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The King Must Die
The King Must Die
The King Must Die
is a 1958 bildungsroman and historical novel by Mary Renault that traces the early life and adventures of Theseus, a hero in Greek mythology. Naturally, it is set in Ancient Greece: Troizen, Corinth, Eleusis, Athens, Knossos
Knossos
in Crete, and Naxos. Rather than retelling the myth, Renault constructs an archaeologically and anthropologically plausible story that might have developed into the myth. She captures the essentials while removing the more fantastical elements, such as monsters and the appearances of gods
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Elton John
Sir
Sir
Elton Hercules John CBE (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947)[1][2][3] is an English singer, pianist, and composer. He has worked with lyricist Bernie Taupin
Bernie Taupin
as his songwriting partner since 1967; they have collaborated on more than 30 albums to date. In his five-decade career Elton John
Elton John
has sold more than 300 million records, making him one of the best-selling music artists in the world.[4][5] He has more than fifty Top 40 hits, including seven consecutive No. 1 US albums, 58 Billboard Top 40 singles, 27 Top 10, four No. 2 and nine No. 1. For 31 consecutive years (1970–2000) he had at least one song in the Billboard Hot 100
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Phaedra (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Phaedra /ˈfiːdrə, ˈfɛdrə/ (Ancient Greek: Φαίδρα, Phaidra) (or Fedra) is the daughter of Minos
Minos
and Pasiphaë, wife of Theseus, sister of Ariadne, and the mother of Demophon of Athens
Demophon of Athens
and Acamas. Phaedra's name derives from the Greek word φαιδρός (phaidros), which meant "bright".Phaedra (1880) by Alexandre CabanelThough married to Theseus, Phaedra fell in love with Hippolytus, Theseus's son by another woman (born to either Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons, or Antiope, her sister). But Hippolytus rejected her. In revenge, Phaedra wrote Theseus
Theseus
a letter that claimed Hippolytus had raped her
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Aigeus
In Greek mythology, Aegeus (Ancient Greek: Αἰγεύς, translit. Aigeús) or Aegeas (Αιγέας, translit. Aigéas), was an archaic figure in the founding myth of Athens. The "goat-man" who gave his name to the Aegean Sea was, next to Poseidon, the father of Theseus, the founder of Athenian institutions and one of the kings of Athens.Contents1 The Myth1.1 His reign 1.2 Conflict with Crete 1.3 Theseus and the Minotaur2 Legacy 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksThe Myth[edit]Themis and Aegeus. Attic red-figure kylix, 440–430 BCHis reign[edit] Upon the death of the king, Pandion II, Aegeus and his three brothers, Pallas, Nisos, and Lykos, took control of Athens from Metion, who had seized the throne from Pandion. They divided the government in four and Aegeus became king. Aegeus' first wife was Meta,[1] and his second wife was Chalciope. Still without a male heir, Aegeus asked the oracle at Delphi for advice
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Isthmus Of Corinth
The Isthmus
Isthmus
of Corinth
Corinth
is the narrow land bridge which connects the Peloponnese
Peloponnese
peninsula with the rest of the mainland of Greece, near the city of Corinth. The word "isthmus" comes from the Ancient Greek word for "neck" and refers to the narrowness of the land.[1] The Isthmus
Isthmus
was known in the ancient world as the landmark separating the Peloponnese
Peloponnese
from mainland Greece. In the first century AD the geographer Strabo[2] noted a stele on the Isthmus
Isthmus
of Corinth, which bore two inscriptions. One towards the East, i.e. towards Megara, reading: "Here is not Peloponnesus, but Ionia" (τάδ᾽ οὐχὶ Πελοπόννησος, ἀλλ᾽ Ἰωνία) and the one towards the West, i.e
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Medea
In Greek mythology, Medea
Medea
(/mɪˈdiːə/; Greek: Μήδεια, Mēdeia, Georgian: მედეა) was the daughter of King Aeëtes of Colchis,[1] niece of Circe, granddaughter of the sun god Helios. Medea
Medea
figures in the myth of
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Gymnastics
Gymnastics
Gymnastics
is a sport practiced by men and women that requires balance, strength, flexibility, agility, coordination, endurance and control. The movements involved in gymnastics contribute to the development of the arms, legs, shoulders, back, chest and abdominal muscle groups. Alertness, precision, daring, self-confidence and self-discipline are mental traits that can also be developed through gymnastics.[1] Gymnastics
Gymnastics
evolved from exercises used by the ancient Greeks that included skills for mounting and dismounting a horse, and from circus performance skills. Most forms of competitive gymnastics events are governed by the Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique
Fédération Internationale de Gymnastique
(FIG). Each country has its own national governing body (BIW) affiliated to FIG. Competitive artistic gymnastics is the best known of the gymnastic events
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Tsakonikos
The Tsakonikos or Tsakonikos horos (Greek: Τσακώνικος χορός "Tsakonian dance") is a dance performed in the Peloponnese in Greece. It comes from the region, chiefly in Arcadia, known as Tsakonia. It is danced in many towns villages there with little variation to the steps. In Ayios Andreas, it is performed as a mixed dance in an open circle, with the hands held up (αγκαζέ angaze, in Greek). The most popular songs for the tsakonikos are "Sou ipa mana kale mana" and "Kinisan ta tsamopoula".[1] The dance is performed to a 5 4 (3+2) rhythm in an open circle which slowly winds in upon itself, forming a snail-shaped design. This labyrinthine formation is, according to legend, linked to the Crane dance of Theseus
Theseus
in Greek mythology, who slew the Minotaur
Minotaur
in the Labyrinth
Labyrinth
of King Minos
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Daedalus
In Greek mythology, Daedalus
Daedalus
(/ˈdɛdələs ˈdiːdələs/; Ancient Greek: Δαίδαλος Daidalos "cunningly wrought", perhaps related to δαιδάλλω "to work artfully";[1] Latin: Daedalus; Etruscan: Taitale) was a skillful craftsman and artist.[2][3] He is the father of Icarus, the uncle of Perdix, and possibly also the father of Iapyx, although this is unclear.Contents1 Family 2 Daedalus' Statues 3 The Labyrinth 4 Daedalu
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Maenads
In Greek mythology, maenads (/ˈmiːnædz/; Ancient Greek: μαινάδες [maiˈnades]) were the female followers of Dionysus and the most significant members of the Thiasus, the god's retinue. Their name literally translates as "raving ones". Maenads were known as Bassarids, Bacchae /ˈbækiː/ or Bacchantes /ˈbækənts, bəˈkænts, -ˈkɑːnts/ in Roman mythology
Roman mythology
after the penchant of the equivalent Roman god, Bacchus, to wear a bassaris or fox-skin. Often the maenads were portrayed as inspired by Dionysus
Dionysus
into a state of ecstatic frenzy through a combination of dancing and intoxication.[1] During these rites, the maenads would dress in fawn skins and carry a thyrsus, a long stick wrapped in ivy or vine leaves and tipped with a pine cone
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Asterion
In Greek mythology, Asterion (/əˈstɪriən/; Greek: Ἀστερίων, gen.: Ἀστερίωνος, literally "starry") or Asterius (/əˈstɪriəs/; Ἀστέριος) may refer to the following figures:Asterion, one of the Potamoi.[1] Asterius, one of the Giants.[2] Asterion, an attendant of the starry-god Astraeus.[3] Asterion or Asterius, king of Crete.[4] Asterion or Asterius, name of the Minotaur.[5] Asterius, a son of Minos
Minos
and Androgenia, a girl from the Cretan city of Phaestus. He was the commander of Cretans who joined the god Dionysus in his Indian War
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Aethra (Greek Mythology)
Aethra or AETHRA may refer to: Aethra (Greek mythology), a number of different characters in Greek mythology Aethra (genus), a genus of crab in the family Aethridae AETHRA Componentes Automotivos, a Brazilian auto testing company Aethra, a fictional moon in the Colony Wars franchise 132 Aethra, an M-type main-belt asteroid The Aethra
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Poseidon
Poseidon
Poseidon
(/pəˈsaɪdən, pɒ-, poʊ-/;[1] Greek: Ποσειδῶν, pronounced [pose͜edɔ́͜ɔn]) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth. He was god of the Sea and other waters; of earthquakes; and of horses.[2] In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos
Pylos
and Thebes.[2] Poseidon
Poseidon
was protector of seafarers, and of many Hellenic cities and colonies. In Homer's Iliad, Poseidon
Poseidon
supports the Greeks against the Trojans during the Trojan War
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Bull-leaping
Bull-leaping
Bull-leaping
(also taurokathapsia, from Greek ταυροκαθάψια[1]) is a motif of Middle Bronze Age figurative art, notably of Minoan Crete, but also found in Hittite Anatolia, the Levant, Bactria and the Indus Valley.[2] It is often interpreted as a depiction of a ritual performed in connection with bull worship
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Apollo
Apollo
Apollo
(Attic, Ionic, and Homeric
Homeric
Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo
Apollo
has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo
Apollo
is the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis
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Gaia (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Gaia
Gaia
(/ˈɡeɪ.ə/ or /ˈɡaɪ.ə/ from Ancient Greek Γαῖα, a poetical form of Γῆ Gē, "land" or "earth"[1]), also spelled Gaea, is the personification of the Earth[2] and one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia
Gaia
is the ancestral mother of all life: the primal Mother Earth
Earth
goddess. She is the immediate parent of Uranus (the sky), from whose sexual union she bore the Titans (themselves parents of many of the Olympian gods) and the Giants, and of Pontus (the sea), from whose union she bore the primordial sea gods
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