blasphemy). It was certainly exercised by Edmund Tylney, who was Master from 1579 to 1610
[...More...]

"Licensing Act 1737" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Aaron Hill (writer)
Aaron Hill (10 February 1685 – 8 February 1750) was an English dramatist and miscellaneous writer. The son of a country gentleman of Wiltshire, Hill was educated at Westminster School, and afterwards travelled in the East. He was the author of 17 plays, some of them, such as his versions of Voltaire's Zaire and Mérope (fr), being adaptations. He also wrote poetry, which is of variable quality. Having written some satiric lines on Alexander Pope, he received in return a mention in The Dunciad, which led to a controversy between the two writers. Afterwards a reconciliation took place. He was a friend and correspondent of Samuel Richardson, whose Pamela he highly praised
[...More...]

"Aaron Hill (writer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Henry Fielding
Henry Fielding
Henry Fielding
(22 April 1707 – 8 October 1754) was an English novelist and dramatist known for his rich, earthy humour and satirical prowess, and as the author of the picaresque novel Tom Jones. Additionally, he holds a significant place in the history of law enforcement, having used his authority as a magistrate to found (with his half-brother John) what some have called London's first police force, the Bow Street Runners. His younger sister, Sarah, also became a successful writer.[1]Contents1 Dramatist and novelist 2 Marriages 3 Jurist and magistrate 4 Partial list of works 5 References 6 External linksDramatist and novelist[edit] Fielding was born at Sharpham, Somerset, and educated at Eton College, where he established a lifelong friendship with William Pitt the Elder.[2] When Henry was 11, his mother died. A suit for custody was brought by his grandmother against his charming but irresponsible father, Lt. Gen. Edmund Fielding
[...More...]

"Henry Fielding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Sleeper Clarke
John Sleeper Clarke
John Sleeper Clarke
(September 3, 1833 – September 24, 1899) was a 19th-century American comedian and actor.Contents1 Life 2 Publications 3 References 4 See alsoLife[edit] He was born in [[Baltimore, Maryland] to George W. Sleeper and Georgianna Sleeper born: Clerke], and was educated for the law. In his boyhood he was a schoolmate of Edwin Booth
Edwin Booth
who was born in the same year as he, and with whom he engaged in amateur dramatic readings as members of the Baltimore Thespian Club.[1][2] He made his first appearance in Boston
Boston
as Frank Hardy in Paul Pry in 1851, at the Howard Athenæum.[3] The next year he went to Philadelphia
[...More...]

"John Sleeper Clarke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Rich (producer)
John Rich (1692–1761) was an important director and theatre manager in 18th-century London. He opened the New Theatre at Lincoln's Inn Fields (1714), which he managed until he opened the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden
Covent Garden
(1732). He managed Covent Garden
Covent Garden
until 1761, putting on ever more lavish productions. He introduced pantomime to the English stage and played a dancing and mute Harlequin
Harlequin
himself from 1717 to 1760 under the stage name of "Lun."[1][2] Rich's version of the servant character, Arlecchino, moved away from the poor, disheveled, loud, and crude character, to a colorfully-dressed, silent Harlequin, performing fanciful tricks, dances and magic.[3] The British idea of the Harlequin
Harlequin
character was heavily inspired by Rich’s idea of a silent character
[...More...]

"John Rich (producer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.