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The Rover (play)
The Rover or The Banish'd Cavaliers is a play in two parts that is written by the English author Aphra Behn. It is a revision of Thomas Killigrew's play Thomaso, or The Wanderer (1664), and depicts the amorous adventures of a group of Englishmen in Naples at Carnival time. According to Restoration poet John Dryden, it "lacks the manly vitality of Killigrew's play, but shows greater refinement of expression." The play stood for three centuries as "Behn's most popular and most respected play."[1] The Rover features multiple plot lines, dealing with the amorous adventures of a group of Englishmen in Naples at Carnival
Carnival
time.Contents1 Characters1.1 Women 1.2 Men2 Plot2.1 Act I 2.2 Act II 2.3 Act III 2.4 Act IV 2.5 Act V3 Background 4 Reception 5 Literary criticism 6 Selected modern performances 7 References 8 External linksCharacters[edit]Women[edit]FLORINDA, Sister to Don Pedro, and Hellena
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Giuseppe Bonito
Giuseppe Bonito
Giuseppe Bonito
(11 January 1707 – 9 May 1789) was a Neapolitan painter of the Rococo
Rococo
period. Giuseppe Bonito
Giuseppe Bonito
is known for genre depictions on canvas. Many of Gaspare Traversi's paintings had previously been attributed to Bonito. Biography[edit] Bonito was born at Castellammare di Stabia, and, like Traversi, was a student at the large studio of Francesco Solimena. One of his contemporaries there was Gaspare Traversi. Bonito represented urban scenes with folklore details and figures of commedia dell'arte. Between the 1736 and 1742 Bonito worked for the House of Borbon
House of Borbon
in the royal Palace of Portici. He also painted portraits including one of Maria Amalia of Saxony, wife of the Charles VII, king of Naples
Naples
and Charles III of Spain
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George Farquhar
George Farquhar
George Farquhar
(1677[1] – 29 April 1707) was an Irish dramatist. He is noted for his contributions to late Restoration comedy, particularly for his plays The Recruiting Officer
The Recruiting Officer
(1706) and The Beaux' Stratagem (1707).Contents1 Early life 2 Acting career 3 Writing career 4 Works referencing Farquhar 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in Derry, Farquhar was one of seven children born to William Farquhar, a clergyman of modest means.[2] The author of "Memoirs of Mr. George Farquhar," a biographical sketch prefixed to certain 18th century editions[3] of his works, claims that Farquhar“ discovered a Genius early devoted to the Muses
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University Of Illinois At Urbana-Champaign
The University of Illinois
Illinois
at Urbana–Champaign (also known as U of I, Illinois, or colloquially as the University of Illinois
Illinois
or UIUC)[7][8] is a public research university in the U.S. state of Illinois
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Queen's University
Queen's University
Queen's University
at Kingston[2][12][13] (commonly shortened to Queen's University
Queen's University
or Queen's) is a public research university in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. Founded on 16 October 1841 via a royal charter issued by Queen Victoria, the university predates Canada's founding by 26 years.[2] Queen's holds more than 1,400 hectares (3,500 acres) of land throughout Ontario
Ontario
and owns Herstmonceux Castle
Herstmonceux Castle
in East Sussex, England.[9] Queen's is organized into ten undergraduate, graduate, and professional faculties and schools.[14] The Church of Scotland
Church of Scotland
established Queen's College in 1841 with a royal charter from Queen Victoria
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Playwrights
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
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Susanna Centlivre
Susanna Centlivre
Susanna Centlivre
(c
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Colley Cibber
Colley Cibber
Colley Cibber
(6 November 1671 – 11 December 1757) was an English actor-manager, playwright and Poet Laureate. His colourful memoir Apology for the Life of Colley Cibber
Colley Cibber
(1740) describes his life in a personal, anecdotal and even rambling style. He wrote 25 plays for his own company at Drury Lane, half of which were adapted from various sources, which led Robert Lowe and Alexander Pope, among others, to criticise his "miserable mutilation" of "crucified Molière
Molière
[and] hapless Shakespeare". He regarded himself as first and foremost an actor and had great popular success in comical fop parts, while as a tragic actor he was persistent but much ridiculed
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William Congreve
William Congreve
William Congreve
(24 January 1670 – 19 January 1729) was an English playwright and poet of the Restoration period. He is known for his clever, satirical dialogue and influence on the comedy of manners style of that period. He was also a minor political figure in the British Whig Party.Contents1 Early life 2 Literary career 3 Later life 4 Famous lines 5 References in popular culture 6 Works 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 Sources 11 External linksEarly life[edit] William Congreve
William Congreve
was born in Bardsey, Yorkshire, England near Leeds.[note 1] His parents were William Congreve
William Congreve
(1637–1708) and Mary née Browning (1636?–1715)
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George Etherege
George may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places2.1 Australia 2.2 Canada 2.3 South Africa 2.4 United States3 In computing 4 Film and television 5 Books 6 Music 7 In transport 8 Other uses 9 See alsoPeople[edit] George (given name) George (surname) King George (other) Saint George George Washington (other)Places[edit] Australia[edit]Lake George (New South Wales)Canada[edit]George's Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador George Street (St. John's), NewfoundlandSouth Africa[edit]George, Western Cape George AirportUnited States[edit] George Air Force Base, a former U.S
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Edward Howard (playwright)
Edward Howard (baptised 1624 – 1712)[1] was an English dramatist and author of the Restoration era. He was the fifth son of Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire, and one of four playwriting brothers: Sir Robert Howard, Colonel Henry Howard, and James Howard were the others. The brothers were sometimes confused in their own era, and Edward was sometimes given credit for his brother Henry's play The United Kingdoms.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Plays 3 Poems and miscellany 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Edward Howard was christened on 2 November 1624, at St. Martin-in-the-Fields. Howard had a reputation as an exacting and difficult author
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University Of Illinois At Chicago Circle
The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) is a public research university located in Chicago, Illinois, United States. Its campus is in the Near West Side community area, adjacent to the Chicago Loop. The second campus established under the University of Illinois system, UIC is also the largest university in the Chicago area, having approximately 30,000 students[8] enrolled in 15 colleges. UIC operates the largest medical school in the United States with research expenditures exceeding $412 million and consistently ranks in the top 50 U.S. institutions for research expenditures.[9][10][11] In the 2015 U.S. News & World Report's ranking of colleges and universities, UIC ranked as the 129th best in the "national universities" category.[12] The 2015 Times Higher Education World University Rankings ranked UIC as the 18th best in the world among universities less than 50 years old.[13] UIC competes in NCAA Division I Horizon League as the UIC Flames in sports
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James Howard (dramatist)
James Howard (c. 1640 – July 1669)[1] was an English dramatist and member of a Royalist
Royalist
family during the English Civil War
English Civil War
and the Restoration. He was the 9th son of Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire and his wife Elizabeth. Howard wrote two comedies, All Mistaken, or the Mad Couple, (c.1667), and The English Mounsieur (1666). Both of these starred Nell Gwynn, the mistress of Charles II.[2] Howard had three brothers who also wrote plays — Edward Howard, Colonel Henry Howard, and Robert Howard. Their sister, Elizabeth Howard, was married to John Dryden. References[edit]^ J. P. Vander Motten, ‘Howard, James (c.1640–1669)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 ^ Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th Edition (http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/HOR_I25/HOWARD_SIR_ROBERT_16261698_.html) "Howard, James (fl.1674)"
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Robert Howard (playwright)
Sir Robert Howard (January 1626 – 3 September 1698) was an English playwright and politician, born to Thomas Howard, 1st Earl of Berkshire and his wife Elizabeth.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Family 4 References 5 Notes 6 Further readingLife[edit] As the 18-year-old son of a royalist family, he fought at the battle of Cropredy Bridge and was knighted for the bravery he showed there. In the years after the English Civil War
English Civil War
his royalist sympathies led to his imprisonment at Windsor Castle
Windsor Castle
in 1658. After the Restoration, he quickly rose to prominence in political life, with several appointments to posts which brought him influence and money. He was Member of Parliament for Stockbridge, and believed in a balance of parliament and monarchy. All his life he continued in a series of powerful positions; in 1671 he became secretary to the Treasury, and in 1673 auditor of the Exchequer
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Thomas Otway
Thomas Otway
Thomas Otway
(3 March 1652 – 14 April 1685) was an English dramatist of the Restoration period, best known for Venice Preserv'd, or A Plot Discover'd (1682).[1][2]Contents1 Life 2 Writing career 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Otway was born at Trotton
Trotton
[3] near Midhurst, the parish of which his father, Humphrey Otway, was at that time curate. Humphrey later became rector of Woolbeding,[4] a neighbouring parish, where Thomas Otway
Thomas Otway
was brought up and expected to commit to priesthood. He was educated at Winchester College, and in 1669 entered Christ Church, Oxford, as a commoner, but left the university without a degree in the autumn of 1672. At Oxford he made the acquaintance of Anthony Cary, 5th Viscount Falkland, through whom, he says in the dedication to Caius Marius, he first learned to love books
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Charles Sedley
Sir Charles Sedley, 5th Baronet
Sir Charles Sedley, 5th Baronet
(March 1639 – 20 August 1701), was an English noble, dramatist and politician. He was principally remembered for his wit and profligacy.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Legacy 4 Works4.1 Poems 4.2 Plays 4.3 Editions5 References5.1 Citations 5.2 Bibliography6 External linksLife[edit] He was the son of Sir John Sedley, 2nd Baronet, of Aylesford
Aylesford
in Kent, and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Henry Savile. The Sedleys (also sometimes spelled Sidley) had been prominent in Kent
Kent
since at least 1337. Sedley's grandfather, William Sedley, was knighted in 1605 and created a baronet in 1611. He was the founder of the Sidleian Lectures of Natural Philosophy at Oxford. Sedley was educated at Wadham College, Oxford, but left without taking a degree. There his tutor was the poet Walter Pope
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