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The Mother Of Us All
The Mother of Us All
The Mother of Us All
is an opera by Virgil Thomson
Virgil Thomson
to a libretto by Gertrude Stein. It chronicles the life of Susan B. Anthony, one of the major figures in the fight for women's suffrage in the United States. In fanciful style, it brings together characters, fictional and non-fictional, from different periods of American history.Contents1 Performance history 2 Roles 3 Synopsis3.1 Act 1 3.2 Act 24 Recordings 5 References 6 SourcesPerformance history[edit] The opera premiered on 7 May 1947 at Columbia University’s Branders Matthews Hall with soprano Dorothy Dow as Susan B
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Bass (voice Type)
A bass (/beɪs/ BAYSS) is a type of classical male singing voice and has the lowest vocal range of all voice types. According to The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, a bass is typically classified as having a vocal range extending from around the second E below middle C to the E above middle C (i.e., E2–E4).[1] Its tessitura, or comfortable range, is normally defined by the outermost lines of the bass clef. Categories of bass voices vary according to national style and classification system. Italians favour subdividing basses into the basso cantante (singing bass), basso buffo ("funny" bass), or the dramatic basso profondo (low bass). The American system[2] identifies the bass-baritone, comic bass, lyric bass, and dramatic bass. The German fach system[3] offers further distinctions: Spielbass (Bassbuffo), Schwerer Spielbass (Schwerer Bassbuffo), Charakterbass (Bassbariton), and Seriöser Bass. These classification systems can overlap
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New York City Opera
The New York City Opera
Opera
(NYCO) is an American opera company located in Manhattan
Manhattan
in New York City. The company has been active from 1943 through 2013 (when it filed for bankruptcy), and again since 2016 when it was revived. The opera company, dubbed "the people's opera" by New York Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, was founded in 1943. The company's stated purpose was to make opera accessible to a wide audience at a reasonable ticket price. It also sought to produce an innovative choice of repertory, and provide a home for American singers and composers. The company was originally housed at the New York City Center
New York City Center
theater on West 55th Street in Manhattan
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Andrew Johnson
United States ArmyUnion ArmyYears of service 1862–1865Rank Brigadier GeneralBattles/wars American Civil War Andrew Johnson
Andrew Johnson
(December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the 17th President of the United States, serving from 1865 to 1869. Johnson became president as he was vice president at the time of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. A Democrat who ran with Lincoln on the National Union ticket, Johnson came to office as the Civil War concluded. The new president favored quick restoration of the seceded states to the Union. His plans did not give protection to the former slaves, and he came into conflict with the Republican-dominated Congress, culminating in his impeachment by the House of Representatives. He was acquitted in the Senate by one vote. Johnson was born in poverty in Raleigh, North Carolina
Raleigh, North Carolina
and never attended school
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Bass-baritone
A bass-baritone is a high-lying bass or low-lying "classical" baritone voice type which shares certain qualities with the true baritone voice. The term arose in the late 19th century to describe the particular type of voice required to sing three Wagnerian roles: the Dutchman in Der fliegende Holländer, Wotan/Der Wanderer in the Ring Cycle and Hans Sachs in Die Meistersinger
Die Meistersinger
von Nürnberg. Wagner labelled these roles as Hoher Bass ("high bass")—see fach for more details.[1] The bass-baritone voice is distinguished by two attributes. First, it must be capable of singing comfortably in a baritonal tessitura. Secondly, however, it needs to have the ripely resonant lower range typically associated with the bass voice
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Daniel Webster
Daniel Webster
Daniel Webster
(January 18, 1782 – October 24, 1852) was an American politician who represented New Hampshire
New Hampshire
(1813–1817) and Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(1823–1827) in the United States House of Representatives; served as a Senator from Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(1827–1841, 1845–1850); and was the United States Secretary of State
United States Secretary of State
under Presidents William Henry Harrison
William Henry Harrison
(1841), John Tyler
John Tyler
(1841–1843), and Millard Fillmore
Millard Fillmore
(1850–1852).[2] He and James G. Blaine
James G

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Baritone
A baritone[1] is a type of classical male singing voice whose vocal range lies between the bass and the tenor voice types. It is the most common male voice.[2][3] Originally from the Greek βαρύτονος (barýtonos), meaning heavy sounding, music for this voice is typically written in the range from the second F below middle C to the F above middle C (i.e. F2–F4) in choral music, and from the second A below middle C to the A above middle C (A2 to A4) in operatic music, but can be extended at either end
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Contralto
A contralto (Italian pronunciation: [konˈtralto]) is a type of classical female singing voice whose vocal range is the lowest female voice type.[1] The contralto's vocal range is fairly rare; similar to, but different from the alto, and almost identical to that of a countertenor, typically between the F below middle C (F3 in scientific pitch notation) to the second F above middle C (F5), although, at the extremes, some voices can reach the E below middle C (E3) or the second B♭ above middle C (B♭5).[1] The contralto voice type is generally divided into the coloratura, lyric, and dramatic contralto.Contents1 History 2 Voice type 3 Subtypes and roles in opera3.1 Coloratura 3.2 Lyric 3.3 Dramatic4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] "Contralto" is primarily meaningful only in reference to classical and operatic singing, as other traditions lack a comparable system of vocal categorization
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Soprano
A soprano [soˈpraːno] is a type of classical female singing voice and has the highest vocal range of all voice types. The soprano's vocal range (using scientific pitch notation) is from approximately middle C (C4) = 261 Hz to "high A" (A5) =880 Hz in choral music, or to "soprano C" (C6, two octaves above middle C) =1046 Hz or higher in operatic music. In four-part chorale style harmony, the soprano takes the highest part, which usually encompasses the melody.[1] The soprano voice type is generally divided into the coloratura, soubrette, lyric, spinto, and dramatic soprano
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Mezzo-soprano
A mezzo-soprano or mezzo (English: /ˈmɛtsoʊ/, /ˈmɛzoʊ/; Italian: [ˈmɛddzo soˈpraːno] meaning "half soprano") is a type of classical female singing voice whose vocal range lies between the soprano and the contralto voice types. The mezzo-soprano's vocal range usually extends from the A below middle C to the A two octaves above (i.e. A3–A5 in scientific pitch notation, where middle C = C4)
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Anthony Comstock
Anthony Comstock
Anthony Comstock
(March 7, 1844 – September 21, 1915) was a United States Postal Inspector and politician dedicated to ideas of Victorian morality. The terms "comstockery" and "Comstockism" were used for his extensive campaign to censor materials he considered indecent and obscene, such as birth control information.Contents1 Life and work 2 Works 3 References in fiction and culture 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLife and work[edit] Comstock was born in New Canaan, Connecticut, the son of Polly Ann (Lockwood) and Thomas Anthony Comstock.[1] As a young man, he enlisted and fought for the Union in the American Civil War
American Civil War
from 1863 to 1865 in Company H, 17th Connecticut Infantry
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John Quincy Adams
John Quincy
John Quincy
Adams (/ˈkwɪnzi/ ( listen);[a] July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was an American statesman who served as a diplomat, minister and ambassador to foreign nations, and treaty negotiator, United States Senator, U.S. Representative (Congressman) from Massachusetts, and the sixth president of the United States from 1825 to 1829. He was the son of second president John Adams (1735–1826, served 1797–1801) and his wife, Abigail Adams. He was a member of the Federalists, like his father, but later switched to the Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later the Anti-Masonic and Whig parties when they were organized. Adams shaped early American foreign policy using his ardently nationalist commitment to U.S. republican values
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Lillian Russell
Lillian Russell
Lillian Russell
(December 4, 1860/1861[1] – June 6, 1922), born Helen Louise Leonard, was an American actress and singer. She became one of the most famous actresses and singers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, known for her beauty and style, as well as for her voice and stage presence. Russell was born in Clinton, Iowa
Clinton, Iowa
but raised in Chicago. Her parents separated when she was eighteen, and she moved to New York with her mother. She began to perform professionally by 1879, singing for Tony Pastor and playing roles in comic opera, including Gilbert and Sullivan works. Composer Edward Solomon
Edward Solomon
created roles in several of his comic operas for her in London. In 1884, they returned to New York and married in 1885, but, in 1886 Solomon was arrested for bigamy
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Ulysses S. Grant
American Civil War American Civil War
American Civil War
ServiceCampaigns: Vicksburg Chattanooga Overland Petersburg AppomattoxGeneral Order No. 11Post-war army servicePresident of the United States Presidency1868 presidential campaignElection1st inauguration1872 reelection campaignElection2nd inaugurationReconstruction 15th AmendmentScandals Reforms Grantism Peace Policy Judicial AppointmentsPost-PresidencyLater life World tour 3rd term bid Tomb Memorial Historical reputation Depictions Memoirs Bibliographyv t eUlysses Simpson Grant (born Hiram Ulysses Grant;[a] April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American soldier and statesman who served as Commanding General of the Army and President of the United States, the highest positions in the military and the government of the United States
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Kensington Town Hall, London
Kensington Town Hall is a building completed in 1976, designed by Sir Basil Spence in the brutalist style.[1] It is the headquarters for Kensington and Chelsea London Borough Council. It was commissioned to replace the two old town halls when the boroughs of Kensington and Chelsea merged.[2] Spence had been commissioned in 1965, but work was not completed until 29 November 1976, ten days after Spence's death.[3] The building was opened in 1977.[2] References[edit]^ What is being proposed?. "Kensington Town Hall refurbishment Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea". Rbkc.gov.uk. Retrieved 18 June 2017.  ^ a b "Watercolour of Kensington and Chelsea Town Hall by the architect Sir Basil Spence". Rbkc.gov.uk. 20 April 2005. Retrieved 18 June 2017.  ^ Walker, David. "Kensington and Chelsea Town Hall"
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Thaddeus Stevens
Thaddeus Stevens
Thaddeus Stevens
(April 4, 1792 – August 11, 1868) was a member of the United States House of Representatives
United States House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and one of the leaders of the Radical Republican
Radical Republican
faction of the Republican Party during the 1860s. A fierce opponent of slavery and discrimination against African-Americans, Stevens sought to secure their rights during Reconstruction, in opposition to President Andrew Johnson
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