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The Seattle Star
The Seattle
Seattle
Star was a daily newspaper that ran from February 25, 1899,[1] to August 13, 1947. It was owned by E. W. Scripps
E. W. Scripps
and in 1920 was transferred to Scripps McRae League of Newspapers (later Scripps-Canfield League), after a falling-out within the Scripps family.[citation needed] The company, which eventually became Scripps League Newspapers, Inc., owned the paper until 1942, when it was sold to a group of local Seattle
Seattle
businessmen including Howard Parrish, its publisher. Soon after the sale, it reverted to its previous broadsheet format after having been a tabloid for a short time
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Seattle Star (2002–2005)
The Seattle Star was a free, neighborhood newspaper in Seattle, Washington, United States, covering the south and central sections of the city. Founded in 2002 as the South Seattle Star, it changed its name to the Seattle Star in 2004. It was distributed free. With the May 18–31, 2005, issue, the Star merged with the Seattle Sun to form the Seattle Sun and Star. It printed its last issue on July 1, 2005. The Star was unusual for being a well-written neighborhood newspaper whose issues regularly featured investigative reporting.This Washington-related article is a stub
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Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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E. W. Scripps
Edward Willis "E.W." Scripps (June 18, 1854 – March 12, 1926), was an American newspaper publisher and founder of The E. W. Scripps Company, a diversified media conglomerate, and United Press news service. It became United Press International
United Press International
(UPI) when International News Service (INS) merged with United Press in 1958. The E. W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University
Ohio University
is named for him.Contents1 Early life 2 Newspaper career 3 Later life 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading6.1 Archives7 External linksEarly life[edit] E. W. Scripps
E. W. Scripps
was born and raised in Rushville, Illinois, to James Mogg Scripps from London, and Julia Adeline Osborne (third wife) from New York. E. W. was the youngest of five children born to James and Julia. James had seven children from previous marriages. E
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Scripps League Newspapers, Inc.
Scripps League Newspapers, Inc. was a newspaper publishing company in the United States founded by Josephine Scripps in 1921 and managed beginning in 1931 by her son Ed Scripps (1909-1997).[1] Based in Herndon, Virginia, the chain was separate from the larger E. W. Scripps Company begun by Ed's grandfather, Edward Willis Scripps.[2] The chain eventually grew to 51 small newspapers[1] including The Daily Herald of Provo, Utah; Napa Valley Register of Napa, Calif.; Newport Daily Express of Newport, Vt., The Hanford Sentinel of Hanford, Calif., Arizona Daily Sun of Flagstaff, Ariz.,[1] and Haverhill Gazette
Haverhill Gazette
in Massachusetts.[3] Pulitzer Publishing Company bought Scripps League for about $230 million in 1996.[3] In 2005, Lee Enterprises
Lee Enterprises
bought the Pulitzer newspaper division.[4] References[edit]^ a b c "Edward Scripps, 88, Who Built A Chain of Mostly Small Papers"
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Seattle
Seattle
Seattle
(/siˈætəl/ ( listen)) is a seaport city on the west coast of the United States. It is the seat of King County, Washington. With an estimated 713,700 residents as of 2017[update],[3] Seattle
Seattle
is the largest city in both the state of Washington and the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region of North America. In July 2013, it was the fastest-growing major city in the United States[7] and remained in the Top 5 in May 2015 with an annual growth rate of 2.1%.[8] In July 2016, Seattle
Seattle
was again the fastest-growing major U.S. city, with a 3.1% annual growth rate.[9] The city is situated on an isthmus between Puget Sound
Puget Sound
(an inlet of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about 100 miles (160 km) south of the Canada– United States
United States
border
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Broadsheet
A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically 22 inches or 56 centimetres). The term derives from types of popular prints usually just of a single sheet, sold on the streets and containing various types of material, from ballads to political satire. The first broadsheet newspaper was the Dutch Courante uyt Italien, Duytslandt, &c
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Tabloid (newspaper Format)
A tabloid is a newspaper with a compact page size smaller than broadsheet. A tabloid is defined as "roughly 17 by 11 inches (432 by 279 mm)" and commonly "half the size of a broadsheet", although there is no standard size for this newspaper format. The term tabloid journalism refers to an emphasis on such topics as sensational crime stories, astrology, celebrity gossip and television, and is not a reference to newspapers printed in this format. Some small-format papers with a high standard of journalism refer to themselves as compact newspapers. Larger newspapers, traditionally associated with higher-quality journalism, are called broadsheets, even if the newspaper is now printed on smaller pages
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Anti-Japanese Sentiment In The United States
Anti-Japanese sentiment
Anti-Japanese sentiment
in the United States
United States
has existed since the late 19th century, during the Yellow Peril. Anti-Japanese sentiment peaked during the Second World War and again in the 1970s-1980s with the rise of Japan as a major economic power.Contents1 Origins1.1 California1.1.1 Anti-Japanese organizations 1.1.2 The Alien Land Law2 Early 20th century 3 World War II3.1 Jap
Jap
hunts 3.2 Decision to drop the atomic bombs4 Since World War II 5 See also 6 References 7 SourcesOrigins[edit] Main article: Yellow Peril In the United States, anti-Japanese sentiment had its beginnings well before World War II. Racial prejudice against Asian immigrants began building soon after Chinese workers started arriving in the country in the mid-19th century, and set the tone for the resistance Japanese would face in the decades to come
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Japanese-Americans
Japanese Americans
Americans
(日系アメリカ人, Nikkei Amerikajin) are Americans
Americans
who are fully or partially of Japanese descent, especially those who identify with that ancestry, along with their cultural characteristics
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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The Seattle Times
The Seattle
Seattle
Times is a daily newspaper serving Seattle, Washington, United States. It has the largest circulation of any newspaper in the state of Washington and in the Pacific Northwest
Pacific Northwest
region. The newspaper was founded in 1891 and has been controlled by the Blethen family since 1896. The Seattle Times Company
The Seattle Times Company
also owns local newspapers in Walla Walla and Yakima
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National Endowment For The Humanities
The National Endowment for the Humanities
Humanities
(NEH) is an independent federal agency of the U.S. government, established by the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities
Humanities
Act of 1965 (Pub.L. 89–209), dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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The Seattle Star
The Seattle
Seattle
Star was a daily newspaper that ran from February 25, 1899,[1] to August 13, 1947. It was owned by E. W. Scripps
E. W. Scripps
and in 1920 was transferred to Scripps McRae League of Newspapers (later Scripps-Canfield League), after a falling-out within the Scripps family.[citation needed] The company, which eventually became Scripps League Newspapers, Inc., owned the paper until 1942, when it was sold to a group of local Seattle
Seattle
businessmen including Howard Parrish, its publisher. Soon after the sale, it reverted to its previous broadsheet format after having been a tabloid for a short time
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