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The Library Of America
The LIBRARY OF AMERICA (LOA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature
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Acid-free Paper
ACID-FREE PAPER is paper that if infused in water yields a neutral or basic pH (7 or slightly greater). It can be made from any cellulose fiber as long as the active acid pulp is eliminated during processing. It is also lignin - and sulfur -free. Acid-free paper
Acid-free paper
addresses the problem of preserving documents and artwork for long periods. CONTENTS * 1 Overview * 2 Standards * 3 Archival paper * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links OVERVIEW Paper
Paper
made from wood-based pulp that has not had its lignin removed turns yellow, becomes brittle, and deteriorates over time. When exposed to light and/or heat, the molecules in the acidic paper will break down even faster. Acidic wood-pulp paper became commonplace in the late 19th century, and in the 1930s William Barrow (a chemist and librarian) published a report about the deterioration of acidic paper in the libraries
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Smyth-sewn
BOOKBINDING is the process of physically assembling a book from an ordered stack of paper sheets that are folded together into sections or sometimes left as a stack of individual sheets. The stack is then bound together along one edge by either sewing with thread through the folds or by a layer of flexible adhesive. Alternative methods of binding that are cheaper but less permanent include loose-leaf rings, individual screw posts or binding posts, twin loop spine coils, plastic spiral coils, and plastic spine combs. For protection, the bound stack is either wrapped in a flexible cover or attached to stiff boards. Finally, an attractive cover is adhered to the boards, including identifying information and decoration. Book
Book
artists or specialists in book decoration can also greatly enhance a book's content by creating book-like objects with artistic merit of exceptional quality. Before the computer age, the bookbinding trade involved two divisions
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Galliard (typeface)
Linotype International Typeface Corporation DATE RELEASED 1978GALLIARD is the name of a serif typeface designed by Matthew Carter and issued in 1978 by the Mergenthaler Linotype Company . Galliard is based on the sixteenth-century type of Robert Granjon . According to Alexander Lawson, "The name Galliard stems from Granjon's own term for an 8-point font he cut about 1570. It undoubtedly refers to the style of the face, for the galliard was a lively dance of the period." Explaining what drew him to Granjon's work, Carter wrote on some of his more characteristic letterforms: "looking at them, adjectives like 'spirited, 'tense' and 'vigorous' come to mind...it is easy to admire Granjon's work." Mike Parker , Director of Typographic Development at Mergenthaler Linotype, had been inspired by seeing the types of Granjon at the Plantin-Moretus Museum in Antwerp. Matthew Carter, who joined Mergenthaler Linotype as a typeface designer in 1965, was also an admirer
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Herman Melville
HERMAN MELVILLE (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist , short story writer, and poet of the American Renaissance period. His best known works include Typee (1846), a romantic account of his experiences in Polynesian life, and his whaling novel Moby-Dick
Moby-Dick
(1851). His work was almost forgotten during his last thirty years. His writing draws on his experience at sea as a common sailor, exploration of literature and philosophy, and engagement in the contradictions of American society in a period of rapid change. He developed a complex, baroque style: the vocabulary is rich and original, a strong sense of rhythm infuses the elaborate sentences, the imagery is often mystical or ironic, and the abundance of allusion extends to biblical Scripture , myth, philosophy, literature, and the visual arts
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Arthur Goldhammer
ARTHUR GOLDHAMMER (born November 17, 1946) is an American academic and translator. Goldhammer studied mathematics at MIT
MIT
, gaining his PhD in 1973. Since 1977 he has worked as a translator. He is currently based at the Center for European Studies at Harvard
Harvard

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Moby-Dick
MOBY-DICK; OR, THE WHALE is a novel by American writer Herman Melville , published in 1851 during the period of the American Renaissance . Sailor Ishmael tells the story of the obsessive quest of Ahab , captain of the whaler the Pequod , for revenge on Moby Dick , the white whale that on the previous whaling voyage bit off Ahab's leg at the knee. The novel was a commercial failure and out of print at the time of the author's death in 1891, but during the 20th century, its reputation as a Great American Novel
Novel
was established. William Faulkner confessed he wished he had written it himself, and D. H. Lawrence called it "one of the strangest and most wonderful books in the world", and "the greatest book of the sea ever written". "Call me Ishmael" is among world literature's most famous opening sentences
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Henry James
HENRY JAMES, OM ((1843-04-15)15 April 1843 – 28 February 1916(1916-02-28)) was an American author, who largely relocated to Europe as a young man and acquired British citizenship near the end of his life. James is regarded as a key transitional figure between literary realism and literary modernism , and is considered by many to be among the greatest novelists in the English language. He was the son of Henry James, Sr. and the brother of renowned philosopher and psychologist William James and diarist Alice James . He is best known for a number of novels dealing with the social and marital interplay between emigre Americans, English people, and continental Europeans – examples of such novels include Portrait of a Lady , The Ambassadors , and The Wings of the Dove . His later works were increasingly experimental
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Richard Wright (author)
RICHARD NATHANIEL WRIGHT (September 4, 1908 – November 28, 1960) was an American author of sometimes controversial novels, short stories, poems, and non-fiction. Much of his literature concerns racial themes, especially related to the plight of African Americans during the late 19th to mid-20th centuries, who suffered discrimination and violence in the South and the North. Literary critics believe his work helped change race relations in the United States in the mid-20th century
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Nonprofit
A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION (also known as a NON-BUSINESS ENTITY ) is an organization that has been formed by a group of people in order "to pursue a common not-for-profit goal", that is, to pursue a stated goal without the intention of distributing excess revenue to members or leaders. A nonprofit organization is often dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a particular point of view. In economic terms, a nonprofit organization uses its surplus revenues to further achieve its purpose or mission, rather than distributing its surplus income to the organization's shareholders (or equivalents) as profit or dividends . This is known as the non-distribution constraint. The decision to adopt a nonprofit legal structure is one that will often have taxation implications, particularly where the nonprofit seeks income tax exemption or charitable status
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Francis Parkman
FRANCIS PARKMAN, JR. (September 16, 1823 – November 8, 1893) was an American historian, best known as author of The Oregon Trail: Sketches of Prairie and Rocky-Mountain Life and his monumental seven-volume France and England in North America . These works are still valued as historical sources and as literature. He was also a leading horticulturist , briefly a professor of Horticulture
Horticulture
at Harvard University and author of several books on the topic. Parkman was a trustee of the Boston
Boston
Athenæum from 1858 until his death in 1893
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Typee
TYPEE: A PEEP AT POLYNESIAN LIFE is the first book by American writer Herman Melville , published first in London, then New York, in 1846. Considered a classic in travel and adventure literature , the narrative is partly based on the author's actual experiences on the island Nuku Hiva in the South Pacific Marquesas Islands in 1842, liberally supplemented with imaginative reconstruction and adaptation of material from other books. The title is from the province Tai Pi Vai . Typee was Melville's most popular work during his lifetime; it made him notorious as the "man who lived among the cannibals"
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Omoo
OMOO: A NARRATIVE OF ADVENTURES IN THE SOUTH SEAS is the second book by American writer Herman Melville , first published in London in 1847, and a sequel to his first South Sea narrative Typee , also based on the author's experiences in the South Pacific. After leaving the island of Nuku Hiva , the main character ships aboard a whaling vessel that makes its way to Tahiti , after which there is a mutiny and the majority of the crew are imprisoned on Tahiti. In 1949, the novel was adapted into the exploitation film Omoo-Omoo, the Shark God . CONTENTS * 1 Background * 2 Publication history * 3 Notes * 4 References * 5 External links BACKGROUNDIn the Preface to Omoo, Melville claimed to have written "from simple recollection" strengthened by his retelling the story many times before family and friends. Yet a scholar working in the late 1930s discovered that Melville had not simply relied on his memory and went on to reveal a wealth of sources
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Harriet Beecher Stowe
HARRIET ELISABETH BEECHER STOWE (/stoʊ/ ; June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. She came from the Beecher family , a famous religious family, and is best known for her novel Uncle Tom\'s Cabin (1852), which depicts the harsh conditions for enslaved African Americans. The book reached millions as a novel and play, and became influential in the United States and Great Britain, energizing anti-slavery forces in the American North , while provoking widespread anger in the South . Stowe wrote 30 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential for both her writings and her public stances on social issues of the day
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Jack London
JOHN GRIFFITH "JACK" LONDON (born JOHN GRIFFITH CHANEY; January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916) was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the then-burgeoning world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first fiction writers to obtain worldwide celebrity and a large fortune from his fiction alone, including science fiction . Some of his most famous works include The Call of the Wild and White Fang , both set in the Klondike Gold Rush , as well as the short stories " To Build a Fire ", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life". He also wrote about the South Pacific in stories such as "The Pearls of Parlay" and " The Heathen ", and of the San Francisco
San Francisco
Bay area in The Sea Wolf
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William Dean Howells
WILLIAM DEAN HOWELLS (/ˈhaʊəlz/ ; March 1, 1837 – May 11, 1920) was an American realist novelist, literary critic, and playwright , nicknamed "The Dean of American Letters". He was particularly known for his tenure as editor of The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Monthly , as well as for his own prolific writings, including the Christmas story "Christmas Every Day " and the novels The Rise of Silas Lapham and A Traveler from Altruria
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