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The Vort
Lobster Random
Lobster Random
is a character in the comic book 2000 AD. He was created by Simon Spurrier
Simon Spurrier
and artist Carl Critchlow.Contents1 Overview1.1 "The Vort" and subsequently series2 Bibliography 3 ReferencesOverview[edit] Ugly of temper and with a pair of claws surgically grafted onto his sides, Lobster Random
Lobster Random
was a genetically modified soldier, adapted to never need sleep or to feel pain. After being discharged from the military he found his talents lay in the art of torture, and hired out his services for any client who required information and wasn't squeamish about the methods employed to get it. "Lob" is a cranky old bald man with two huge lobster claws emerging from his back, and is part of a long tradition in 2000 AD giving their protagonists a distinctive visual appearance at odds with the comic book stereotype of square-jawed, good-looking action heroes
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Rebellion Developments
Rebellion Developments
Rebellion Developments
Limited is an English video game developer based in Oxford, England, known for its Sniper Elite
Sniper Elite
series and multiple games in the Alien vs. Predator
Alien vs. Predator
series
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First Appearance
In American comic books and other stories with a long history, first appearance refers to the first issue to feature a fictional character. These issues are often highly valued by collectors due to their rarity and iconic status.Contents1 Monetary value of first appearance issues 2 Reader interest in first appearances 3 Ambiguity of first appearance 4 First appearances of popular heroes, villains and teams 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesMonetary value of first appearance issues[edit] First appearances of popular characters are among the most valuable comic books in existence
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2000 AD (comics)
2000 AD is a weekly British science fiction-orientated comic magazine. As a comics anthology it serialises stories in each issue (known as "progs")[note 1] and was first published by IPC Magazines in 1977, the first issue dated 26 February. IPC then shifted the title to its Fleetway comics subsidiary which was sold to Robert Maxwell
Robert Maxwell
in 1987 then Egmont UK
Egmont UK
in 1991. Fleetway continued to produce the title until 2000, when it was bought by Rebellion Developments. 2000 AD is most noted for its Judge Dredd
Judge Dredd
stories, and has been contributed to by a number of artists and writers who became renowned in the field internationally, such as Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Grant Morrison, Brian Bolland
Brian Bolland
and Mike McMahon
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Carl Critchlow
Carl Critchlow
Carl Critchlow
(born 1963) is a British fantasy and science fiction comic illustrator. He is best known for his character Thrud the Barbarian, which originally appeared in White Dwarf magazine, and for his work for the Lobster Random
Lobster Random
comics.Contents1 Career 2 Style and reception 3 Bibliography3.1 Comics 3.2 Role-playing games4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] Critchlow's comic book career began in the early 1980s, when he contributed to fanzines and informal publications.[1] His professional career began in 1983 when his work was published in Issue 45 of Games Workshop's White Dwarf magazine,[2] where Critchlow first portrayed his fantasy barbarian character, Thrud the Barbarian, in a regular, page-long, black and white, ink-drawn strip of the same name
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Fictional Character
A character (sometimes known as a fictional character) is a person or other being in a narrative (such as a novel, play, television series, film, or video game).[1][2][3] The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made.[2] Derived from the ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration,[4] although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones in 1749.[5][6] From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed.[6] Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person."[7] In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes.[8] Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor.[6] Since the 19th century, the art of creating cha
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2005 In Comics
Notable events of 2005
2005
in comics. See also List of years in comics.Contents1 Events1.1 January 1.2 April 1.3 May 1.4 June 1.5 July 1.6 August 1.7 September 1.8 October 1.9 November 1.10 December2 Deaths2.1 January 2.2 April 2.3 May 2.4 June 2.5 July 2.6 August 2.7 September 2.8 October 2.9 November 2.10 December3 Exhibitions and shows 4 First issues by title 5 Conventions 6 Footnotes 7 ReferencesEvents[edit] January[edit]January 31: John R. Norton begins the George comic stripApril[edit]April 13: DC Comics
DC Comics
announces the discontinuation of its Humanoids and 2000 AD titles. Powerade
Powerade
and DC Comics
DC Comics
show the first of four new online comics (at http://www.flava23.com) starring LeBron James
LeBron James
as superhero "King James"
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Pseudonym
A pseudonym (/ˈsjuːdənɪm/ or /ˈsuːdənɪm/ SEW-də-nim) or alias is a name that a person or group assumes for a particular purpose, which can differ from their original or true name (orthonym).[1] Pseudonyms include stage names and user names (both called screen names), ring names, pen names, nicknames, aliases, superhero or villain identities and code names, gamer identifications, and regnal names of emperors, popes, and other monarchs. Historically, they have often taken the form of anagrams, Graecisms, and Latinisations, although there are many other methods of choosing a pseudonym.[2] Pseudonyms should not be confused with new names that replace old ones and become the individual's full-time name. Pseudonyms are "part-time" names, used only in certain contexts – usually adopted to hide an individual's real identity, as with writers' pen names, graffiti artists' tags, resistance fighters' or terrorists' noms de guerre, and computer hackers' handles
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Trade Paperback (comics)
In comics, a trade paperback (often shortened to trade) is a collection of stories originally published in comic books, reprinted in book format, usually capturing one story arc from a single title or a series of stories with a connected story arc or common theme. Traditionally, a trade paperback will reproduce the stories at the same size as they were originally presented in comic book format. However, certain trades have been published in a smaller, "digest-sized" format, similar in size to a paperback novel. Other works (usually material likely to sell well) are published in a larger-than-original hardcover format. Many comics collections are published in hardcover (or in both formats). The bulk of this article applies to both paperback and hardcover collections
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Simon Spurrier
Simon "Si" Spurrier[1] is a British comics writer and novelist, who has previously worked as a cook, a bookseller, and an art director for the BBC. Getting his start in comics with the British small press, he went on to write his own series for 2000 AD, like Lobster Random, Bec & Kawl, The Simping Detective and Harry Kipling, as well as a number of stories for the flagship character Judge Dredd. In recent years he has broken into the American comic book
American comic book
industry, writing mainly for Marvel Comics
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G. Powell
Simon "Si" Spurrier[1] is a British comics writer and novelist, who has previously worked as a cook, a bookseller, and an art director for the BBC. Getting his start in comics with the British small press, he went on to write his own series for 2000 AD, like Lobster Random, Bec & Kawl, The Simping Detective and Harry Kipling, as well as a number of stories for the flagship character Judge Dredd. In recent years he has broken into the American comic book industry, writing mainly for Marvel Comics
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D'Israeli (cartoonist)
Matt Brooker, whose work most often appears under the pseudonym D'Israeli (sometimes D'Israeli D'Emon D'Raughtsman), is a British comic artist, colorist, writer and letterer. Other pseudonyms he uses include "Molly Eyre" (a pun on Molière), for his writing, and "Harry V. Derci"/"Digital Derci" for his lettering work.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 Awards 4 Notes 5 References 6 External links6.1 InterviewsBiography[edit] In 1988 he worked as the penciller on issues 7 to 12 of Mister X (volume two). His early work also includes the surreal Timulo, which appeared in Deadline magazine
Deadline magazine
in 1989. Also in Deadline, he co-created Fatal Charm with Shane Oakley
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Lobster Random
Lobster Random
Lobster Random
is a character in the comic book 2000 AD. He was created by Simon Spurrier
Simon Spurrier
and artist Carl Critchlow.Contents1 Overview1.1 "The Vort" and subsequently series2 Bibliography 3 ReferencesOverview[edit] Ugly of temper and with a pair of claws surgically grafted onto his sides, Lobster Random
Lobster Random
was a genetically modified soldier, adapted to never need sleep or to feel pain. After being discharged from the military he found his talents lay in the art of torture, and hired out his services for any client who required information and wasn't squeamish about the methods employed to get it. "Lob" is a cranky old bald man with two huge lobster claws emerging from his back, and is part of a long tradition in 2000 AD giving their protagonists a distinctive visual appearance at odds with the comic book stereotype of square-jawed, good-looking action heroes
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