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The King Of The Cats
The King of the Cats
The King of the Cats
(or The King o' the Cats) is a folk tale from the British Isles.[1] The earliest known example is found in Beware the Cat, written by William Baldwin
William Baldwin
in 1553,[nb 1] though it is related to the first century story of "The Death of Pan". Other notable versions include one in a letter written by Thomas Lyttelton, 2nd Baron Lyttelton, first published in 1782,[nb 2] M. G
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John D. Batten
John Dickson Batten (8 October 1860 – 5 August 1932), born in Plymouth, Devon, was an English painter of figures in oils, tempera and fresco and a book illustrator and printmaker. He was an active member of the Society of Painters in Tempera, with his wife Mary Batten, a gilder.Contents1 Career 2 Gallery 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] As a student at the Slade School of Fine Arts
Slade School of Fine Arts
under Alphonse Legros
Alphonse Legros
he exhibited until 1887 at the Grosvenor Gallery
Grosvenor Gallery
with Sir Edward Burne-Jones
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Ernest Rhys
Ernest Percival Rhys (/riːs/; 17 July 1859 – 25 May 1946) was a Welsh-English writer, best known for his role as founding editor of the Everyman's Library
Everyman's Library
series of affordable classics. He wrote essays, stories, poetry, novels and plays.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 As editor 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Rhys was born in London, and brought up in Carmarthen
Carmarthen
and Newcastle-upon-Tyne. After working in the coal industry, he was employed doing editorial work on the Camelot Series of 65 reprints and translations from 1886, for five years, while he turned to writing as a profession. He was a founder member in 1890 of the Rhymers' Club
Rhymers' Club
in London, and a contributor to The Book of the Rhymers' Club
Rhymers' Club
(1893). In 1906, Rhys persuaded J. M
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W. B. Yeats
William Butler Yeats[a] (13 June 1865 – 28 January 1939) was an Irish poet and one of the foremost figures of 20th-century literature. A pillar of both the Irish and British literary establishments, he helped to found the Abbey Theatre, and in his later years served as an Irish Senator for two terms. Yeats was a driving force behind the Irish Literary Revival
Irish Literary Revival
along with Lady Gregory, Edward Martyn and others. He was born in Sandymount, Ireland and educated there and in London. He spent childhood holidays in County Sligo
County Sligo
and studied poetry from an early age when he became fascinated by Irish legends and the occult. These topics feature in the first phase of his work, which lasted roughly until the turn of the 20th century
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Conall Cernach
Conall Cernach (modern spelling: Conall Cearnach) is a hero of the Ulaid
Ulaid
in the Ulster Cycle of Irish mythology. He is said to have always slept with the head of a Connachtman under his knee
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Padraic Colum
Padraic Colum
Padraic Colum
(8 December 1881 – 11 January 1972) was an Irish poet, novelist, dramatist, biographer, playwright, children's author and collector of folklore. He was one of the leading figures of the Irish Literary Revival.Contents1 Early life 2 Early poetry and plays 3 Later life and work 4 Selected works 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit]Padraic ColumColum was born Patrick Columb in a County Longford
County Longford
workhouse, where his father worked. He was the first of eight children born to Patrick and Susan Columb.[1] When the father lost his job in 1889, he moved to the United States to participate in the Colorado gold rush. Padraic and his mother and siblings remained in Ireland. When the father returned in 1892, the family moved to Glasthule, near Dublin, where his father was employed as Assistant Manager at Sandycove and Glasthule
Glasthule
railway station
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The King Of Ireland's Son
The King of Ireland's Son is a children's novel published in Ireland in 1916 written by Padraic Colum, and illustrated by Willy Pogany. It is the story of the eldest of the King of Ireland's sons, and his adventures winning and then finding Fedelma, the Enchanter's Daughter, who after being won is kidnapped from him by the King of the Land of Mist. It is solidly based in Irish folklore, itself being originally a folktale. This is one of the classics of Irish children's literature, its magical stories winding in and out of each other from the start, when the careless son goes out, His hound at his heel, His hawk on his wrist, A brave steed to carry him whither he list, The blue sky above him, The green grass below him and meets an eccentric old man full of harmlessness and duplicity who invites him to a game of chess for whatever stake the winner might like
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Henrietta Christian Wright
Henrietta Christian Wright (1854–1899) was an American children's author[1] who resided in East Brunswick Township, New Jersey.[2] She was born in 1854 in Old Bridge in Middlesex County, New Jersey and died there in 1899 of tuberculosis. See her tombstone here.Contents1 Publishing career 2 Selected works 3 References 4 External linksPublishing career[edit] She wrote children's books on literature, history and science
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Algernon Charles Swinburne
Algernon Charles Swinburne
Algernon Charles Swinburne
(5 April 1837 – 10 April 1909) was an English poet, playwright, novelist, and critic. He wrote several novels and collections of poetry such as Poems and Ballads, and contributed to the famous Eleventh Edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. Swinburne wrote about many taboo topics, such as lesbianism, cannibalism, sado-masochism, and anti-theism. His poems have many common motifs, such as the ocean, time, and death
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Balthus
Balthasar Klossowski de Rola (February 29, 1908 – February 18, 2001), known as Balthus, was a Polish-French modern artist. He is known for his erotically charged images of pubescent girls, but also for the refined, dreamlike quality of his imagery. Throughout his career, Balthus
Balthus
rejected the usual conventions of the art world. He insisted that his paintings should be seen and not read about, and he resisted any attempts made to build a biographical profile
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The Library Of America
The Library of America
Library of America
(LOA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. Founded in 1979 with seed money from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Ford Foundation, the LOA has published over 300 volumes by a wide range of authors from Mark Twain to Philip Roth, Nathaniel Hawthorne
Nathaniel Hawthorne
to Saul Bellow, including the selected writings of several U.S
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Peter Straub
Peter Francis Straub (born March 2, 1943) is an American novelist and poet. His horror fiction has received numerous literary honors such as the Bram Stoker Award, World Fantasy Award, and International Horror Guild Award.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Bibliography3.1 Novels 3.2 Short story collections 3.3 Novellas 3.4 Poems 3.5 Non-fiction 3.6 Anthologies (as editor) 3.7 Omnibus editions 3.8 Limited editions 3.9 Additional reading4 Adaptations 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Straub was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the son of Elvena (Nilsestuen) and Gordon Anthony Straub.[1][2] At the age of seven, Straub was struck by a car, sustaining serious injuries. He was hospitalized for several months, and temporarily used a wheelchair after being released until he had re-learned how to walk
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Shadowland (Straub Novel)
Shadowland is a novel by Peter Straub, first published in 1980 by Coward, McCann and Geohegen. It is a horror novel that has strong elements of fantasy. It was the first book Straub wrote following his highly successful Ghost Story. Plot summary[edit] The story concerns two young boys, Tom Flanagan and Del Nightingale, who spend a summer with Del's uncle Coleman Collins, who is one of the foremost magicians in the world. As time passes, however, Tom begins to suspect that what Collins is teaching is not a series of harmless tricks, but is in fact real sorcery. Setting[edit] Parts of the novel involves a thinly disguised version of Milwaukee Country Day School, which Straub attended.[1] References[edit]^ Bleiler, Richard
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Ciarán Of Saigir
Ciarán of Saigir
Ciarán of Saigir
(5th century – c. 530), also known as Ciarán mac Luaigne or Saint Kieran (Welsh: Cieran), was one of the Twelve Apostles of Ireland[2] and is considered the first saint to have been born in Ireland,[3] although the legend that he preceded Saint Patrick
Saint Patrick
is questionable. Ciarán was bishop of Saighir (Seir-Kieran) and remains the patron saint of its successor, the diocese of Ossory. He is identified with the Saint Piran
Saint Piran
who is venerated in Cornwall, Wales, and Brittany.[4][5][6] His feast day is celebrated on 5 March. He is sometimes called Saint Ciarán the Elder (Latin: Kyaranus or Ciaranus Maior) to distinguish him from the other 6th-century Irish Saint Ciarán, who was abbot of Clonmacnoise. He shares the feast date of 5 March with his mother, St
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John Crowley
John Crowley
John Crowley
/ˈkraʊli/ (born December 1, 1942) is an American author of fantasy, science fiction and mainstream fiction
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The Solitudes (novel)
The Solitudes (originally titled Ægypt contrary to Crowley's wishes[1]) is a 1987 modern fantasy novel by John Crowley. It is Crowley's fifth published novel and the first novel in the four-volume Ægypt series. The novel follows Pierce Moffett, a college history professor in his retreat from ordinary, academic life to pastoral life of Faraway Hills. While in the area, Pierce comes up with a plan to write a book about Hermeticism, in the process finding several parallels with his own project and that of the nearly-forgotten local novelist Fellowes Kraft. The novel takes place in two time periods and features three main protagonists; that of Pierce's in the late twentieth century, and that of John Dee, Edward Kelley
Edward Kelley
and Giordano Bruno
Giordano Bruno
as from the historical novels of Kraft in the Renaissance
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