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The Wicked World
The Wicked World
The Wicked World
is a blank verse play by W. S. Gilbert
W. S. Gilbert
in three acts. It opened at the Haymarket Theatre
Haymarket Theatre
on 4 January 1873 and ran for a successful 145 performances, closing on 21 June 1873.[1] The play is an allegory loosely based on a short illustrated story of the same title by Gilbert, written in 1871 and published in Tom Hood's Comic Annual, about how pure fairies cope with a sudden introduction to them of "mortal love." Set in "Fairy Land", the action occurs within the space of 24 hours. Gilbert envisioned the set as resembling John Martin's 1853 painting The Plains of Heaven: vaporous mountains and headlands around ethereal blue and a flowering slope on which sit white-clad angels
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The Yeomen Of The Guard
The Yeomen of the Guard; or, The Merryman and His Maid, is a Savoy Opera, with music by Arthur Sullivan
Arthur Sullivan
and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. It premiered at the Savoy Theatre
Savoy Theatre
on 3 October 1888, and ran for 423 performances. This was the eleventh collaboration of fourteen between Gilbert and Sullivan. The opera is set in the Tower of London, during the 16th century, and is the darkest, and perhaps most emotionally engaging, of the Savoy Operas, ending with a broken-hearted main character and two very reluctant engagements, rather than the usual numerous marriages. The libretto does contain considerable humour, including a lot of pun-laden one-liners, but Gilbert's trademark satire and topsy-turvy plot complications are subdued in comparison with the other Gilbert and Sullivan operas
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Thomas William Robertson
Thomas William Robertson (9 January 1829 – 3 February 1871), usually known professionally as T. W. Robertson, was an English dramatist and innovative stage director best known for a series of realistic or naturalistic plays produced in London
London
in the 1860s that broke new ground and inspired playwrights such as W.S. Gilbert
W.S. Gilbert
and George Bernard Shaw.Contents1 Life and career1.1 Plays 1.2 Innovations in realism and directing2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Born in Newark-upon-Trent, Nottinghamshire, England, Robertson was the oldest son of William Robertson, a provincial actor and manager. His family was famous for producing actors. The actress Margaret (Madge) Robertson was his youngest sister. As a child, Robertson acted in juvenile parts in Rob Roy, Pizarro, The Stranger, "French" parts and eccentric comedy on the Lincoln Circuit and at the Marylebone in London
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Comic Opera
Comic opera denotes a sung dramatic work of a light or comic nature, usually with a happy ending. Forms of comic opera first developed in late 17th-century Italy. By the 1730s, a new operatic genre, opera buffa, emerged as an alternative to opera seria. It quickly made its way to France, where it became opéra bouffon, and eventually, in the following century, French operetta, with Jacques Offenbach
Jacques Offenbach
as its most accomplished practitioner. The influence of the Italian and French forms spread to other parts of Europe. Many countries developed their own genres of comic opera, incorporating the Italian and French models along with their own musical traditions
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Thespis (opera)
Thespis, or The Gods Grown Old, is an operatic extravaganza that was the first collaboration between dramatist W. S. Gilbert
W. S. Gilbert
and composer Arthur Sullivan. No musical score of Thespis
Thespis
was ever published, and most of the music has been lost. Gilbert and Sullivan
Gilbert and Sullivan
went on to become the most famous and successful artistic partnership in Victorian England, creating a string of comic opera hits, including H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance
The Pirates of Penzance
and The Mikado, which continue to be popular. Thespis
Thespis
premièred in London at the Gaiety Theatre on 26 December 1871. Like many productions at that theatre, it was written in a broad, burlesque style, considerably different from Gilbert and Sullivan's later works
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Victorian Burlesque
Victorian burlesque, sometimes known as travesty or extravaganza,[1] is a genre of theatrical entertainment that was popular in Victorian England and in the New York theatre of the mid 19th century. It is a form of parody in which a well-known opera or piece of classical theatre or ballet is adapted into a broad comic play, usually a musical play, usually risqué in style, mocking the theatrical and musical conventions and styles of the original work, and often quoting or pastiching text or music from the original work. Victorian burlesque is one of several forms of burlesque. Like ballad opera, burlesques featured musical scores drawing on a wide range of music, from popular contemporary songs to operatic arias, although later burlesques, from the 1880s, sometimes featured original scores. Dance played an important part, and great attention was paid to the staging, costumes and other spectacular elements of stagecraft, as many of the pieces were staged as extravaganzas
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German Reed Entertainment
The German Reed Entertainments
German Reed Entertainments
were founded in 1855 and operated by Thomas German Reed
Thomas German Reed
(1817–1888) together with his wife, Priscilla German Reed (née Horton) (1818–1895). At a time when the theatre in London was seen as a disreputable place, the German Reed family provided family-friendly entertainments for forty years, showing that respectable theatre could be popular. The entertainments were held at the intimate Royal Gallery of Illustration, Lower Regent Street, and later at St. George's Hall, Langham Place, in London. Thomas and Priscilla German Reed
Priscilla German Reed
usually appeared in them, together with a small group of players. They engaged talented newcomers, such as Frederic Clay, W. S. Gilbert
W. S. Gilbert
and Arthur Law, as well as established writers like F. C. Burnand, to create many of the entertainments
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The Illustrated London News
The Illustrated
Illustrated
London News appeared first on Saturday 14 May 1842, as the world's first illustrated weekly news magazine.[1] Founded by Herbert Ingram, it appeared weekly until 1971, then less frequently thereafter, and ceased publication in 2003. The company continues today as Illustrated
Illustrated
London News Ltd, a publishing, content and digital agency in London, which holds the publication and business archives of the magazine.Contents1 History1.1 1842–60: Herbert Ingram 1.2 1860–1900: William and Charles Ingram 1.3 1900–63: Bruce Ingram 1.4 1963–present2 Collaborators 3 Chief editors 4 Archive 5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 Bibliography 8 External linksHistory[edit] 1842–60: Herbert Ingram[edit]Front cover of 1 October 1892 issue, showing a scene from Sydney Grundy and Arthur Sullivan's Haddon Hall created by M
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Madame De Genlis
Stéphanie Félicité du Crest de Saint-Aubin, Comtesse de Genlis (25 January 1746 – 31 December 1830), known as Madame de Genlis, was a French writer, harpist and educator, [1], Governess of the Children of France.Contents1 Life 2 Reception history2.1 Britain3 In literature 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Sources 7 Bibliography 8 External linksLife[edit] Félicité de Genlis was born at the château of Champcéry in Issy-l'Évêque, Saône-et-Loire, of a noble but impoverished Burgundian family. At six years old she was received as a canoness into the noble chapter of Alix near Lyon, with the title of Madame la Comtesse de Lancy, taken from the town of Bourbon-Lancy. Her entire education was conducted at home.[2]Madame de Genlis, portrait by Jacques-Antoine-Marie LemoineIn 1758, in Paris, her skill as a harpist and her vivacious wit speedily attracted admiration
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James Planché
James Robinson Planché (27 February 1796 – 30 May 1880) was a British dramatist, antiquary and officer of arms. Over a period of approximately 60 years he wrote, adapted, or collaborated on 176 plays in a wide range of genres including extravaganza, farce, comedy, burletta, melodrama and opera. Planché was responsible for introducing historically accurate costume into nineteenth century British theatre, and subsequently became an acknowledged expert on historical costume, publishing a number of works on the topic. Planché's interest in historical costume led to other antiquarian research, including heraldry and genealogy
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The Palace Of Truth
A palace is a grand residence, especially a royal residence, or the home of a head of state or some other high-ranking dignitary, such as a bishop or archbishop.[1] The word is derived from the Latin
Latin
name Palātium, for Palatine Hill in Rome
Rome
which housed the Imperial residences.[1] In many parts of Europe, the term is also applied to ambitious private mansions of the aristocracy. Many historic palaces are now put to other uses such as parliaments, museums, hotels, or office buildings
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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The Plains Of Heaven (painting)
The Last Judgement is a triptych of oil paintings by the British artist John Martin, created in 1851–4. The work comprises three separate paintings on a theme of the end of the world, inspired by the Book of Revelation. The paintings are generally considered to be among Martin's most important works, and have been described by some art critics as his masterpiece. The paintings were Martin's last major works before his death in 1854. They were exhibited to the public from the time of his death until the 1870s to advertise the sale of prints from engravings of the works, being displayed in galleries and exhibition halls all over the UK, in New York in 1856–7 and in Australia in 1878–9. It has been claimed that up to eight million people viewed the paintings during their extensive tours. Martin's style of didactic expository art was rarely praised by art critics but remained popular with the public until the 1860s
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John Martin (painter)
John Martin (19 July 1789 – 17 February 1854)[1] was an English Romantic painter, engraver and illustrator. He was celebrated for his typically vast and melodramatic paintings of religious subjects and fantastic compositions, populated with minute figures placed in imposing landscapes. Martin's paintings, and the engravings made from them, enjoyed great success with the general public—in 1821 Lawrence referred to him as "the most popular painter of his day"—but were lambasted by Ruskin and other critics.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Beginnings as artist 3 Painter of repute 4 Later life 5 Legacy 6 Paintings 7 Engravings 8 Family8.1 Wife and children 8.2 Martin's brothers9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksEarly life[edit] Martin was born in July 1789, in a one-room cottage,[3] at Haydon Bridge, near Hexham
Hexham
in Northumberland, the fourth son of Fenwick Martin, a one-time fencing master
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Tom Hood
Tom Hood
Tom Hood
(19 January 1835 – 20 November 1874), was an English humorist and playwright, and son of the poet and author Thomas Hood. A prolific author, in 1865 he was appointed editor of the magazine Fun. He founded Tom Hood's Comic Annual in 1867.Contents1 Biography 2 Controversy over Alice in Wonderland 3 Legacy and honours 4 Notes 5 External linksBiography[edit] Tom Hood
Tom Hood
in caricature by Frederick Waddy (1872)Hood was born at Lake House, Leytonstone, England, the son of the poet Thomas Hood
Thomas Hood
and his wife. After attending University College School and Louth Grammar School, he entered Pembroke College, Oxford, in 1853. There he studied for the Church and passed all the examinations for the degree of BA, but did not graduate. At Oxford he wrote his Farewell to the Swallows (1853) and Pen and Pencil Pictures (1854)
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Blank Verse
Blank verse
Blank verse
is poetry written with regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always in iambic pentameter.[1] It has been described as "probably the most common and influential form that English poetry has taken since the 16th century",[2] and Paul Fussell
Paul Fussell
has estimated that "about three quarters of all English poetry is in blank verse".[3] The first documented use of blank verse in the English language was by Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey
in his translation of the Æneid (composed c. 1540; published 1554–1557[4])
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