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The Last Will Of A Russian Fascist
The Last Will of a Russian Fascist (Russian: Завещание русского фашиста, Zaveshchanie russkogo fashista) is a reprint edition published in 2001 of a book by Konstantin Rodzaevsky, the leader of the All-Russia Fascist Party. Circulation of the book was 12,000 copies, of which 5,000 were a first-edition volume with illustrations, and the remainder were a second-edition volume without illustrations.[1]Contents1 Preface 2 Monograph 3 Azbuka fashizma 4 Party documents 5 Articles 6 Necessary additions 7 Banned in Russia 8 Notes 9 ReferencesPreface[edit] The book begins with a preface by I. Dyakov, "At the edge of Russian graves", and a biography of Konstantin Rodzaevsky
Konstantin Rodzaevsky
written by K
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Derzhava (Russian Party)
Derzhava (Russian: Держава) is a Russian populist, nationalist party founded by Alexander Rutskoy
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Russophilia
Russophilia
Russophilia
(literally love of Russia
Russia
or Russians) is individual or collective admiration of Russia
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Western Ukrainian Russophiles
Russophiles of Galicia
Russophiles of Galicia
or Moscophiles (Ukrainian: Pусофіли, москвофіли, translit. Rusofily) were participants in a cultural and political movement largely in the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
(currently western Ukraine). This ideology emphasized that since the Eastern Slavic people of Galicia were descendents of the people of Kievan Rus'
Kievan Rus'
(Ruthenians), and followers of Eastern Christianity, that they were thus a branch of the Russian people. The movement was part of the whole Pan-Slavism
Pan-Slavism
that was developing in the late 19th century
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White Movement
PA-RG: Alexander Kolchak
Alexander Kolchak
(1918–20) North-West Army: Nikolai Yudenich
Nikolai Yudenich
(1919–20) Volunteer Army:
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Smenovekhovtsy
The Smenovekhovtsy
Smenovekhovtsy
(Russian: Сменовеховцы, IPA: [smʲɪnəˈvʲexəftsɨ]) is the name for a political movement in the Russian émigré community that began shortly after the publication of the magazine Smena Vekh ("Change of Signposts") in Prague
Prague
in 1921.[1] This publication had taken its name from the Russian philosophical publication Vekhi ("Signposts") published in 1909. The thoughts published in the "Smena Vekh" periodical told its White émigré readers:"The Civil War is lost definitely
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Soviet Socialist Patriotism
Soviet socialist patriotism
Soviet socialist patriotism
refers to the socialist patriotism involving cultural attachment of the Soviet people
Soviet people
to the Soviet Union as their homeland.[1] It has been referred to as "Soviet nation
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2014 Pro-Russian Unrest In Ukraine
Ukrainian GovernmentMinistry of Internal AffairsNational Guard of UkraineAzov Battalion Dnipro Battalion Donbas Battalion[9] Kharkiv
Kharkiv
BattalionArmed Forces of UkraineGround ForcesAidar BattalionSecurity Service of Ukraine[10] Euromaidan
Euromaidan
activis
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All-Russian Nation
The All-Russian nation
All-Russian nation
(Russian: общерусский народ, translit. obshcherusskiy narod), also known as the pan-Russian nation or the triune Russian nation (Russian: триединый русский народ, translit. triyedinyy russkiy narod) is a Russophile and Russian irredentist ideology which sees the Russian nation as comprising the three historical and regional regions of Kievan Rus'
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Collector Of Russian Lands
Collector of Russian land(s) (Russian: собиратель русской земли, sobiratel russkoi zemli) is a historical concept and study of expansion policy of the Grand Duchy of Muscovy and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania. The term could be found in works of several historians such as Dmitry Ilovaysky ("History of Ruthenia: Muscovy-Lithuanian period or Collectors of Ruthenia (Rus)"),[1] Kazimierz Waliszewski ("First Romanovs",[2] "Ivan Grozny")[3] and many others. In the historical studies of Russia the concept justifies the liquidation of political (feudal) fragmentation in post Golden Horde period.[4] See also[edit]All-Russian nation Of all Rus'References[edit]^ Brief description of the book "History of Ruthenia". Google ebook. ^ Brief description of the book "First Romanovs". Google ebook. ^ Brief description of the book "Ivan Grozny". Google ebook. ^ Unification of Russian lands around Moscow
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Orthodoxy, Autocracy, And Nationality
Orthodoxy, Autocracy, and Nationality
Nationality
(Russian: Правосла́вие, самодержа́вие, наро́дность, Pravoslávie, samoderzhávie, naródnost'), also known as Official Nationality,[1][2] was the dominant ideological doctrine of Russian emperor Nicholas I
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Russia For Russians
Russia
Russia
for Russians
Russians
(Russian: Росси́я для ру́сских, Rossiya dlya russkikh, Russian pronunciation: [rɐˈsʲijə dʲlʲɪ ˈruskʲɪx]) is a political slogan and nationalist doctrine, encapsulating the range of ideas from bestowing the ethnic Russians with exclusive rights in the Russian state to expelling all non- Russians
Russians
from the country
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Nostalgia For The Soviet Union
Nostalgia
Nostalgia
for the Soviet Union[1] or Soviet nostalgia[2][3] is a moral-psychological phenomenon of nostalgia for the Soviet era, whether its politics, its society, its culture, or simply its aesthetics. Such nostalgia is most common among people in Russia and the other post-Soviet states, as well as persons born in the Soviet Union but long since living abroad.Contents1 Overview 2 Revival of Stalin's cult 3 Legacy 4 See also4.1 Communist nostalgia in Europe5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links7.1 News 7.2 Internet societiesOverview[edit]Marxist–Leninist activists laying wreaths at Stalin's grave in 2009Soviet nostalgia often results from the frustration Russia experienced after the dissolution of the Soviet Union
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Slavophilia
Slavophilia
Slavophilia
was an intellectual movement originating from 19th century that wanted the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
to be developed upon values and institutions derived from its early history. Slavophiles opposed the influences of Western Europe
Western Europe
in Russia.[1] There were also similar movements in Poland, Serbia
Serbia
and Croatia, Bulgaria, and Prag. Depending on the historical context, its opposite could be termed Slavophobia, a fear of Slavic culture, or even what some Russian intellectuals called zapadnichestvo (westernism).Contents1 History 2 Doctrine 3 After serfdom 4 Pochvennichestvo 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Slavophilia, as an intellectual movement, was developed in the 19th-century Russia. In a sense, there was not one but many Slavophile movements or many branches of the same movement
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Third Rome
Third Rome
Rome
is the hypothetical successor to the legacy of ancient Rome (the "first Rome")
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Eurasianism
Eurasianism
Eurasianism
(Russian: Евразийство, Yevraziystvo) is a political movement in Russia, formerly within the primarily Russian émigré community,[citation needed] that posits that Russian civilisation does not belong in the "European" or "Asian" categories but instead to the geopolitical concept of Eurasia. Originally developing in the 1920s, the movement was supportive of the Bolshevik Revolution but not its stated goals of enacting communism, seeing the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as a stepping stone on the path to creating a new national identity that would reflect the unique character of Russia's geopolitical position
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