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The Lords Of The North
The Lords of the North
The Lords of the North
is the third historical novel in the Saxon Stories by Bernard Cornwell
Bernard Cornwell
published in 2006. The story is set in the 9th century Anglo-Saxon kingdoms Wessex
Wessex
and Northumbria. Uhtred wants revenge against his uncle, and falls in love. He fights for both the Danes and for Alfred.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Characters 3 Publication details 4 ReferencesPlot summary[edit] 878 - 881: Uhtred of Bebbanburg
Bebbanburg
makes his way back to his native Northumbria
Northumbria
seeking revenge against his uncle Ælfric and childhood enemies Sven the One-Eyed and Kjartan the Cruel. He travels by ship with his friend, Hild. They make landfall near Eoferwic (York) to find the region in disarray. Lord Ivarr Ivarsson and his army are engaged with the Scots in the north
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Protagonist
A protagonist (from Ancient Greek πρωταγωνιστής (protagonistes), meaning 'player of the first part, (chief actor)' is the main character in any story, such as a literary work or drama.[1][2] The protagonist is at the center of the story, makes the key decisions, and experiences the consequences of those decisions. The protagonist affects the main characters' circumstances as well, as they are often the primary actor propelling the story forward. If a story contains a subplot, or is a narrative made up of several stories, then the character who is interpreted as the protagonist of each subplot or individual story.[3] The word protagonist is used notably in stories and forms of literature and culture that contain stories, which would include dramas, novels, operas and films
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Wessex
Wessex
Wessex
(/ˈwɛsɪks/; Old English: Westseaxna rīce [westsæɑksnɑ riːt͡ʃe], "kingdom of the West Saxons") was an Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
kingdom in the south of Great Britain, from 519 until England was unified by Æthelstan
Æthelstan
in the early 10th century. The Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
believed that Wessex
Wessex
was founded by Cerdic and Cynric, but this may be a legend. The two main sources for the history of Wessex
Wessex
are the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
and the West Saxon Genealogical Regnal List, which sometimes conflict. Wessex
Wessex
became a Christian kingdom after Cenwalh was baptised and was expanded under his rule. Cædwalla
Cædwalla
later conquered Sussex, Kent
Kent
and the Isle of Wight
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Saint Cuthbert
Cuthbert
Cuthbert
(c. 634 – 20 March 687) is a saint of the early Northumbrian church in the Celtic tradition. He was a monk, bishop and hermit, associated with the monasteries of Melrose and Lindisfarne
Lindisfarne
in what might loosely be termed the Kingdom of Northumbria
Kingdom of Northumbria
in the North East of England[5] and the South East of Scotland. After his death he became one of the most important medieval saints of Northern England, with a cult centred on his tomb at Durham Cathedral. Cuthbert
Cuthbert
is regarded as the patron saint of Northern England. His feast days are 20 March ( Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and Church of England), also 31 August (Episcopal Church (USA)) and 4 September (Church in Wales). Cuthbert
Cuthbert
grew up near Melrose Abbey, a daughter-house of Lindisfarne, today in Scotland
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Ivar The Boneless
Ivar the Boneless
Ivar the Boneless
(Old Norse: Ívarr hinn Beinlausi; Old English: Hyngwar) was a Viking
Viking
leader and a commander who invaded what is now England. According to the Tale of Ragnar Lodbrok, he was the son of Ragnar Loðbrok
Ragnar Loðbrok
and Aslaug. His brothers included Björn Ironside, Halfdan Ragnarsson, Hvitserk, Sigurd Snake-in-the-Eye and Ubba. The origin of the nickname is not certain. The sagas describe him as lacking bones. A genetic condition, osteogenesis imperfecta, is known to cause the body to appear to have "an imperfect bone formation", because the body and limbs can bend off beyond the usual joint limitations, and produce other ill effects and degrading functions. It was known by the Ancient Greeks and Romans
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Alfred The Great
Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
(Old English: Ælfrēd,[a] Ælfrǣd[b], "elf counsel" or "wise elf"; 849 – 26 October 899) was King of Wessex
King of Wessex
from 871 to 899. Alfred was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf
Æthelwulf
of Wessex. Taking the throne after the death of his brother Æthelred, Alfred spent several years dealing with Viking
Viking
invasions. After a decisive victory in the Battle of Edington
Battle of Edington
in 878 Alfred made an agreement with the Vikings, creating what was known as Danelaw
Danelaw
in the North of England
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Uhtred Ragnarson/Uhtredson
Uhtred of Bebbanburg is the main character of the best selling Saxon Stories novel series by Bernard Cornwell and the BBC television adaptation, The Last Kingdom. Uhtred is in part based upon the historical Uhtred the Bold from the 11th century. However, the timeline of the fictional Uhtred fits better with Uhtred, an ealdorman of Derbyshire who flourished in the 10th century, believed to have come from Northumbria. Over the nine current books, Uhtred, a Saxon pagan, has become increasingly complex in his loyalty and general attitude.Contents1 Biography 2 Women2.1 Brida 2.2 Mildrith 2.3 Iseult 2.4 Hild 2.5 Gisela 2.6 Æthelflaed 2.7 Skade 2.8 Sigunn 2.9 Eadith3 Personality 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Uhtred was born as the son of Ealdorman Uhtred, Lord of Bebbanburg, and raised to have hatred towards the surrounding kingdoms of Mercia, East Anglia, Wessex, Scotland and the Danes. Uhtred was originally called Osbert and was the younger of Ealdorman Uhtred's sons
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The Last Kingdom
The Last Kingdom
The Last Kingdom
is the first historical novel in The Saxon Stories
The Saxon Stories
by Bernard Cornwell, published in 2004. This story introduces Uhtred Ragnarson, born a Saxon then kidnapped by raiding Danes who raise him from age 11,[1][better source needed] teaching him how to be a warrior.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Characters in "The Last Kingdom"2.1 Fictional 2.2 Historical3 Television adaptation 4 Publication details 5 References 6 External linksPlot summary[edit] 866 - 876: Osbert is 9 years old and the second son of Ealdorman Uhtred, Lord of Bebbanburg
Bebbanburg
in Northumbria. Danes raid Bebbanburg
Bebbanburg
and Ealdorman Uhtred's first son, also called Uhtred, is killed and his body desecrated after he is sent out to scout the raiders
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Durham, England
Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/, locally /ˈdɜːrəm/) is a historic city and the county town of County Durham
County Durham
in North East England. The city lies on the River Wear, to the west of Sunderland, south of Newcastle upon Tyne and to the north of Darlington. Founded over the final resting place of St Cuthbert, its Norman cathedral became a centre of pilgrimage in medieval England. The cathedral and adjacent 11th-century castle were designated a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
by UNESCO
UNESCO
in 1986. The castle has been the home of Durham University
Durham University
since 1832
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Jutland
Jutland
Jutland
(/ˈdʒʌtlənd/; Danish: Jylland [ˈjylanˀ]; German: Jütland [ˈjyːtlant]), also known as the Cimbric or Cimbrian Peninsula (Latin: Cimbricus Chersonesus; Danish: Den Kimbriske Halvø; German: Kimbrische Halbinsel), is a peninsula of Northern Europe
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Northumbria
The Kingdom of Northumbria (/nɔːrˈθʌmbriə/; Old English: Norþanhymbra rīce[1]) was a medieval Anglian kingdom in what is now northern England and south-east Scotland. The name derives from the Old English Norþan-hymbre meaning "the people or province north of the Humber,"[2] which reflects the approximate southern limit to the kingdom's territory, the Humber Estuary. Northumbria started to consolidate into one kingdom in the early seventh century. At its height, the kingdom extended from just south of the Humber to the River Mersey and to the Firth of Forth, in Scotland. Northumbria ceased to be an independent kingdom in the mid-tenth century. Northumbria is also used in the names of some North East regional institutions, particularly the police force (Northumbria Police, which covers Northumberland and Tyne and Wear), a university (Northumbria University) based in Newcastle upon Tyne and Northumbria Army Cadet Force, as well as the regionalist Northumbrian Association[3]
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Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Hardcover
A hardcover or hardback (also known as hardbound, and sometimes as case-bound) book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with buckram or other cloth, heavy paper, or occasionally leather). It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN
ISBN
sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation Hbk.Detail of "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea", first English edition (1873), showing cloth pattern on cover Hardcover
Hardcover
books are often printed on acid-free paper, and they are much more durable than paperbacks, which have flexible, easily damaged paper covers. Hardcover
Hardcover
books are marginally more costly to manufacture
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HarperCollins
HarperCollins
HarperCollins
Publishers L.L.C. is one of the world's largest publishing companies and is one of the Big Five English-language publishing companies, alongside Hachette, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster. The company is headquartered in New York City and is a subsidiary of News Corp. The name is a combination of several publishing firm names: Harper & Row, an American publishing company acquired in 1987 (whose own name was the result of an earlier merger of Harper & Brothers (founded 1817) and Row, Peterson & Company), together with UK publishing company William Collins, Sons (founded 1819), acquired in 1990. The worldwide CEO of HarperCollins
HarperCollins
is Brian Murray.[1] HarperCollins has publishing groups in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, India, and China
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