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The Easter Bunny
The Easter
Easter
Bunny (also called the Easter
Easter
Rabbit
Rabbit
or Easter
Easter
Hare) is a folkloric figure and symbol of Easter, depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter
Easter
eggs. Originating among German Lutherans, the " Easter
Easter
Hare" originally played the role of a judge, evaluating whether children were good or disobedient in behavior at the start of the season of Eastertide.[1] The Easter
Easter
Bunny is sometimes depicted with clothes. In legend, the creature carries colored eggs in his basket, candy, and sometimes also toys to the homes of children, and as such shows similarities to Santa Claus
Santa Claus
or the Christkind, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holidays
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Legendary Creature
A legendary, mythical, or mythological creature, traditionally called a fabulous beast or fabulous creature, is a fictitious, imaginary and often supernatural animal, often a hybrid, sometimes part human, whose existence has not or cannot be proved and that is described in folklore or fiction but also in historical accounts before history became a science. In the classical era, monstrous creatures such as the Cyclops
Cyclops
and the Minotaur
Minotaur
appear in heroic tales for the protagonist to destroy
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Pennsylvania Dutch
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Dutch (Pennsilfaanisch Deitsch,  listen (help·info)) are a cultural group formed by early German-speaking immigrants to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and their descendants. The word "Dutch" does not refer to the Dutch people
Dutch people
or Dutch language, but to the German settlers, known as Deutsch (in standard German) and Deitsch (in the principal dialect they spoke, Palatine German). Most emigrated to the Americas from Germany
Germany
or Switzerland
Switzerland
in the 17th and 18th century. Over time, the various dialects spoken by these immigrants fused into a unique dialect of German known as Pennsylvania German or Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
"Dutch"
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Lagomorpha
Leporidae Ochotonidae Prolagidae
Prolagidae
†Range of Lagomorpha Fossil
Fossil
occurrences of leporids and ochotonids and global environmental change (climate change, C3/C4 plants distribution).[2]The lagomorphs are the members of the taxonomic order Lagomorpha, of which there are two living families: the Leporidae
Leporidae
(hares and rabbits) and the Ochotonidae
Ochotonidae
(pikas). The name of the order is derived from the Ancient Greek lagos (λαγώς, "hare") +morphē (μορφή, "form"). There are about eighty-seven species of lagomorph, including about twenty-nine species of pika, twenty-eight species of rabbit and cottontail, and thirty species of hare.[3] Lagomorphs share a common ancestor with rodents, together forming the clade Glires
Glires
(Latin: “dormice”)
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Folklore
Folklore
Folklore
is the expressive body of culture shared by a particular group of people; it encompasses the traditions common to that culture, subculture or group. These include oral traditions such as tales, proverbs and jokes. They include material culture, ranging from traditional building styles to handmade toys common to the group. Folklore
Folklore
also includes customary lore, the forms and rituals of celebrations such as Christmas
Christmas
and weddings, folk dances and initiation rites. Each one of these, either singly or in combination, is considered a folklore artifact. Just as essential as the form, folklore also encompasses the transmission of these artifacts from one region to another or from one generation to the next
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Egg Decorating
Egg
Egg
decorating is the art or craft of decorating eggs. It is quite a popular art/craft form because of the attractive, smooth, oval shape of the egg. Any bird egg can be facilitated in this process, but most often the larger and stronger the eggshell is, the more favoured it will be by decorators. Varieties[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Goose, duck and hens' eggs are usually "blown" – a hole is made in each end and the contents are blown out. The egg is then either carved, dyed, painted, appliqued or otherwise decorated (using a number of different techniques)
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Lent
Lent
Lent
(Latin: Quadragesima: Fortieth) is a solemn religious observance in the Christian liturgical calendar that begins on Ash Wednesday
Ash Wednesday
and ends approximately six weeks later, before Easter
Easter
Sunday
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Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It or
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Fasting
Fasting
Fasting
is the willing abstinence or reduction from some or all food, drink, or both, for a period of time. An absolute fast or dry fasting is normally defined as abstinence from all food and liquid for a defined period, usually 24 hours, or a number of days. Water fasting allows the drinking of water, but nothing else, although black coffee and tea may be consumed. Other fasts may be partially restrictive, limiting only particular foods or substances, or be intermittent. In a physiological context, fasting may refer to the metabolic status of a person who has not eaten overnight, or to the metabolic state achieved after complete digestion and absorption of a meal. Several metabolic adjustments occur during fasting. Some diagnostic tests are used to determine a fasting state
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Eastern Orthodox Church
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe,
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Christ
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Ukrainians
Ukrainians
Ukrainians
(Ukrainian: українці, ukrayintsi, [ukrɑˈjinʲtsʲi]) are an East Slavic ethnic group native to Ukraine, which is by total population the sixth-largest nation in Europe.[49] The Constitution of Ukraine
Ukraine
applies the term 'Ukrainians' to all its citizens. Also among historical names of the people of Ukraine, Rusyns
Rusyns
(Ruthenians), Cossacks, etc. can be found. According to most dictionary definitions, a descriptive name for the "inhabitants of Ukraine" is Ukrainian or Ukrainian people.[50] Rusyns are another related group found in western Ukraine, which are frequently referred to as being an ethnic subgroup of Ukrainians
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Pysanka
A pysanka (Ukrainian: писанка, plural: pysanky) is a Ukrainian Easter
Easter
egg, decorated with traditional Ukrainian folk designs using a wax-resist method. The word pysanka comes from the verb pysaty, "to write" or "to inscribe", as the designs are not painted on, but written (inscribed) with beeswax. Many other eastern European ethnic groups decorate eggs using wax resist for Easter
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Hare
See textHares and jackrabbits are leporids belonging to the genus Lepus. Hares are classified into the same family as rabbits. They are similar in size and form to rabbits and eat the same diet. They are generally herbivorous and long-eared, they are fast runners, and they typically live solitarily or in pairs. Hare
Hare
species are native to Africa, Eurasia, North America, and the Japanese archipelago. Five leporid species with "hare" in their common names are not considered true hares: the hispid hare (Caprolagus hispidus), and four species known as red rock hares (comprising Pronolagus). Meanwhile, jackrabbits are hares rather than rabbits. A hare less than one year old is called a leveret
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Vernal Equinox
The March equinox[1][2] or Northward equinox[3][4] is the equinox on the Earth
Earth
when the subsolar point appears to leave the southern hemisphere and cross the celestial equator, heading northward as seen from Earth. In the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
the March equinox
March equinox
is known as the vernal equinox, and in the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
as the autumnal equinox.[2][1][5] On the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
the Northward equinox can occur as early as 19 March or as late as 21 March. For a common year the computed time slippage is about 5 hours 49 minutes later than the previous year, and for a leap year about 18 hours 11 minutes earlier than the previous year
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Bonnet (headgear)
A bonnet is any of a wide variety of headgear for both sexes—more often female—from the Middle Ages to the present. It is impossible to generalize as to the styles for which the word has been used any more than for the hat and cap, but there is for both sexes a tendency to use the word for styles in soft material and lacking a brim. Yet the term has also been used, for example, for steel helmets. This was from Scotland
Scotland
(in 1505), where the term has long been especially popular.[1] Bonnet derives from the same word in French, where it originally indicated a type of material. In the 21st century, only a few kinds of headgear are still called bonnets, most commonly those worn by babies and Scottish soldiers
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