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The Garden Murder Case
The Garden Murder Case
The Garden Murder Case
(first published in 1935) is the ninth in a series of mystery novels by S. S. Van Dine about fictional detective Philo Vance.Contents1 Plot outline 2 Literary significance and criticism 3 Film adaptation 4 References 5 External linksPlot outline[edit] Floyd, the son of Professor Garden, invites his socialite friends to the rooftop garden of his father’s New York penthouse to listen to the outcome of horse races. Detective Philo Vance receives an anonymous telephone message inviting him to one of Floyd’s gatherings. On that particular night, Floyd’s best friend has placed an enormous bet on a horse named Equanimity. Once it is announced that Equanimity has lost the race, a gunshot is heard and Floyd’s friend is found dead of a gunshot wound. Though initially thought to be a suicide, Detective Vance deems the death a murder
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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Studios Inc. (abbreviated as MGM or M-G-M, also known as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Pictures, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
or simply Metro, and for a former interval known as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/United Artists, or MGM/UA) is an American media company, involved primarily in the production and distribution of feature films and television programs. One of the world's oldest film studios, MGM's headquarters are located at 245 North Beverly Drive in Beverly Hills, California.[3] Once the largest, most glamorous, and most revered film studio in Hollywood, MGM was founded in 1924 when the entertainment entrepreneur Marcus Loew
Marcus Loew
gained control of Metro Pictures, Goldwyn Pictures, and Louis B. Mayer
Louis B

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Hardcover
A hardcover or hardback (also known as hardbound, and sometimes as case-bound) book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with buckram or other cloth, heavy paper, or occasionally leather). It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN
ISBN
sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation Hbk.Detail of "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea", first English edition (1873), showing cloth pattern on cover Hardcover
Hardcover
books are often printed on acid-free paper, and they are much more durable than paperbacks, which have flexible, easily damaged paper covers. Hardcover
Hardcover
books are marginally more costly to manufacture
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Paperback
A paperback is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples. In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets, yellowbacks, dime novels, and airport novels.[1] Modern paperbacks can be differentiated by size. In the U.S., there are "mass-market paperbacks" and larger, more durable "trade paperbacks." In the U.K., there are A-format, B-format, and the largest C-format sizes.[2] Paperback
Paperback
editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheaper, lower quality paper; glued (rather than stapled or sewn) bindings; and the lack of a hard cover may contribute to the lower cost of paperbacks
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Orion Publishing Group
Orion Publishing Group
Orion Publishing Group
Ltd. is a UK-based book publisher. It is owned by Hachette Livre. In 1998 Orion bought Cassell.[1]Contents1 Imprints 2 Distribution 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksImprints[edit] The group's imprints include:[2]Allen & Unwin Cassell Military Paperbacks Cassell's National Library J. M. Dent (Everyman Classics) Indigo (YA imprint) Millennium Orion Audiobooks Orion Books Orion Children's Books Orion Paperbacks Phoenix Books Trapeze Victor Gollancz Ltd Weidenfeld & NicolsonThe group also distributes books for the independent Halban Publishers. Distribution[edit] Books distributed through Littlehampton book services.[3] See also[edit]List of largest UK book publishers UK children's book publishersReferences[edit]^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-09-30. Retrieved 2008-09-08.  ^ "Imprints"
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Scribner's
Charles Scribner's Sons, or simply Scribner's or Scribner, is an American publisher based in New York City, known for publishing American authors including Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Kurt Vonnegut, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Stephen King, Robert A. Heinlein, Thomas Wolfe, George Santayana, John Clellon Holmes, Don DeLillo, and Edith Wharton. The firm published Scribner's Magazine
Scribner's Magazine
for many years. More recently, several Scribner titles and authors have garnered Pulitzer Prizes, National Book Awards and other merits. In 1978 the company merged with Atheneum and became The Scribner Book Companies. In turn it merged into Macmillan in 1984.[1] Simon & Schuster bought Macmillan in 1994.[2] By this point only the trade book and reference book operations still bore the original family name
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Mystery Fiction
Mystery fiction
Mystery fiction
is a genre of fiction usually involving a mysterious death or a crime to be solved. In a closed circle of suspects, each suspect must have a credible motive and a reasonable opportunity for committing the crime. The central character must be a detective who eventually solves the mystery by logical deduction from facts fairly presented to the reader.[1] Sometimes mystery books are nonfictional. "Mystery fiction" can be detective stories in which the emphasis is on the puzzle or suspense element and its logical solution such as a whodunit. Mystery fiction
Mystery fiction
can be contrasted with hardboiled detective stories, which focus on action and gritty realism. Mystery fiction
Mystery fiction
may involve a supernatural mystery where the solution does not have to be logical, and even no crime involved
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Mystery Novel
Mystery fiction
Mystery fiction
is a genre of fiction usually involving a mysterious death or a crime to be solved. In a closed circle of suspects, each suspect must have a credible motive and a reasonable opportunity for committing the crime. The central character must be a detective who eventually solves the mystery by logical deduction from facts fairly presented to the reader.[1] Sometimes mystery books are nonfictional. "Mystery fiction" can be detective stories in which the emphasis is on the puzzle or suspense element and its logical solution such as a whodunit. Mystery fiction
Mystery fiction
can be contrasted with hardboiled detective stories, which focus on action and gritty realism. Mystery fiction
Mystery fiction
may involve a supernatural mystery where the solution does not have to be logical, and even no crime involved
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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The Winter Murder Case
The Winter Murder Case
The Winter Murder Case
(1939) is a Philo Vance novella that S. S. Van Dine intended to expand into his twelfth full-length book, a project cut short by his death. The Winter Murder Case
The Winter Murder Case
seems especially similar to the B mystery movies of the 1930s, a cross between Van Dine's usual style and the film style. It was intended as a vehicle for Sonja Henie. Van Dine's last two books were intended as Hollywood
Hollywood
scenarios. Both are shorter than Van Dine's typical novels. Literary significance and criticism[edit] "The decline in the last six Vance books is so steep that the critic who called the ninth of them one more stitch in his literary shroud was not overstating the case." wrote Julian Symons in Bloody Murder.[1] "This is [Van Dine's] last work, left in an only semi-expanded outline form at the time of his death
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The Greene Murder Case
The Greene Murder Case is a 1928 mystery novel by S. S. Van Dine. It focuses on the murders, one by one, of members of the wealthy and contentious Greene family. This is the third in the series of Philo Vance whodunits, and the first of the Vance books not inspired by a real-life crime.Contents1 Plot synopsis 2 Literary significance and criticism 3 Film adaptations 4 Footnotes 5 References 6 External linksPlot synopsis[edit] Philo Vance takes a hand when, one evening, a daughter of the Greene family is shot to death and another one is wounded. The family comprises two sons and three daughters (the youngest, Ada, is adopted) under the rule of their mother, a bedridden invalid who spends her days feeling sorry for herself and cursing her ungrateful children. The family is required to live in the Greene mansion under the terms of their father's will
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The Gracie Allen Murder Case
The Gracie Allen
Gracie Allen
Murder Case (1938) (also published as The Scent of Murder) is the eleventh of twelve detective novels by S. S. Van Dine featuring his famous fictional detective of the 1920s and 1930s, Philo Vance. It also features the zany half of the Burns and Allen
Burns and Allen
comedy team. It is in some ways a roman à clef, including not just Burns and Allen but also such characters as Gracie's mother and brother. (George Burns, after all, has described the couple's act as, "All I had to do was ask, 'Gracie, how's your brother?' and she talked for 38 years.") That gave the book an unusual feel, as did the comic tone of much of Gracie's dialogue
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