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The Girl With All The Gifts
The Girl with All the Gifts
The Girl with All the Gifts
is a science-fiction novel by M.R. Carey, published in June 2014 by Orbit Books, based on his 2013 Edgar Award nominated short story Iphigenia In Aulis and written concurrently with the screenplay for the 2016 film. It deals with a dystopian future in which most of humanity is wiped out by a fungal infection.[1]Contents1 Characters 2 Plot 3 Reception 4 Film adaptation 5 Prequel Novel 6 ReferencesCharacters[edit] Melanie – test subject number one, a host of the Ophiocordyceps unilateralis fungal infection. She has a brilliant intellect. Very fair skin, long hair, about ten years old. Miss Helen Justineau – a compassionate teacher with a psychology background, who has become attached to the child subjects of the military-run experiment at Hotel Echo. She always wears one item of red in her clothing or accessories
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Muzzle (device)
A muzzle is a device that is placed over the snout of an animal to keep it from biting or otherwise opening its mouth. Muzzles can be primarily solid, with air holes to allow the animal to breathe, or formed from a set of straps that provides better air circulation and allow the animal to drink, and in some cases, eat. Leather, wire, plastic, and nylon are common materials for muzzles. The shape and construction of the muzzle might differ depending on whether the intent is to prevent an animal from biting or from eating, for example.Contents1 Dog
Dog
muzzles 2 Equine muzzles 3 See also 4 External links Dog
Dog
muzzles[edit] Muzzles are sometimes used on untrained dogs, large or small, to prevent unwanted biting or scavenging. They can also be used on dogs who display aggression, whether motivated by excitement, fear or prey drive
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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NPR
National Public Radio
Radio
(usually shortened to NPR, stylized as npr) is an American privately and publicly funded non-profit membership media organization based in Washington DC. It serves as a national syndicator to a network of over 1,000 public radio stations in the United States.[2] NPR
NPR
produces and distributes news and cultural programming. Individual public radio stations are not required to broadcast all NPR
NPR
programs; most broadcast a mix of NPR
NPR
programs, content from rival providers American Public Media, Public Radio
Radio
International, Public Radio Exchange and WNYC
WNYC
Studios, and locally produced programs
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Entertainment Weekly
Entertainment
Entertainment
Weekly (sometimes abbreviated as EW) is an American magazine, published by Meredith Corporation, that covers film, television, music, Broadway theatre, books and popular culture. Different from celebrity-focused publications like Us Weekly, People (a sister magazine to EW), and In Touch Weekly, EW primarily concentrates on entertainment media news and critical reviews. However, unlike Variety and The Hollywood Reporter, which are aimed at industry insiders, EW targets a more general audience.Contents1 History 2 Typical content and frequency2.1 Layout2.1.1 News and notes 2.1.2 Feature articles 2.1.3 Reviews 2.1.4 The Bullseye2.2 Specialty issues3 Thousandth issue and redesign 4 Website 5 Poppy Awards 6 Notable former contributors 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The first issue was published on February 16, 1990,[3][4] and featured singer k.d. lang on its cover
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The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
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Slate (magazine)
Optional for Slate Plus and commenting only (US readers) Metered paywall (non-US readers)Launched 1996; 22 years ago (1996)Current status ActiveSlate is an online magazine that covers current affairs, politics, and culture in the United States from a liberal perspective.[2][3] It was created in 1996 by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley, initially under the ownership of Microsoft
Microsoft
as part of MSN. On December 21, 2004, it was purchased by The Washington Post
The Washington Post
Company, later renamed the Graham Holdings Company. Since June 4, 2008, Slate has been managed by The Slate Group, an online publishing entity created by the Graham Holdings Company
Graham Holdings Company
to develop and manage web-only magazines
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Environmental Trigger
Environmental factor
Environmental factor
or ecological factor or eco factor is any factor, abiotic or biotic, that influences living organisms.[1] Abiotic factors include ambient temperature, amount of sunlight, and pH of the water soil in which an organism lives. Biotic factors would include the availability of food organisms and the presence of conspecifics, competitors, predators, and parasites.Contents1 Overview 2 Other 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOverview[edit] Cancer
Cancer
mainly the result of environmental factors.[2]An organism's genotype (e.g., in the zygote) translated into the adult phenotype through development during an organism's ontogeny, and subject to influences by many environmental effects
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Sporangium
A sporangium (pl., sporangia[1]) (modern Latin, from Greek σπόρος (sporos) ‘spore’ + αγγείον (angeion) ‘vessel’) is an enclosure in which spores are formed.[2] It can be composed of a single cell or can be multicellular. All plants, fungi, and many other lineages form sporangia at some point in their life cycle. Sporangia can produce spores by mitosis, but in nearly all land plants and many fungi, sporangia are the site of meiosis and produce genetically distinct haploid spores.Contents1 Fungi 2 Land plants2.1 Eusporangia and leptosporangia 2.2 Synangium3 Internal structures 4 See also 5 ReferencesFungi[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (August 2016)The structure that contains the spores in fungal species. Land plants[edit] In mosses, liverworts and hornworts, an unbranched sporophyte produces a single sporangium, which may be quite complex morphologically
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Sepsis
Sepsis
Sepsis
is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to infection causes injury to its own tissues and organs.[8] Common signs and symptoms include fever, increased heart rate, increased breathing rate, and confusion.[1] There also may be symptoms related to a specific infection, such as a cough with pneumonia, or painful urination with a kidney infection.[2] In the very young, old, and people with a weakened immune system, there may be no symptoms of a specific infection and the body temperature may be low or normal, rather than high.[2] Severe sepsis is sepsis causing poor orga
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Rosalind Franklin
Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 – 16 April 1958)[1] was an English chemist and X-ray crystallographer
X-ray crystallographer
who made contributions to the understanding of the molecular structures of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), RNA
RNA
(ribonucleic acid), viruses, coal, and graphite.[2] Although her works on coal and viruses were appreciated in her lifetime, her contributions to the discovery of the structure of DNA
DNA
were largely recognised posthumously. Born to a prominent British Jewish family, Franklin was educated at a private day school at Norland Place in West London, Lindores School for Young Ladies in Sussex, and St Paul's Girls' School, London. Then she studied the Natural Sciences Tripos at Newnham College, Cambridge, from which she graduated in 1941
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Intelligence Quotient
An intelligence quotient (IQ) is a total score derived from several standardized tests designed to assess human intelligence. The abbreviation "IQ" was coined by the psychologist William Stern for the German term Intelligenzquotient, his term for a scoring method for intelligence tests at University of Breslau
University of Breslau
he advocated in a 1912 book.[1] Historically, IQ is a score obtained by dividing a person's mental age score, obtained by administering an intelligence test, by the person's chronological age, both expressed in terms of years and months. The resulting fraction is multiplied by 100 to obtain the IQ score.[2] When current IQ tests
IQ tests
were developed, the median raw score of the norming sample is defined as IQ 100 and scores each standard deviation (SD) up or down are defined as 15 IQ points greater or less,[3] although this was not always so historically
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Zombie
OverviewZombie Zombie
Zombie
walkZombies in mediaFilms Short films and nominal zombie films Series Video games Novelsv t eA zombie (Haitian French: zombi, Haitian Creole: zonbi) is a fictional undead being created through the reanimation of a human corpse. Zombies are most commonly found in horror and fantasy genre works. The term comes from Haitian folklore, where a zombie is a dead body reanimated through various methods, most commonly magic
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Non-commissioned Officer
A non-commissioned officer or noncommissioned officer (NCO, colloquially non-com or noncom) is a military officer who has not earned a commission.[1][2][3] Such is also called sub-officer in some countries. Non-commissioned officers, in the English-speaking world, usually obtain their position of authority by promotion through the enlisted ranks.[4] In contrast, commissioned officers hold higher ranks than NCOs, have more legal responsibilities, are paid more, and often have more non-military training such as a university diploma. Commissioned officers
Commissioned officers
usually earn their commissions without having risen through the enlisted ranks
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Ophiocordyceps Unilateralis
Torrubia unilateralis Tul. (1865) Cordyceps unilateralis (Tul.) Sacc. (1883) Ophiocordyceps
Ophiocordyceps
unilateralis is an entomopathogen, or insect-pathogenising fungus, discovered by the British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace
Alfred Russel Wallace
in 1859, and currently found predominantly in tropical forest ecosystems. O. unilateralis infects ants of the Camponotini
Camponotini
tribe, with the full pathogenesis being characterized by alteration of the behavioral patterns of the infected ant
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Dystopia
A dystopia (from the Greek δυσ- "bad" and τόπος "place"; alternatively, cacotopia,[1] kakotopia, or simply anti-utopia) is a community or society that is undesirable or frightening.[2][3] It is translated as "not-good place" and is an antonym of utopia, a term that was coined by Sir Thomas More
Thomas More
and figures as the title of his best known work, Utopia, published 1516, a blueprint for an ideal society with minimal crime, violence and poverty. Dystopian societies appear in many artistic works, particularly in stories set in the future. Some of the most famous examples are George Orwell's 1984 and Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. Dystopias are often characterized by dehumanization,[2] totalitarian governments, environmental disaster,[3] or other characteristics associated with a cataclysmic decline in society
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