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The Protector's War
The Protector's War is a 2005 alternate history, post-apocalyptic, science fiction novel by American writer S.M. Stirling. It is the second novel in the Emberverse series. The Protector's War describes the events of roughly a year, some eight years after the Change which altered the laws of physics in Dies the Fire. It describes the preparations of the Portland Protective Association for a war of conquest against the other communities of the Willamette Valley, their actions in response, and the arrival of three English refugees whose coming will help shape events in Oregon.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Characters 3 References to other works 4 References 5 External linksPlot summary[edit] Eight years after the Change, Clan Mackenzie, led by Juniper Mackenzie, and the Bearkillers, led by Mike Havel, have carved sections out in the Willamette Valley
Willamette Valley
for their groups
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Wagonway
Wagonways (or Waggonways) consisted of the horses, equipment and tracks used for hauling wagons, which preceded steam-powered railways. The terms plateway, tramway and dramway were used. The advantage of wagonways was that far bigger loads could be transported with the same power.Contents1 Ancient systems 2 Wooden rails 3 Metal rails3.1 Plateways, Flangeways 3.2 Edgeways4 Steam power 5 Pole road 6 Decline 7 See also 8 References 9 Bibliography 10 External linksAncient systems[edit] The earliest[citation needed] evidence is of the 6 to 8.5 km long Diolkos
Diolkos
paved trackway, which transported boats across the Isthmus of Corinth in Greece
Greece
from around 600 BC.[1][2][3][4][5] Wheeled vehicles pulled by men and animals ran in grooves in limestone, which provided the track element, preventing the wagons from leaving the intended route
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Dominic Flandry
Dominic Flandry
Dominic Flandry
is the central character in the second half of Poul Anderson's Technic History science fiction. He first appeared in 1951. The space opera series is set in the 31st century, during the waning days of the Terran Empire. Flandry is a dashing field agent of the Imperial Intelligence Corps who travels the stars to fight off imminent threats to the empire from both external enemies and internal treachery. His long-time archenemy is Aycharaych, a cultured but ruthless telepathic spymaster who weaves plots for the expansionistic rival empire of the alien Merseians. The illegitimate son of a minor nobleman, Flandry rises to considerable power within the decadent Empire by his own wits, and enjoys all the pleasures his position in society gives him. Still he is painfully conscious of the impending fall of the Terran Empire and the subsequent "Long Night" of a galactic dark age
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Nerve Agent
Nerve agents, sometimes also called nerve gases, are a class of organic chemicals that disrupt the mechanisms by which nerves transfer messages to organs. The disruption is caused by the blocking of acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter. Poisoning by a nerve agent leads to constriction of pupils, profuse salivation, convulsions, and involuntary urination and defecation, with the first symptoms appearing in seconds after exposure. Death by asphyxiation or cardiac arrest may follow in minutes due to the loss of the body's control over respiratory and other muscles. Some nerve agents are readily vaporized or aerosolized, and the primary portal of entry into the body is the respiratory system
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Pornography
Pornography
Pornography
(often abbreviated porn) is the portrayal of sexual subject matter for the exclusive purpose of sexual arousal.[1] Pornography
Pornography
may be presented in a variety of media, including books, magazines, postcards, photographs, sculpture, drawing, painting, animation, sound recording, phone calls, writing, film, video, and video games. The term applies to the depiction of the act rather than the act itself, and so does not include live exhibitions like sex shows and striptease. The primary subjects of present-day pornographic depictions are pornographic models, who pose for still photographs, and pornographic actors or porn stars, who perform in pornographic films
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Wicca
Wicca
Wicca
(English: /ˈwɪkə/), also termed Pagan Witchcraft, is a contemporary Pagan new religious movement. It was developed in England during the first half of the 20th century and was introduced to the public in 1954 by Gerald Gardner, a retired British civil servant. Wicca
Wicca
draws upon a diverse set of ancient pagan and 20th-century hermetic motifs for its theological structure and ritual practices. Wicca
Wicca
has no central authority. Its traditional core beliefs, principles and practices were originally outlined in the 1940s and 1950s by Gardner and Doreen Valiente, both in published books as well as in secret written and oral teachings passed along to their initiates. There are many variations on the core structure, and the religion grows and evolves over time
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The Lord Of The Rings
The Lord of the Rings
The Lord of the Rings
is an epic high fantasy novel written by English author and scholar J. R. R. Tolkien. The story began as a sequel to Tolkien's 1937 fantasy novel The Hobbit, but eventually developed into a much larger work. Written in stages between 1937 and 1949, The Lord of the Rings is one of the best-selling novels ever written, with over 150 million copies sold.[1] The title of the novel refers to the story's main antagonist, the Dark Lord Sauron,[note 1] who had in an earlier age created the One Ring
One Ring
to rule the other Rings of Power
Rings of Power
as the ultimate weapon in his campaign to conquer and rule all of Middle-earth
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J. R. R. Tolkien
First World WarBattle of the SommeJohn Ronald Reuel Tolkien, CBE FRSL (/ˈtɒlkiːn/;[a] 3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor who is best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. He served as the Rawlinson and Bosworth Professor of Anglo-Saxon and Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1945 and Merton Professor of English Language and Literature and Fellow of Merton College, Oxford, from 1945 to 1959.[1] He was at one time a close friend of C. S. Lewis—they were both members of the informal literary discussion group known as the Inklings
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Dúnedain
In J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, the Dúnedain /ˈduːnɛdaɪn/ (singular: Dúnadan, "man of the west") were a race of Men descended from the Númenóreans who survived the sinking of their island kingdom and came to Eriador in Middle-earth, led by Elendil and his sons, Isildur and Anárion. They are also called the Men of the West and the Men of Westernesse (direct translations of the Sindarin
Sindarin
term). They settled mainly in Arnor and Gondor. The Westron name for Dúnadan was simply Adûn, "westerner", but this name was seldom used
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Poul Anderson
Poul William Anderson (November 25, 1926 – July 31, 2001)[2] was an American science fiction author who began his career in the 1940s and continued to write into the 21st century. Anderson authored several works of fantasy, historical novels, and short stories. His awards include seven Hugo Awards and three Nebula Awards.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Political, moral and literary themes2.1 Space and liberty 2.2 World government 2.3 Libertarianism 2.4 Fairness to the adversaries 2.5 Underestimating "primitives" as a costly mistake 2.6 Tragic conflicts3 Awards 4 Bibliography 5 Fictional appearances 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Poul Anderson
Poul Anderson
was born on November 25, 1926, in Bristol, Pennsylvania, of Scandinavian parents.[4] Shortly after his birth, his father, Anton Anderson, an engineer, moved the family to Texas, where they lived for over ten years
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Samkin Aylward
The White Company is a historical adventure by Arthur Conan Doyle set during the Hundred Years' War.[1] The story is set in England, France, and Spain, in the years 1366 and 1367, against the background of the campaign of Edward, the Black Prince to restore Peter of Castile to the throne of the Kingdom of Castile. The climax of the book occurs before the Battle of Nájera. Doyle became inspired to write the novel after attending a lecture on the Middle Ages in 1889. After extensive research, The White Company was published in serialized form in 1891 in Cornhill Magazine. Additionally, the book is considered a companion to Doyle's later work Sir Nigel, which explores the early campaigns of Sir Nigel Loring and Samkin Aylward. The novel is relatively unknown today, though it was very popular up through the Second World War
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Internet Speculative Fiction Database
The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction.[2][3] The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing[4] and there is support within both and ISFDB for interlinking.[5] The data is reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.[6]Contents1 Purpose 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksPurpose[edit] The ISFDB database indexes authors, novels, short stories, publishers, awards, and magazines. Additionally, it supports author pseudonyms, series, awards, and cover art plus interior illustration credits which is combined into integrated author, artist, and publisher bibliographies
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Sir Nigel
Sir Nigel
Sir Nigel
is a historical novel set during the early phase of the Hundred Years' War, spanning the years 1350 to 1356, by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Arthur Conan Doyle
and written in 1906. It is the background story to Doyle's earlier novel The White Company, and describes the early life of that book's hero Nigel Loring, a knight in the service of King Edward III in the first phase of the Hundred Years' War. The character is loosely based on the historical knight Neil Loring. Plot[edit] The tale, at its outset, traces the fortunes of the family of Loring of the Manor of Tilford
Tilford
in Surrey,[1] many of whose scions had been prominent in the service of the Norman and Angevin Kings of England, against the backdrop of the Black Death
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Alleyne Edricson
The White Company is a historical adventure by Arthur Conan Doyle set during the Hundred Years' War.[1] The story is set in England, France, and Spain, in the years 1366 and 1367, against the background of the campaign of Edward, the Black Prince to restore Peter of Castile to the throne of the Kingdom of Castile. The climax of the book occurs before the Battle of Nájera. Doyle became inspired to write the novel after attending a lecture on the Middle Ages in 1889. After extensive research, The White Company was published in serialized form in 1891 in Cornhill Magazine. Additionally, the book is considered a companion to Doyle's later work Sir Nigel, which explores the early campaigns of Sir Nigel Loring and Samkin Aylward. The novel is relatively unknown today, though it was very popular up through the Second World War
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Hordle John
The White Company is a historical adventure by Arthur Conan Doyle set during the Hundred Years' War.[1] The story is set in England, France, and Spain, in the years 1366 and 1367, against the background of the campaign of Edward, the Black Prince to restore Peter of Castile to the throne of the Kingdom of Castile. The climax of the book occurs before the Battle of Nájera. Doyle became inspired to write the novel after attending a lecture on the Middle Ages in 1889. After extensive research, The White Company was published in serialized form in 1891 in Cornhill Magazine. Additionally, the book is considered a companion to Doyle's later work Sir Nigel, which explores the early campaigns of Sir Nigel Loring and Samkin Aylward. The novel is relatively unknown today, though it was very popular up through the Second World War
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Robert Knolles
Sir Robert Knolles
Robert Knolles
(c. 1325 – 15 August 1407) was an important English knight of the Hundred Years' War,[1] who, operating with the tacit support of the Crown, succeeded in taking the only two major French cities, other than Calais
Calais
and Poitiers, to fall to Edward III.[citation needed] His methods, however, earned him infamy as a freebooter and a ravager: the ruined gables of burned buildings came to be known as "Knolly's mitres".[2]Contents1 Breton war of succession 2 French campaign 3 Death and legacy 4 References 5 Further readingBreton war of succession[edit] Born in Cheshire,[1] Knolles first appears as the captain of several castles throughout Brittany
Brittany
in the mid-14th century, including Fougeray, Gravelle and Chateaublanc
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