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The Library Of America
The Library of America
Library of America
(LOA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. Founded in 1979 with seed money from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Ford Foundation, the LOA has published over 300 volumes by a wide range of authors from Mark Twain to Philip Roth, Nathaniel Hawthorne
Nathaniel Hawthorne
to Saul Bellow, including the selected writings of several U.S
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Penguin Random House
Penguin Random House (PRH) is an American multinational publishing company formed in 2013 from the merger of Random House (owned by German media conglomerate Bertelsmann) and Penguin Group
Penguin Group
(owned by British publishing company Pearson PLC).[1][2] As of 2013, Penguin Random House employed about 10,000 people globally and published 15,000 titles annually under its 250 divisions and imprints. These titles include fiction and nonfiction for adults and children in both print and digital
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G. Thomas Tanselle
G. Thomas Tanselle (born 1934) is an American textual critic, bibliographer, and book collector, especially known for his work on Herman Melville. He was Vice-President, John Simon Guggenheim Foundation, 1978-2006.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Theories of textual editing and influence 3 Major publications 4 References and further reading 5 Notes 6 External linksBiography[edit] Tanselle is a native of Lebanon, Indiana
Lebanon, Indiana
and received his undergraduate degree from Yale University. Tanselle attended graduate school at Northwestern University
Northwestern University
where he studied with Harrison Hayford among others
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Acid-free Paper
Acid-free paper
Acid-free paper
is paper that if infused in water yields a neutral or basic pH (7 or slightly greater)
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American National Standards Institute
The American National Standards Institute
American National Standards Institute
(ANSI, /ˈænsi/ AN-see) is a private non-profit organization that oversees the development of voluntary consensus standards for products, services, processes, systems, and personnel in the United States.[3] The organization also coordinates U.S. standards with international standards so that American products can be used worldwide. ANSI accredits standards that are developed by representatives of other standards organizations, government agencies, consumer groups, companies, and others. These standards ensure that the characteristics and performance of products are consistent, that people use the same definitions and terms, and that products are tested the same way
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Smyth-sewn
Bookbinding
Bookbinding
is the process of physically assembling a book from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets. The stack is then bound together along one edge by either sewing with thread through the folds or by a layer of flexible adhesive. Alternative methods of binding that are cheaper but less permanent include loose-leaf rings, individual screw posts or binding posts, twin loop spine coils, plastic spiral coils, and plastic spine combs. For protection, the bound stack is either wrapped in a flexible cover or attached to stiff boards. Finally, an attractive cover is adhered to the boards, including identifying information and decoration
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Golden Ratio
In mathematics, two quantities are in the golden ratio if their ratio is the same as the ratio of their sum to the larger of the two quantities. The figure on the right illustrates the geometric relationship
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Galliard (typeface)
Linotype International Typeface CorporationDate released 1978 Galliard
Galliard
is the name of a serif typeface designed by Matthew Carter and issued in 1978 by the Mergenthaler Linotype Company.[1] Galliard
Galliard
is based on the sixteenth-century type of Robert Granjon.[2] According to Alexander Lawson, "The name Galliard
Galliard
stems from Granjon's own term for an 8-point font he cut about 1570
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Herman Melville
Herman Melville[a] (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance period. His best known works include Typee
Typee
(1846), a romantic account of his experiences in Polynesian life, and his whaling novel Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
(1851). His work was almost forgotten during his last 30 years. His writing draws on his experience at sea as a common sailor, exploration of literature and philosophy, and engagement in the contradictions of American society in a period of rapid change. He developed a complex, baroque style; the vocabulary is rich and original, a strong sense of rhythm infuses the elaborate sentences, the imagery is often mystical or ironic, and the abundance of allusion extends to biblical scripture, myth, philosophy, literature, and the visual arts. Melville was born in New York City, the third child of a merchant in French dry goods and his wife
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Typee
Typee: A Peep at Polynesian Life is the first book by American writer Herman Melville, published first in London, then New York, in 1846. Considered a classic in travel and adventure literature, the narrative is partly based on the author's actual experiences on the island Nuku Hiva in the South Pacific Marquesas Islands
Marquesas Islands
in 1842, liberally supplemented with imaginative reconstruction and adaptation of material from other books
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Omoo
Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas is the second book by American writer Herman Melville, first published in London in 1847, and a sequel to his first South Sea narrative Typee, also based on the author's experiences in the South Pacific. After leaving the island of Nuku Hiva, the main character ships aboard a whaling vessel that makes its way to Tahiti, after which there is a mutiny and the majority of the crew are imprisoned on Tahiti. In 1949, the novel was adapted into the exploitation film Omoo-Omoo, the Shark God.Contents1 Background 2 Publication history 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBackground[edit] In the Preface to Omoo, Melville claimed to have written "from simple recollection" strengthened by his retelling the story many times before family and friends
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Mardi
Mardi, and a Voyage Thither is the third book by American writer Herman Melville, first published in London in 1849. Beginning as a travelogue in the vein of the author's two previous efforts, the adventure story gives way to a romance story, which in its turn gives way to a philosophical quest.Contents1 Overview 2 Style2.1 Influence of Rabelais
Rabelais
and Swift3 Structure 4 Themes 5 Reception5.1 Contemporary reviews 5.2 Later critical history6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksOverview[edit] Mardi
Mardi
is Melville's first pure fiction work (while featuring fictional narrators; his previous novels were heavily autobiographical)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Nonprofit
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
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Walt Whitman
Walter "Walt" Whitman (/ˈhwɪtmən/; May 31, 1819 – March 26, 1892) was an American poet, essayist, and journalist. A humanist, he was a part of the transition between transcendentalism and realism, incorporating both views in his works. Whitman is among the most influential poets in the American canon, often called the father of free verse.[1] His work was very controversial in its time, particularly his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was described as obscene for its overt sexuality. Born in Huntington on Long Island, Whitman worked as a journalist, a teacher, a government clerk, and—in addition to publishing his poetry—was a volunteer nurse during the American Civil War. Early in his career, he also produced a temperance novel, Franklin Evans (1842). Whitman's major work, Leaves of Grass, was first published in 1855 with his own money. The work was an attempt at reaching out to the common person with an American epic
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Justin Kaplan
Justin Daniel "Joe" Kaplan (September 5, 1925 in Manhattan, New York City – March 2, 2014 in Cambridge, Massachusetts) was an American writer and editor. The general editor of Bartlett's Familiar Quotations (16th and 17th eds.), he was best known as a biographer, particularly of Samuel Clemens, Lincoln Steffens, and Walt Whitman.Contents1 Life 2 Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain 3 Other Biographies 4 Bartlett's Familiar Quotations 5 Memoirs 6 Death 7 Notes 8 Bibliography 9 ReferencesLife[edit] The son of Tobias D. Kaplan, a successful shirt manufacturer in New York City, and Anna (Rudman) Kaplan, a homemaker, Kaplan was born in Manhattan. Both of his parents died by the time he was nine
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