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The Muses Are Heard
The Muses Are Heard
The Muses Are Heard
is an early journalistic work of Truman Capote. Originally published in The New Yorker, it is a narrative account of the cultural mission by The Everyman's Opera to the U.S.S.R.
U.S.S.R.
in the mid-1950s. Capote was sent to accompany the Opera as it staged a production of Porgy and Bess. First published in two parts, it was later released as a short non-fiction book. The book's title comes from a speech given by one of the Soviet cultural ministry staff, who declared, “When the cannons are heard, the muses are silent. When the cannons are silent, the muses are heard.” Narrative[edit] The book opens with the cast, directors, support personnel and Mrs. Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
waiting in West Berlin
Berlin
for their visas to be returned by the Russian Embassy. They are briefed by U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Anti-communism
Anti-communism
Anti-communism
is opposition to communism. Organized anti-communism developed after the 1917 October Revolution
Revolution
in Russia and it reached global dimensions during the Cold War, when the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
engaged in an intense rivalry. Anti-communism
Anti-communism
has been an element of movements holding many different political positions, including nationalist, social democratic, liberal, conservative, fascist, capitalist, anarchist and even socialist viewpoints. The first organization specifically dedicated to opposing communism was the Russian White movement, which fought in the Russian Civil War starting in 1918 against the recently established Communist government
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Laura (1944 Film)
Laura is a 1944 American film noir produced and directed by Otto Preminger. It stars Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews
Dana Andrews
and Clifton Webb
Clifton Webb
along with Vincent Price
Vincent Price
and Judith Anderson. The screenplay by Jay Dratler, Samuel Hoffenstein and Betty Reinhardt is based on the 1943 novel Laura by Vera Caspary. In 1999, Laura was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry
National Film Registry
by the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant"
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Travel Literature
The genre of travel literature encompasses outdoor literature, guide books, nature writing, and travel memoirs.[1] One early travel memoirist in Western literature was Pausanias, a Greek geographer of the 2nd century AD
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Gerald Clarke (author)
Gerald Clarke (born June 21, 1937) is an American writer, best known for the biographies Capote (1988) (made into the Oscar-winning 2005 film Capote) and Get Happy: The Life of Judy Garland (2000).[1] He has also written for magazines including Esquire, Architectural Digest, and Time Magazine, where he was a senior writer for many years. While an undergraduate at Yale, he wrote for campus humor magazine The Yale Record.[2] A native of Los Angeles, Clarke now lives in Bridgehampton, in eastern Long Island, New York. References[edit]^ "About Gerald Clarke". geraldclarke.com. Retrieved 5 October 2013.  ^ Gerber, Michael (May 12, 2004). "Meet Gary Clarke"
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Once There Was A War
Once There Was a War, published in 1958, is a collection of articles written by John Steinbeck
John Steinbeck
while he was a special war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune
New York Herald Tribune
from June to December 1943. Steinbeck's articles include descriptions of life on a troop transporter, an account of the liberation of a small Sicilian town, a description of how homesick US soldiers tried to grow their native vegetables in the English gardens where they billeted, and an account of how a detachment of US paratroopers tricked the German garrison at Ventotene
Ventotene
into surrendering. Steinbeck did not report 'straight news', as he put it: he did not cover battles, or interview national or military leaders
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John Steinbeck
John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (/ˈstaɪnbɛk/; February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American author. He won the 1962 Nobel Prize in Literature "for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception".[2] He has been called "a giant of American letters", and many of his works are considered classics of Western literature.[3] During his writing career, he authored 27 books, including 16 novels, six non-fiction books, and two collections of short stories. He is widely known for the comic novels Tortilla Flat
Tortilla Flat
(1935) and Cannery Row (1945), the multi-generation epic East of Eden (1952), and the novellas Of Mice and Men
Of Mice and Men
(1937) and The Red Pony
The Red Pony
(1937)
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On The Sunny Side Of The Street
"On the Sunny Side of the Street" is a 1930 song, with credited music composed by Jimmy McHugh
Jimmy McHugh
and lyrics by Dorothy Fields
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Christmas Tree
A Christmas
Christmas
tree is a decorated tree, usually an evergreen conifer such as spruce, pine, or fir or an artificial tree of similar appearance, associated with the celebration of Christmas. The modern Christmas
Christmas
tree was developed in medieval Livonia
Livonia
(present-day Estonia and Latvia) and early modern Germany, where Protestant Germans brought decorated trees into their homes.[1][2] It acquired popularity beyond the Lutheran
Lutheran
areas of Germany[1][3] and the Baltic countries
Baltic countries
during the second half of the 19th century, at first among the upper classes.[4] The tree was traditionally decorated with "roses made of colored paper, apples, wafers, tinsel, [and] sweetmeats"
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Bolshevik
The Bolsheviks, originally also Bolshevists[1][a] or Bolsheviki[3] (Russian: большевики, большевик (singular), IPA: [bəlʲʂɨˈvʲik]; derived from большинство bol'shinstvo, "majority", literally meaning "one of the majority"), were a faction of the Marxist Russian Social Democratic Labour Party (RSDLP) which split apart from the Menshevik
Menshevik
faction[b] at the Second Party Congress in 1903.[4] The RSDLP was a revolutionary socialist political party formed in 1898 in
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Christmas
Christmas
Christmas
is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ,[8][9] observed primarily on December 25[4][10][11] as a religious and cultural celebration among billions of people around the world.[2][12][13] A feast central to the Christian
Christian

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Leningrad
Saint
Saint
Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, tr. Sankt-Peterburg, IPA: [ˈsankt pʲɪtʲɪrˈburk] ( listen)) is Russia's second-largest city after Moscow, with five million inhabitants in 2012.[9] An important Russian port on the Baltic Sea, it has a status of a federal subject (a federal city). Situated on the Neva
Neva
River, at the head of the Gulf of Finland
Gulf of Finland
on the Baltic Sea, it was founded by Tsar
Tsar
Peter the Great
Peter the Great
on May 27 [O.S. 16] 1703
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Negro
Negro
Negro
(plural Negroes) is an archaic term traditionally used to denote persons considered to be of Negroid
Negroid
heritage. The term can be construed as offensive, inoffensive or completely neutral, largely depending on the region where it is used. It has various equivalents in other European languages.Contents1 In English1.1 United States 1.2 Liberia2 In other languages2.1 Latin
Latin
America (Portuguese and Spanish) 2.2 Other Romance languages2.2.1 Italian 2.2.2 French 2.2.3 Haitian Creole2.3 Germanic languages3 Elsewhere 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksIn EnglishA European map of West Africa, 1736
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The New Yorker
The New Yorker
The New Yorker
is an American magazine of reportage, commentary, criticism, essays, fiction, satire, cartoons, and poetry. It is published by Condé Nast. Started as a weekly in 1925, the magazine is now published 47 times annually, with five of these issues covering two-week spans. Although its reviews and events listings often focus on the cultural life of New York City, The New Yorker
The New Yorker
has a wide audience outside New York and is read internationally
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