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The Louisville Courier-Journal
Courier Journal, locally called The Courier-Journal
The Courier-Journal
or The C-J or The Courier, is the largest news organization in Kentucky. According to the 1999 Editor & Publisher International Yearbook, the paper is the 48th-largest daily paper in the U.S. and the single-largest in Kentucky.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Watterson era 1.3 Bingham ownership 1.4 Gannett
Gannett
ownership2 Awards2.1 Pulitzer Prize3 Other notable staff 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] The Courier-Journal
The Courier-Journal
was created from the merger of several newspapers introduced in Kentucky
Kentucky
in the 19th century. Pioneer paper The Focus of Politics, Commerce and Literature, was founded in 1826 in Louisville when the city was an early settlement of less than 7,000 individuals
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Oxford Journal
The Oxford
Oxford
Journal was a free newspaper distributed throughout the city of Oxford
Oxford
in the county of Oxfordshire, UK. It was published under licence by Taylor Newspapers Ltd (who also publish other free newspapers including the Basingstoke Observer, Oxford
Oxford
Property Weekly and Auto Weekly).Contents1 Early history 2 Mergers and rebrands 3 Canadian namesake 4 Related links 5 References 6 External linksEarly history[edit] The paper was launched in January 1973 from an old toy factory in Cowley by Tony Rosser and was the first free newspapers[citation needed] in the United Kingdom. It was later bought by Goodhead Press, who subsequently sold the paper to Courier Newspapers (Oxford) Ltd, owned by Bob Urwin and Peter Chatterton, in 1996 which continued to publish the paper alongside its own one, the South Oxfordshire Courier
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Gannett
Gannett Company, Inc. is a publicly traded American media holding company headquartered in Tysons Corner, Virginia, near McLean in Greater Washington DC.[3][4] It is the largest U.S. newspaper publisher as measured by total daily circulation. Its assets include the national newspaper USA Today
USA Today
and the erstwhile weekly USA Weekend. Its largest non-national newspaper is The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, Arizona
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Barry Bingham, Sr.
George Barry Bingham Sr. (February 10, 1906 – August 15, 1988) was the patriarch of a family that dominated local media in Louisville for several decades in the 20th century.Contents1 Family and career 2 Further reading 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksFamily and career[edit] Bingham's family owned a cluster of influential media properties – The Courier-Journal
The Courier-Journal
and The Louisville Times newspapers, plus WHAS Radio and WHAS Television. The papers had been purchased by his father, Col. Robert Worth Bingham, using proceeds from an inheritance left by his second wife, Mary Lily Kenan Flagler, herself the widow of railroad magnate Henry Flagler. Bingham attended Harvard University, then went into the family businesses. In 1931, he married Mary Caperton, a Radcliffe graduate. Bingham Sr
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Barry Bingham, Jr.
George Barry Bingham Jr. (September 23, 1933 – April 3, 2006 in Louisville, Kentucky) was an American newspaper publisher and television and radio executive. He was the third and last generation of the Bingham family that controlled Louisville's daily newspapers, a television station, and two radio stations for much of the 20th century. Bingham was educated at the Brooks School
Brooks School
and Harvard University.[1] "Barry Jr.," as he was almost always called, was the surviving son of Barry Bingham Sr. and the grandson of Robert Worth Bingham, who originally purchased controlling interest in The Courier-Journal
The Courier-Journal
and The Louisville Times in 1919. The original plan by Bingham Sr. was for Barry Jr. to control the family's broadcast properties, WHAS-AM-FM-TV, as well as the Standard Gravure rotogravure print plant
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WHAS-TV
WHAS-TV, virtual and VHF digital channel 11, is an ABC-affiliated television station licensed to Louisville, Kentucky, United States. The station is owned by Tegna, Inc.
Tegna, Inc.
WHAS-TV's studios are located on West Chestnut Street in Downtown Louisville, and its transmitter is located in rural northeastern Floyd County, Indiana
Floyd County, Indiana
(northeast of Floyds Knobs)
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WHAS-AM
WHAS, known by the on air branding as "News Radio 840 WHAS", is an AM radio station broadcasting in Louisville, Kentucky. It is a 50,000 Watt clear channel radio station assigned to frequency 840 kHz. With clear channel status, its nighttime signal can be heard in most of the continental U.S. and much of Canada, and even in other countries at times. The station's studios are located in the Louisville enclave of Watterson Park and the transmitter site is in Long Run in far east Jefferson County. WHAS is owned by iHeartMedia, Inc.Contents1 History1.1 HD programming2 Programming2.1 Recent history 2.2 Sports programming3 Public service 4 Notable former on-air personalities 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksHistory[edit] Its first broadcast was on July 18, 1922
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WAMZ
WAMZ is a country music-formatted radio station located in Louisville, Kentucky. The station broadcasts on 97.5 FM with an ERP of 100 kW. The station's studios are located in the Louisville enclave of Watterson Park and the transmitter site is in Brooks, Kentucky. Station history[edit] Experimental W9XEK began on July 22, 1944 at 45.5 MHz (on the original FM band). A second sister FM station was established on April 20, 1947 on the newer FM band when WCJT started at 99.7 FM as the sister station to WHAS 840. The call sign represented the initials of The Courier Journal and Louisville Times, all of which were owned by the Bingham family. By the following year, W9XEK was taken off the air and WCJT became WHAS-FM. FM was still an infant technology however, and as most early FM owners did in the early 1950s, the Binghams returned WHAS-FM's license to the FCC on December 31, 1950
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Standard Gravure
Standard Gravure was a Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville, Kentucky
rotogravure printing company founded in 1922 by Robert Worth Bingham
Robert Worth Bingham
and owned by the powerful Bingham family. For decades, it printed the weekly The Courier-Journal
Courier-Journal
Magazine as well as rotogravure sections for other newspapers as well as Parade. It was believed to be more profitable than the daily papers owned by Bingham. By the 1980s, a shrinking print market had reduced revenues, and an employee wage freeze was instituted by then President William E. Bockmon in 1982. In 1986, Bingham family patriarch Barry Bingham Sr. announced the family would sell all their media holdings including Standard Gravure. The employees of Standard Gravure made a bid to buy the company, but it was sold instead to Michael Shea from Atlanta, Georgia
Atlanta, Georgia
for $22 million
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Rotogravure
Rotogravure
Rotogravure
(roto or gravure for short) is a type of intaglio printing process, which involves engraving the image onto an image carrier. In gravure printing, the image is engraved onto a cylinder because, like offset printing and flexography, it uses a rotary printing press. Once a staple of newspaper photo features, the rotogravure process is still used for commercial printing of magazines, postcards, and corrugated (cardboard) and other product packaging.Contents1 History and development 2 Process and components2.1 Engraved cylinder 2.2 Process3 Features3.1 Advantages 3.2 Disadvantages4 See also 5 Notes 6 External linksHistory and development[edit] In the 19th century, a number of developments in photography allowed the production of photo-mechanical printing plates
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Carol Sutton
Carol Sutton (June 29, 1933 – February 19, 1985) was an American journalist. In 1974 she became the first female managing editor of a major U.S. daily newspaper, The Courier-Journal
The Courier-Journal
in Louisville, Kentucky. She was cited as the example of female achievement in journalism when Time named American Women as the 1975 People of the Year. During her tenure at the paper, it was awarded the 1976 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography for its coverage of school desegregation in Louisville. She is also credited with significantly raising the number of minority reporters on staff. "Kentucky Women Remembered," a permanent exhibit at the Kentucky State Capitol's Main Floor of watercolors of Women of Kentucky and those who help(ed) change the mindset of those upcoming. "TODAY'S WOMAN" Magazine for KY & Indiana. Daughter Kate Whaley Archer accepts the First Posthumous Award Ever Given
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Pulitzer Prize For Feature Photography
The Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Feature Photography is one of the American Pulitzer Prizes
Pulitzer Prizes
annually awarded for journalism
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Sallie Bingham
Sallie Bingham
Sallie Bingham
(born January 22, 1937) is an American author, playwright, poet, teacher, feminist activist, and philanthropist.She is the eldest daughter of Barry Bingham, Sr., patriarch of the Bingham family of Louisville, Kentucky
Louisville, Kentucky
which dominated the news media of the city and state for most of the 20th Century. Sallie Bingham's first novel was published by Houghton Mifflin
Houghton Mifflin
in 1961. It was followed by four collections of short stories; her latest, published by Sarabande Books in October 2011, is titled Mending: New and Selected Stories
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Carrollton, Kentucky Bus Collision
The Carrollton bus collision occurred on May 14, 1988, on Interstate 71 in unincorporated Carroll County, Kentucky. Involving a former school bus in use by a church youth group and a pickup truck driven by an impaired driver, the head-on collision was the deadliest incident involving drunk driving and the third-deadliest bus crash in United States history. Of the 67 people on the bus (counting the driver), there were 27 fatalities in the accident, the same number as the 1958 Prestonsburg, Kentucky
Prestonsburg, Kentucky
bus disaster and behind the 1976 Yuba City bus disaster (29) and 1963 Chualar bus crashes (32). In the aftermath of the disaster, several family members of victims became active leaders of Mothers Against Drunk Driving
Mothers Against Drunk Driving
(MADD), and one (Karolyn Nunnallee) became national president of the organization
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League Of Nations
The League of Nations
League of Nations
(abbreviated as LN in English, La Société des Nations [la sɔsjete de nɑsjɔ̃] abbreviated as SDN or SdN in French) was an intergovernmental organisation founded on 10 January 1920 as a result of the Paris Peace Conference that ended the First World War
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Nick Anderson (cartoonist)
Nick Anderson is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American syndicated editorial cartoonist whose cartoons typically present liberal viewpoints. He currently draws cartoons for The Washington Post Writers Group. He drew cartoons for the Houston Chronicle
Houston Chronicle
from 2006-2017, where the newspaper's Web site maintained a blog[1] of his cartoons and video animations. His artwork is characterized by a painterly style due to his use of Corel's Painter software, which he uses in conjunction with the Wacom Cintiq computer monitor
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