HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Theatre 625
Theatre 625 is a British television
British television
drama anthology series, produced by the BBC
BBC
and transmitted on BBC2 from 1964 to 1968
[...More...]

"Theatre 625" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

British Television
Television in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
started in 1936 as a public service which was free of advertising. Currently, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
has a collection of free-to-air, free-to-view and subscription services over a variety of distribution media, through which there are over 480 channels[nb 1] for consumers as well as on-demand content. There are six main channel owners who are responsible for most viewing. There are 27,000 hours of domestic content produced a year at a cost of £2.6 billion.[nb 2] Since 24 October 2012, all television broadcasts in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
are in a digital format, following the end of analogue transmissions in Northern Ireland
[...More...]

"British Television" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Jerome Kilty
Jerome Timothy Kilty (born June 24, 1922 – died September 6, 2012[1]) was an American actor and playwright. He wrote Dear Liar: A Comedy of Letters, a play that had a successful run in New York, which was based on the correspondence of famed playwright George Bernard Shaw and actress Mrs. Patrick Campbell
[...More...]

"Jerome Kilty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Timothy West
Timothy Lancaster West,[1] CBE (born 20 October 1934) is an English film, stage and television actor, with more than fifty years of varied work in the business. As well as many classical theatre performances, he has appeared frequently on television, including spells in both Coronation Street
Coronation Street
and EastEnders
[...More...]

"Timothy West" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Patrick Allen
Patrick
Patrick
may refer to:Saint PatrickSt
[...More...]

"Patrick Allen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Suzanne Neve
Suzanne Neve (born 6 September 1939) is an English actress who appeared regularly on British television during the 1960s, including the lead role of Isabel Archer in the BBC's 1968 adaptation of Henry James's The Portrait of a Lady. Neve first came to public attention as Ethel Brown in a 1962 series based on the William books of Richmal Crompton. She subsequently had leading roles in Smuggler's Bay (1964) and as Fleur de Lys in a dramatisation of The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1966). Her big break came with the BBC's flagship production of The Forsyte Saga (1967), in which she played Holly.[1] Following Portrait of a Lady, Neve continued to appear in television dramas, including further adaptations of the classics, such as Bel-Ami (1971). She also had a recurring role as Mary, the wife of Commander Straker in the science fiction series UFO (1970–71).[2] Neve appeared in several films including Play It Cool (1962), Naked Evil (1966), Mosquito Squadron (1969) and Scrooge (1970)
[...More...]

"Suzanne Neve" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Robinson (English Actor)
John Robinson (11 November, 1908 – 6 March, 1979[1]) was an English actor, who was particularly active in the theatre.[2] Mostly cast in minor and supporting roles in film and television, he is best remembered for being the second actor to play the famous television science-fiction role of Professor Bernard Quatermass, in the 1955 BBC Television serial Quatermass II.Contents1 Biography 2 Partial filmography 3 Footnotes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Robinson was born in Liverpool, Lancashire, England.[2] His first professional appearance came in his home city in 1929, at the Liverpool Playhouse.[2] He appeared in a variety of stage productions in London throughout the 1930s
[...More...]

"John Robinson (English Actor)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Peter Welch (actor)
Peter Welch (30 March 1922 – 20 November 1984) was a British actor who appeared in television programmes including Dixon of Dock Green, Z-Cars, Spy Trap, Softly, Softly, Doctor Who[1] and Danger Man with Patrick McGoohan.[2][3] He spent several years touring in the theatre with a repertory company he founded, and began playing character parts in films from the mid 1950s.[4] Filmography[edit]Dial 999 (1955) The Long Arm (1956) Five Clues to Fortune (1957) The Admirable Crichton (1957) The Silent Enemy (1958) The House of the Seven Hawks (1959) The Secret Partner (1961) A Prize of Arms (1962) Calculated Risk (1963) The Secret of Blood Island (1964)External links[edit]Peter Welch on IMDbReferences[edit]^ "Doctor Who Guide: Peter Welch". Doctor Who Guide.  ^ "Peter Welch". BFI.  ^ "Peter Welch".  ^ "Peter Welch movies, photos, movie reviews, filmography, and biography - AllMovie"
[...More...]

"Peter Welch (actor)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vernon Dobtcheff
Vernon Dobtcheff (born 14 August 1934) is a French actor. Dobtcheff was born in Nîmes, France, to a family of Russian descent.[1] He attended Ascham Preparatory School in Eastbourne, Sussex, England, in the 1940s, where he won the Acting Cup. One of his many television roles was as the Chief Scientist in the Doctor Who series The War Games in 1969, in which he became the first actor ever to mention the Time Lords by name. He also appeared in the Blake's 7 episode "Shadow" as the Chairman of the Terra Nostra in 1979
[...More...]

"Vernon Dobtcheff" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sylvia Kay
Sylvia Kay (born 1936 in Altrincham, Cheshire) is an English character actress who has had many roles in British television programmes, most notably as Daphne Warrender in the BBC sitcom Just Good Friends. Early life[edit] She attended Roundhay High School for Girls in Leeds. Career[edit] She has also appeared in films such as That Kind of Girl (1963), Rapture (1965), Wake in Fright (1971, directed by her then-husband Ted Kotcheff) and Coming Out of the Ice (1982), and the television dramas Dalziel and Pascoe, Shelley, Z-Cars, Minder, Jeeves and Wooster and The Professionals. External links[edit]
[...More...]

"Sylvia Kay" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Welsh (actor)
John Welsh (7 November 1914 in Wexford
Wexford
– 21 April 1985 in London) was an Irish actor.[2][3]Contents1 Biography 2 Filmography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] After an early stage career in Dublin, Welsh moved into British film and television in the 1950s.[1] His roles included James Forsyte in the 1967 BBC
BBC
dramatisation of John Galsworthy's The Forsyte Saga, as well as the butler Merriman in The Duchess of Duke Street, Sgt. Cuff in The Moonstone and a brief scene as the barber in Brideshead Revisited.[4] He also appeared in Hancock's Half Hour, The Brothers, Prince Regent, To Serve Them All My Days and The Citadel, and played the assistant chief constable in the early series of Softly, Softly.[2] Welsh also appeared in a number of different roles on Danger Man
Danger Man
that included British diplomats and butlers.[5] Filmography[edit]The Accused (1953) - Mr
[...More...]

"John Welsh (actor)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Edward Brayshaw
Edward Brayshaw (18 October 1933 – 28 December 1990[1]) was a British actor. His television roles include the part of Rochefort in the 1966 serial The Three Musketeers and 1967's The Further Adventures of the Three Musketeers. He is probably most recognised for playing Harold Meaker in the children's series Rentaghost, throughout its 8-year run on BBC1. He often appeared in TV adventure series, taking roles in several ITC series including The Saint, The Baron (in two episodes but in different roles), The Champions and Return of the Saint, often in swarthy, villainous roles. In The Champions, for example, he played a mob boss. He appeared twice in Doctor Who: first as Léon Colbert in 1964's The Reign of Terror, and second as the War Chief, one of the main villains in the 1969 serial The War Games. He appeared in the 1969 Avengers episode "Homicide and Old Lace", which had been re-edited from an unfinished story entitled "The Great, Great Britain Crime"
[...More...]

"Edward Brayshaw" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Naomi Capon
Naomi Capon (née Mattuck; 17 December 1921 – 10 February 1987) was a British television director. Capon was born in Amersham, Buckinghamshire[1] and was one of the earliest female drama directors to work in British television. She started working in television in 1941 in the USA, before joining the BBC North American service in 1947. Her credits include the award-winning BBC classic serial The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970). She directed three episodes of the BBC science-fiction anthology series Out of the Unknown. She also worked as a producer, including on the BBC series The Appleyards, which she also directed.[2] Im 1946, she married Charles Kenneth Capon, who died in 1988.[3][4] Her last known television credit dates from 1973. She died in Kensington in 1987.[5] References[edit]^ England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1916-2005 ^ "Appleyards, The (1952-57, 1960)". Screenonline
[...More...]

"Naomi Capon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

BBC
The British Broadcasting
Broadcasting
Corporation (BBC) is a British public service broadcaster. Its headquarters are at Broadcasting House
Broadcasting House
in Westminster, London
London
and it is the world's oldest national broadcasting organisation[3] and the largest broadcaster in the world by number of employees
[...More...]

"BBC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hugh Burden
Hugh Archibald Nairn Burden[1] (3 April 1913 – 17 May 1985) was an English actor and playwright. Burden was the son of a colonial official and was educated at Beaumont College and trained at the Central School of Speech and Drama and RADA. He then appeared on stage in repertory theatre in Croydon and in London's West End before military service in the Hampshire Regiment and the Indian Army from 1939 to 1942. Burden made appearances in numerous UK television plays and series including Doctor Who: Spearhead from Space (1970), The Crezz (1976), Sykes (1979), Strange Report (1968) and The Avengers (1963). He played the title role in The Mind of Mr. J. G. Reeder (1969)
[...More...]

"Hugh Burden" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tim Preece
Tim Preece (born 5 August 1938) is an English actor, prominent in 1970s television. Preece was born in Shrewsbury, Shropshire. He played Tom Patterson in the first two series of The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1976–77) and The Legacy Of Reginald Perrin (1996) and also had a role in the Doctor Who
Doctor Who
serial "Planet of the Daleks" (1973). He later appeared as the editor of a local newspaper in 'The Journalist' an episode of People Like Us (2001) with Chris Langham. Preece played the recurring role of Rev
[...More...]

"Tim Preece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.