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The Golden Cangue
The Golden Cangue (金鎖記) is a 1943 Chinese novella by Eileen Chang. The author's own English translation appeared in the anthology Modern Chinese Stories and Novellas: 1919–1949 (1981) published by Columbia University Press. Fu Lei
Fu Lei
was an enthusiastic fan of the story,[1] while C. T. Hsia considered it "the greatest novelette in the history of Chinese literature".[2] The Golden Cangue was adapted into a 2004 Chinese TV series directed by Mu Deyuan (穆德远)
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Hu Lancheng
Hu Lancheng (simplified Chinese: 胡兰成; traditional Chinese: 胡蘭成; pinyin: Hú Lánchéng) (Feb 28, 1906 – July 25, 1981) was a Chinese writer and editor. Hu's first wife was Eileen Chang, a novelist.Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Works 4 See also 5 ReferencesCareer[edit] During the Second Sino-Japanese War, Hu collaborated with the Japanese, serving briefly in the Propaganda Ministry of the puppet government in China
China
headed by Wang Jingwei
Wang Jingwei
in the early 1940s and publishing a literary journal, Bitter Bamboo in which Chang published some of her work. Disagreements with colleagues in Nanjing led to his departure for Wuhan, where he continued supporting the regime as the editor of Dachubao until 1945
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Clifton Ko
Clifton Ko (Chinese: 高志森; pinyin: Gāo Zhìsēn; born 1958) is a Hong Kong
Hong Kong
film director, actor, producer and scriptwriter. He graduated from Kwun Tong Maryknoll College, and entered TV and film industry in late 1970s, firstly worked with director Clifford Choi. In this period he wrote Choi's No U-Turn (1981) and Teenage Dreamers (Chinese: 檸檬可樂; pinyin: Ningmeng Kele; Jyutping: Ling mung hoh lok; literally: "Lemon Cola"), and John Woo's comedy Once a Thief. In 1982 Ko entered Raymond Wong's the newly founded Cinema City & Films Co., and directed his first film The Happy Ghost
Happy Ghost
in 1984. The film series, like all his major works, is a slapstick comedy with moral teaching, family value, and optimism. Ko, together the company, is prolific in making "Chinese New Year movies"
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Columbia University Press
Columbia University
Columbia University
Press is a university press based in New York City, and affiliated with Columbia University
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Brill Publishers
Brill (Euronext: BRILL) (known as E. J. Brill, Koninklijke Brill, Brill Academic Publishers) is a Dutch international academic publisher founded in 1683 in Leiden, Netherlands. With offices in Leiden, Boston, Paderborn
Paderborn
and Singapore, Brill today publishes 275 journals and around 1200 new books and reference works each year. In addition, Brill is a provider of primary source materials online and on microform for researchers in the humanities and social sciences.Contents1 Areas of publication 2 History2.1 Luchtmans, 1683–1848 2.2 E. J
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Indiana University Press
Indiana University
Indiana University
Press, also known as IU Press, is an academic publisher founded in 1950 at Indiana University
Indiana University
that specializes in the humanities and social sciences. Its headquarters are located in Bloomington, Indiana. IU Press publishes 140 new books annually, in addition to 29 academic journals, and maintains a current catalog comprising some 2,000 titles.[2] Indiana University
Indiana University
Press primarily publishes in the following areas: African, African American, Asian, cultural, Jewish, Holocaust, Middle Eastern studies, Russian and Eastern European, and women's and gender studies; anthropology, film studies, folklore, history, bioethics, music, paleontology, philanthropy, philosophy, and religion
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Ann Hui
Ann Hui
Ann Hui
On-wah, MBE (traditional Chinese: 許鞍華; simplified Chinese: 许鞍华; pinyin: Xǔ Ānhuá; Hepburn: Kyo Anka; born 23 May 1947)[1][2] is a Hong Kong
Hong Kong
film director, producer, screenwriter and actress. She is one of the most critically acclaimed Hong Kong
Hong Kong
New Wave filmmakers. She is known for her films about social issues in Hong Kong. Hui has won numerous awards for her films, including, Best Director and Best Picture at the Hong Kong
Hong Kong
Film Awards, and Best Film at the Asia Pacific Film Festival
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Huang Shuqin
Huang Shuqin (born 9 September 1939) is a Chinese film director best known for her film Woman, Demon, Human, which Dai Jinhua called "the only film in China that is made from a woman's perspective".[1] The film is also considered the first feminist Chinese film.[2] Born and raised in Shanghai, Huang is the daughter of Huang Zuolin, a well-known film and stage director. Although her film career didn't take off until she was well into her forties, she is regarded as one of China's most talented female directors
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Wang Anyi
Wang Anyi (born 6 March 1954) is a Chinese writer. The daughter of renowned writer Ru Zhijuan, Wang is considered a leading figure in contemporary Chinese literature. She has been vice-chair of China Writers Association since 2006, and professor in Chinese Literature at Fudan University
Fudan University
since 2004. Wang's stories are frequently set in her hometown Shanghai, and David Der-wei Wang has called her the "new successor to the Shanghai School". Wang also regularly writes about the countryside in Anhui, where she was "sent down" during the Cultural Revolution.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Works translated to English 5 Major awards 6 ReferencesEarly life[edit] The second of three children of writers Wang Xiaoping (王啸平) and Ru Zhijuan, Wang Anyi was born in Nanjing
Nanjing
in 1954, but moved to Shanghai
Shanghai
at age 1 with her parents
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C. T. Hsia
Hsia Chih-tsing or C. T. Hsia (February 18, 1921 – December 29, 2013) was a Chinese literary critic and scholar. He was born in Pudong, Shanghai. Hsia graduated from the now-defunct University of Shanghai. In September 1946, he followed his older brother, T. A. Hsia zh:夏濟安 (1916-1965) to Peking University
Peking University
to accept the position of teaching assistant and continued to study Western literature. His thesis on William Blake
William Blake
won him a scholarship to Yale University. He moved to the United States in 1947, and was awarded a Ph.D. from Yale University in 1951. Hsia then went on to teach at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1955-56, the Huston-Tillotson College, Austin, Texas, 1956–57, the State University of New York, Potsdam, New York 1957-61, and the University of Pittsburgh
University of Pittsburgh
1961-62
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Fu Lei
Fu Lei
Fu Lei
(Fou Lei; Chinese: 傅雷; courtesy name Nu'an 怒安, pseudonym Nu'an 怒庵; 1908–1966), with his renowned rendition of Balzac
Balzac
and Romain Rolland, was one of China's most respected translators of French literature. Born in Nanhui, today a district of Shanghai, Fu Lei
Fu Lei
was raised by his mother. Between 1928 and 1931 he read literature and art history in Paris, befriending, amongst others, Jacques Maritain
Jacques Maritain
and Jean Daniélou.[1] Between 1932 and 1934 he taught art history at Shanghai Art Academy. An occasional critic and curator, for the most part of his working life, Fu Lei
Fu Lei
translated full-time.[2] In 1958 Fu Lei
Fu Lei
was labelled a rightist in the Anti-Rightist Movement. In 1966, at the beginning of the Cultural Revolution, he and his wife Zhu Meifu committed suicide
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Shanghai Dramatic Arts Centre
Shanghai
Shanghai
Dramatic Arts Centre (上海话剧艺术中心) is a professional theatrical company based in Shanghai, China, founded on January 23, 1995 after the merger of Shanghai's two largest theatres, the Shanghai
Shanghai
People's Art Theatre (上海人民艺术剧院) and the Shanghai
Shanghai
Youth Drama Troupe (上海青年话剧团).[1] Its founders are Xia Yan, Huang Zuolin and Xiong Foxi.[2] Currently, its contracted actors include Michael Chen, Ryan Cheng, Xu Zheng and Ma Yili. References[edit]^ Adam, Frank (January 1996). "The Double Life of Shanghai
Shanghai
Theatre". American Theatre. Retrieved 2015-04-23.  ^ " Shanghai
Shanghai
Dramatic Arts Center". chinaculture.org
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Love In A Fallen City (TV Series)
Love in a Fallen City is a 2009 Chinese television series based on Eileen Chang's 1943 novella of the same name
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Lust, Caution
Lust, Caution
Lust, Caution
(Chinese: 色,戒; pinyin: Sè, Jiè; Jyutping: Sik1Gaai3) is a 2007 erotic espionage thriller film directed by Ang Lee, based on the novella of the same name published in 1979 by Chinese author Eileen Chang. The story is mostly set in Hong Kong in 1938 and in Shanghai in 1942, when it was occupied by the Imperial Japanese Army and ruled by the puppet government led by Wang Jingwei. It depicts a group of Chinese university students from the Lingnan University who plot to assassinate a high-ranking special agent and recruiter working for the puppet government, by using one of their group, an attractive young woman, to lure him into a honey trap. With this film, Lee won the Golden Lion
Golden Lion
Award at the Venice Film Festival for the second time, the first being with Brokeback Mountain.[4] The film adaptation and the story are loosely based on events that took place during the Japanese occupation of Shanghai
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