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The Village Voice
Coordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′28″W / 40.7283°N 73.9911°W / 40.7283; -73.9911The Village VoiceType Alternative weeklyFormat TabloidOwner(s) Peter BarbeyFounder(s) Ed Fancher Dan Wolf John Wilcock Norman MailerEditor-in-chief Stephen MooallemFounded October 26, 1955; 62 years ago (1955-10-26)Headquarters 80 Maiden Lane New York, NY 10038 U.S.[1]Circulation 120,000 (2016)ISSN 0042-6180Website villagevoice.comThe Cooper Square former head office of the paperVillage Voice columnist Nat Hentoff; photo by Tom Pich The Village Voice
The Village Voice
is an American news and culture paper, known for being the country's first alternative newsweekly. Founded in 1955 by Dan Wolf, Ed Fancher and Norman Mailer, the Voice began as a platform for the creative community of New York City. Since its founding, The Village Voice has received three Pulitzer Prizes, the National Press Foundation Award and the George Polk Award
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La Vie Boheme
"La Vie Bohème" (French: The Bohemian Life) is a song, which is broken into two parts (" La Vie Bohème A" and " La Vie Bohème B"), in the musical Rent. The song is a celebration of bohemianism, especially the type present in the 1980s Alphabet City, Manhattan, and begins with a mocking of the character Benny's statement that "Bohemia is dead".[1] In between the two halves of the song is an interlude featuring a romantic duet with Roger and Mimi ("I Should Tell You"), during which they each learn that the other is HIV+ and tentatively decide to begin a relationship together. In the stage musical, the second part of this song opens with a brief dialogue between Maureen and Joanne in which Joanne tells of the riot in the lot. The song then continues with the celebration of bohemianism from the first part of the song. Like the first part, the second part of La Vie Bohème lists many ideas, trends, and other symbols of bohemianism
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Digital Media
Digital media
Digital media
are any media that are encoded in machine-readable formats.[1] Digital media
Digital media
can be created, viewed, distributed, modified and preserved on digital electronics devices.Contents1 Digital Media 2 History2.1 Digital computers 2.2 "As We May Think"3 Impact3.1 The digital revolution 3.2 Disruption in industry 3.3 Individual as content creator 3.4 Web only news 3.5 Copyright
Copyright
challenges4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingDigital Media[edit] Examples of digital media include software, digital images, digital video, video game, web pages and websites, including social media, data and databases, digital audio, such as MP3 and electronic books. Digital media
Digital media
often contrasts with print media, such as printed books, newspapers and magazines, and other traditional or analog media, such as images, movies or audio tapes
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Stonewall Inn
The Stonewall Inn, often shortened to Stonewall, is a gay bar and recreational tavern in the Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
neighborhood of Lower Manhattan, New York City, and the site of the Stonewall riots
Stonewall riots
of 1969, which is widely considered to be the single most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for gay and lesbian rights in the United States.[2] The original Inn, which closed in 1969, was located at 51–53 Christopher Street, between West 4th Street and Waverly Place.[4] The Stonewall reopened in 1972 under the same management at 211 22nd Street in Miami Beach
Miami Beach
but burned down 2 years later.[5][6] In 1990 a bar called "Stonewall" opened in the western half of the original Manhattan
Manhattan
location (53 Christopher Street). This was renovated and returned to its original name, "The Stonewall Inn", in 2007
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Financial District (Manhattan)
Coordinates: 40°42′27″N 74°00′40″W / 40.707499°N 74.011153°W / 40.707499; -74.011153Financial DistrictNeighborhood in ManhattanThe Financial District of Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan
viewed from New York Harbor, near the Statue of Liberty, October 2013Country United StatesState New YorkCity New York CityBorough ManhattanPopulation (2010) • Total 60,976The Financial District, also known as FiDi,[1] is a neighborhood located at the southern tip of the borough of Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City, which comprises the offices and headquarters of many of the city's major financial institutions, including the New York Stock Exchange and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York
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Lynda Barry
Lynda Barry
Lynda Barry
(born Linda Jean Barry; January 2, 1956) is an American cartoonist, author, and teacher. Barry is best known for her weekly comic strip Ernie Pook's Comeek. She garnered attention with her 1988 illustrated novel The Good Times are Killing Me, about an interracial friendship between two young girls, which was adapted into a play. Her second illustrated novel, Cruddy, first appeared in 1999
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Ezra Pound
Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (30 October 1885 – 1 November 1972) was an expatriate American poet and critic, as well as a major figure in the early modernist movement. His contribution to poetry began with his development of Imagism, a movement derived from classical Chinese and Japanese poetry, stressing clarity, precision and economy of language. His works include Ripostes
Ripostes
(1912), Hugh Selwyn Mauberley (1920) and the unfinished 120-section epic, The Cantos
The Cantos
(1917–1969). Pound worked in London during the early 20th century as foreign editor of several American literary magazines, and helped discover and shape the work of contemporaries such as T. S. Eliot, James Joyce, Robert Frost and Ernest Hemingway.[a] Angered by the carnage of World War I, Pound lost faith in Great Britain
Great Britain
and blamed the war on usury and international capitalism
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George Polk Award
The George Polk
George Polk
Awards in Journalism are a series of prestigious[1][2][3] American journalism awards presented annually by Long Island University
Long Island University
in New York in the United States. A writer for Idea Lab, a group blog hosted on the website of PBS, described the award as "one of only a couple of journalism prizes that means anything".[4] The awards were established in 1949 in memory of George Polk, a CBS correspondent who was murdered in 1948 while covering the Greek Civil War (1946–49)
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National Press Foundation
The National Press Foundation (NPF) is an American journalism organization focused on educational programs for journalists and issuing awards for accomplishment. All programs are free for accepted fellows with expenses covered; all awards carry cash awards
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Pulitzer Prize
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
/ˈpʊlɪtsər/[1] is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature, and musical composition in the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of American (Hungarian-born) Joseph Pulitzer who had made his fortune as a newspaper publisher, and is administered by Columbia University
Columbia University
in New York City.[2] Prizes are awarded yearly in twenty-one categories. In twenty of the categories, each winner receives a certificate and a U.S
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Newsweekly
A news magazine is a typed, printed, and published piece of paper, magazine or a radio or television program, usually weekly, consisting of articles about current events. News
News
magazines generally discuss stories, in greater depth than do newspapers or newscasts, and aim to give the consumer an understanding of the important events beyond the basic facts.Contents1 Broadcast news magazines 2 Notable print news magazines 3 Notable TV news magazines3.1 Australia 3.2 United States 3.3 Canada 3.4 Italy 3.5 United Kingdom 3.6 Other countries4 Notable radio news magazines4.1 International 4.2 Australia 4.3 United Kingdom 4.4 United States 4.5 Canada5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBroadcast news magazines[edit] Radio
Radio
news magazines are similar to television news magazines
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Newspaper Circulation
A newspaper's circulation is the number of copies it distributes on an average day. Circulation is one of the principal factors used to set advertising rates. Circulation is not always the same as copies sold, often called paid circulation, since some newspapers are distributed without cost to the reader. Readership figures are usually higher than circulation figures because of the assumption that a typical copy of the newspaper is read by more than one person. In many countries, circulations are audited by independent bodies such as the Audit
Audit
Bureau of Circulations to assure advertisers that a given newspaper does indeed reach the number of people claimed by the publisher
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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4knots
Village Voice
Village Voice
4knots Music Festival (commonly known as 4knots), is a free, family friendly, one day music festival held in New York City. Launched in 2011, the festival features indie rock artists. It is produced by the weekly paper and news site, the Village Voice. The festival replaced the Village Voice's former festival, the Siren Music Festival.[1] History[edit] 4knots 2011, the first year of the festival, was held on July 16, 2011 on Governors Island
Governors Island
at South Street Seaport. The one-day lineup featured Mr. Dream, Eleanor Friedberger, Oberhofer, Davila 666, Titus Andronicus, and the Black Angels
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Maiden Lane (Manhattan)
Coordinates: 40°42′26.75″N 74°0′27.63″W / 40.7074306°N 74.0076750°W / 40.7074306; -74.0076750Looking up Broadway from the corner of Maiden Lane (at right) c. 1885-87The street level of 33 Maiden Lane, designed by Philip Johnson
Philip Johnson
and John Burgee
John Burgee
and built in 1984-8690-94 Maiden Lane, one of the few mid-19th century commercial buildings still standing in Lower ManhattanMaiden Lane is an east-west street in the Financial District of the New York City
New York City
borough of Manhattan
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